Black Rocks campground

Bundjalung National Park

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Overview

Black Rocks campground is a great place for a family camping holiday, near Evans Head on the NSW north coast.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 50
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Caravan site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, carpark, toilets
What to bring Drinking water, firewood
Price
  • Rates and availability are displayed when making an online booking
  • $24 per night (includes 2 people). Additional adult $12, child (5-15yrs) $6, infants (0-4yrs) free.
  • Black Rocks and Yabra Group Areas: $144 per night (includes 12 people). Additional adult $12, child (5-15yrs) $6, infants (0-4yrs) free.
  • Booroora Group Area: $120 per night (includes 10 people). Additional adult $12, child (5-15yrs) $6, infants (0-4yrs) free.
Entry fees

Park entry fees are not included in your camping fees.

Bookings Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • Check in after 2pm, check out before 10am.
  • A maximum of 4 sites may be reserved per customer
  • This is a remote campground so please arrive well prepared
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Set behind the dunes amongst tuckeroo and banksia trees, Black Rocks campground is perfectly positioned right by Ten Mile Beach and near Jerusalem Creek. Not far from Evans Head, it is a great place for a family camping holiday, with campsites for caravans, camper trailers and motorhomes.

Getting to the beach is easy along the short walking track that leads you north along creek banks and through wetlands to the mouth of the ocean. Jerusalem Creek paddle route offers excellent opportunities for paddling—you can launch your canoe or kayak from the pontoon and camp the night at Jerusalem Creek or return to the main campground. Go at dawn or dusk to increase your chances of spotting animals and birds.

In the evening, you can cook up a tasty barbecue dinner, and there are a number of picnic tables throughout the campground.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/black-rocks-campground/local-alerts

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Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Black Rocks campground.

Getting there and parking

Black Rocks campground is in the Black Rocks precinct of Bundjalung National Park. To get there: 

  • Access to Black Rocks campground is via Tuckombil Road and The Gap Road, near the town of Woodburn.
  • The turnoff to Tuckombil Road is 2km south of the southern end of the town of Woodburn.
  • Follow Tuckombil Road south for 1.8km, then turn left onto The Gap Road.
  • Black Rocks campground is 20km south along The Gap Road.
  • Please drive slowly along The Gap Road because it's unsealed. Follow the speed limit around the campground for the safety of other campers. Take care on speed bumps, especially if you have a vehicle with low clearance.

Road quality

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

  • Parking is available on your campsite for tent or vehicle-based campsites.
  • Tent only sites 30-33: Parking is available in the carpark about 30-50m from campsites.
  • Group sites: Parking is available next to your group campsite.
  • Jerusalem Creek sites: This is a remote camping area, campers must park their vehicles in the main Black Rocks campground (4km walk).

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Bundjalung National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Spring

Head to Iluka Bluff for a spectacular coastal view of the park, beaches and the mouth of the river – keep your eyes peeled for whales on their return migration.

Winter

Escape to the wintersun for a family camping holiday, it should still be warm enough for a swim so remember to bring your cozzie.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

20°C and 26°C

Highest recorded

42.5°C

Winter temperature

Average

12°C and 21°C

Lowest recorded

2.7°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

Between January and March

Driest month

Between August and October

Facilities

  • Campsites are marked and suitable for motorhomes, caravans, camper trailers, campervans and tents. Sites are unpowered.
  • There are 3 exclusive group camp areas: Black Rocks, Booroora and Yabra.
  • There are 2 remote tent-only campsites in Jerusalem Creek, located 4km from the main campground. The sites are accessible by taking the Jerusalem Creek walk, or by paddling downstream along Jerusalem Creek (non-powered craft or silent electric motors only). There are fire rings and picnic tables only in this area so campers should be self-reliant.
  • Canoe launching pontoon
  • Dump Ezy for caravans
  • Clothes line
  • Power, showers, water and rubbish bins are not available.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

There are fire rings with hotplate on each individual campsite. Group campsites each have a fire pit. Gas/electric barbecues are also available in the campground.

  • Gas/electric barbecues (free)
  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Beach safety

Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Paddling safety

To make your paddling or kayaking adventure safer and more enjoyable, check out these paddling safety tips.

Accessibility

Disability access level - easy

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Spear fishing is not permitted and spearguns may not be brought into the campground 

Prohibited

  • Amplified music is not permitted.
  • Glass is prohibited in watercrafts or campsites at the Jerusalem Creek sites. 

Gathering firewood

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Ballina (43 km)

Ballina is a bustling holiday town and service centre and home of the Big Prawn. It's situated at the mouth of the Richmond River, close to superb beaches.

www.visitnsw.com

Evans Head (15 km)

Evans Head is a peaceful, coastal fishing village located on the banks of the Evans River.

www.visitnsw.com

Yamba (19 km)

Yamba is a bustling holiday resort with a large fishing fleet. It's built around a headland at the mouth of the Clarence River.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Black Rocks campground is in Bundjalung National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

An ancