Antarctic Beech picnic area

Border Ranges National Park

Affected by closures, check current alerts 

Overview

At Antarctic Beech picnic area in World Heritage-listed Border Ranges National Park, near Murwillumbah, enjoy a picnic, walking and birdwatching in a rainforest setting.

Type
Picnic areas
Accessibility
Medium
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
Opening times

Antarctic Beech picnic area is always open, but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

What to
bring
Clothes for all weather conditions, drinking water, sunscreen
Please note
  • This park is in a remote location. Please be well-prepared and tell a family member or friend about your travel plans.
  • Consider having reasonably full fuel tanks before arriving, as there are no service stations near the park. The closest fuel is at Kyogle, Nimbin or Mount Burrell.
  • There is limited mobile reception in this park

Picnic amongst the dark green canopies and gnarled trunks of ancient Antarctic beech trees at Antarctic Beech picnic area in Border Ranges National Park.

This is a great place to stop and rest if you’re camping, bushwalking or car touring, as there are picnic tables as well as wood barbecues and toilets. Or, just sit down with a thermos and enjoy a cuppa. Here, you can relax, recharge, and enjoy expansive views north across the Lost World wilderness area to the Queensland border and Lamington National Park and beyond.

Be sure to bring your binoculars and camera if you enjoy birdwatching, wildlife-spotting and photography. Pademelons and bandicoots graze around the picnic area in the early mornings and evenings, and interesting native birdlife you may see include lyrebirds, sooty owls, fruit doves, noisy pitas, green catbirds, honeyeaters and olive whistlers. Dingoes can also sometimes be seen and heard, most often in the early morning.

During springtime, beech orchids bloom high on the trunks and branches of the trees, while in summer the Illawarra flame tree can be spotted glowing red amongst the dark green canopy.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Map


Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/picnic-areas/antarctic-beech-picnic-area/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about the Antarctic Beech picnic area.

Getting there and parking

Antarctic Beech picnic area is in the Brindle Creek precinct of Border Ranges National Park. To get there:

From Murwillumbah:

  • Travel south-west on Kyogle Road to Lillian Rock, then turn right onto Williams Road.
  • Travel 2.7km along Williams Road to Creegans Road. Travel 5.8km along Creegans Road to the park boundary.
  • From the park boundary, continue 26km along Tweed Range Scenic Drive to the Brindle Creek Road intersection, which is clearly signposted to your right.
  • Travel 6.8km along Brindle Creek Road to the Antarctic Beech picnic area carpark

From Lismore:

  • Travel north to Nimbin, then continue north on Blue Knob Road to Kyogle-Murwillumbah Road.
  • Turn left (west) towards Kyogle, continue for 5km to Williams Road, then turn right onto Williams Road.
  • Travel 2.7km along Williams Road to Creegans Road. Travel 5.8km along Creegans Road to the park boundary. From the park boundary, continue 26km along Tweed Range Scenic Drive to the Brindle Creek Road intersection, which is clearly signposted to your right.
  • Travel 6.8km along Brindle Creek Road to the Antarctic Beech picnic area carpark

From Kyogle:

  • Travel north along Summerland Way 14km to Wiangaree
  • At Wiangaree, turn right onto Lynchs Creek Road and travel east along Lynches Creek Road 12km to Forest Road, following the signs to Border Ranges National Park.
  • Turn right onto Forest Road and continue 4.5km to the park boundary.  From here, continue on Tweed Range Scenic Drive for 6.6km to Brindle Creek Road, which is clearly signposted on your left.
  • Travel 6.8km along Brindle Creek Road to the Antarctic Beech picnic area carpark

Road quality

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles (no long vehicle access)

Weather restrictions

  • 4WD required in wet weather

Parking

Parking is available on gravel Antarctic Beech Loop Road. Access to the start of the walking track is directly opposite.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Border Ranges National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

A picnic at Border Loop lookout and picnic area is a must during autumn. It's also a popular spot to see the historic Border Loop railway line.

Spring

The perfect time to get away from it all on a family camping trip. Sheepstation Creek campground is a great base for exploring Border Ranges National Park.

Summer

Watching the sunrise from Pinnacle lookout offers the best views of the crater escarpment, Wollumbin-Mount Warning and the coast. You're bound to find it a breathtaking experience.

Winter

Take in the park's scenery from the comfort of your car or motor home as you drive along the Tweed Range Scenic drive. Be sure to take some breaks along the way though – you don't want to miss the views.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

18°C and 30°C

Highest recorded

42.9°C

Winter temperature

Average

8°C and 22°C

Lowest recorded

-0.3°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

February

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

321mm

Facilities

Toilets

There's a timber ramp to the toilet entrance that has handrails on both sides.

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Step-free access

The picnic area is flat and step-free, but there are no pathways. You'll need to cross over flat grass to reach the facilities.

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Accessibility

Disability access level - medium

Antarctic Beech picnic area is flat and step-free, but there are no pathways. People with reduced mobility may need assistance to get across the flat grass surface of the picnic area.

There are:

  • Accessible toilets that have a timber ramp with handrails leading up to the entrance
  • Accessible picnic tables

Prohibited

Gathering firewood

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

Antarctic Beech picnic area is in Border Ranges National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Aboriginal heritage

Pinnacle lookout, Border Ranges National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer

The dramatic landscapes of the Border Ranges National Park echo the historical ties connecting the region's Aboriginal people to Country. The Githabul People trace their identity and spirituality to this Country and it is central to their Dreaming. The park protects many ancient sites and continues to be a place of great significance today.

Abundant wildlife

Peron's tree frog (Litoria peroni), Border Ranges. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

Being part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area, makes this park a truly special place to visit. This region has the highest concentration of marsupial, bird, snake and frog species in Australia, so you're bound to come across a cute creature or two during your visit. While you're in the heart of this remarkable rainforest make sure you listen out for the call of the Alberts lyrebird, and while you're picnicking, keep your eye out for the rare, local fauna that thrive in this lush, protected wilderness.

  • Border Loop walk Walk the short and easy Border Loop walk through World Heritage-listed rainforest. Enjoy spectacular views from the lookout and finish with a picnic at the end.
  • Border Ranges 360 experiences Discover some of the rare and remarkable animals, plants and habitats that make Border Ranges National Park special, with our interactive 360-degree images.

Picture perfect

Brindle Creek walking track, Border Ranges National Park. Photo: John Spencer

A landscape photographer's dream, you'll be spoilt for choice in trying to capture the sheer scale and beauty of this epic rainforest from the many lookouts dotted throughout the park. Be sure to carry your camera up to the Pinnacle lookout at sunrise for a breathtaking birds-eye view of the crater escarpment all the way down to the NSW coastline. Don't forget to change your camera setting to panoramic for the perfect mantelpiece shot.

World Heritage wonder

Brindle Creek walking track, Border Ranges National Park. Photo: John Spencer

The rainforests of the Border Ranges National Park are part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. World Heritage Areas are irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration - places of such value that the international community has agreed they must be conserved for all time. You can explore this World Heritage-listed rainforest on one of the many walking tracks, like the short Pinnacle walk that provides spectacular views of Wollumbin and the Tweed Valley 1km below.

  • Bar Mountain circuit Take the short and easy Bar Mountain circuit walk to the lookout where you’ll enjoy panoramic views of World Heritage-listed rainforest.
  • Border Loop walk Walk the short and easy Border Loop walk through World Heritage-listed rainforest. Enjoy spectacular views from the lookout and finish with a picnic at the end.
  • Border Ranges 360 experiences Discover some of the rare and remarkable animals, plants and habitats that make Border Ranges National Park special, with our interactive 360-degree images.
  • Brindle Creek picnic area Pack up a picnic and set off along the Tweed Range Scenic drive to explore Border Ranges National Park. Stop off at Brindle Creek picnic area for a picnic and walk.

Plants and animals protected in this park

Animals

  • Profile view of an Albert's lyrebird looking for insects amongst leaf litter on the forest floor. Photo: Gavin Phillips © Gavin Phillips

    Albert's lyrebird (Menura alberti)

    The Albert’s lyrebird is much rarer than the superb lyrebird. Distinguished by its richer brown plumage and less elaborate tail feathers, it’s protected as a threatened species in NSW.

  • A spotted-tailed quoll walks across a moss-covered forest floor at night. Photo: Lachlan Hall © Lachlan Hall

    Spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus)

    The spotted-tailed quoll is the largest remaining carnivorous marsupial on the Australian mainland. It’s protected as a vulnerable species in NSW.

  • A male satin bowerbird with black plumage and blue eyes stands in a bower made of brown twigs. Photo: Peter Sherratt © Peter Sherratt

    Satin bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus)

    With vibrant blue-violet eyes and curious antics, the satin bowerbird is a favourite for bird watching and easy to spot as it forages for food in open forest. Relatively common across eastern Australia, in NSW they’re found in coastal rainforests and adjacent woodlands and mountain ranges.

  • Profile view of a wompoo fruit-dove on a tree branch with red berries. Photo: John Turbill © John Turbill

    Wompoo fruit-dove (Ptilinopus magnificus)

    The wompoo fruit-dove is a marvellously multi-coloured pigeon that makes its home in rainforest along coastal ranges from mid-north NSW to southern Queensland. It’s protected as a vulnerable species in NSW.

  • Profile view of a rufous scrub-bird (Atrichornis rufescens) standing on a mossy rock. Glen Trelfo © Glen Trelfo

    Rufous scrub-bird (Atrichornis rufescens)

    The vulnerable rufous scrub-bird is a small, ground-foraging bird that lives only in isolated rainforest areas of south-eastern Australia.

  • Eastern common ringtail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus)

    Commonly found in forests, woodlands and leafy gardens across eastern NSW, the Australian ringtail possum is a tree-dwelling marsupial. With a powerful tail perfectly adapted to grasp objects, it forages in trees for eucalypt leaves, flowers and fruit.

  • Long-nosed bandicoot, Sydney Harbour National Park. Photo: Narelle King

    Long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta)

    A nocturnal marsupial and one of the smaller Australian native animals, the long-nosed bandicoot is found across eastern Australia. Populations in the Sydney region have dwindled since European settlement, leaving only endangered colonies in inner western Sydney and at North Head, near Manly. The long-nosed bandicoot has grey-brown fur and a pointed snout which it uses to forage for worms and insects.

  • Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell

    Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    One of the most renowned Australian animals, the tree-dwelling marsupial koala can be found in gum tree forests and woodlands across eastern NSW, Victoria and Queensland, as well as in isolated regions in South Australia. With a vice-like grip, this perhaps most iconic but endangered Australian animal lives in tall eucalypts within a home range of several hectares.

  • Profile view of a Fleay's barred frog on a rock surrounded by leaf litter. Photo: Peter Higgins © DPE

    Fleay's barred frog (Mixophyes fleayi)

    The Fleay’s barred frog is an endangered species restricted to rainforest stream habitats in north-east NSW and south-east Queensland.

  • Profile view of an eastern bristlebird on the ground amongst grassy habitat, it's beak open during birdsong. Photo: Leo Berzins © Leo Berzins

    Eastern bristlebird (Dasyornis brachypterus)

    The endangered eastern bristlebird is a shy, ground-dwelling songbird. Less than 2,500 birds are left in the wild, restricted to 3 isolated areas in eastern NSW and southern Queensland.

Plants

  • Grass trees, Sugarloaf State Conservation Area. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    Grass tree (Xanthorrea spp.)

    An iconic part of the Australian landscape, the grass tree is widespread across eastern NSW. These Australian native plants have a thick fire-blackened trunk and long spiked leaves. They are found in heath and open forests across eastern NSW. The grass tree grows 1-5m in height and produces striking white-flowered spikes which grow up to 1m long.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)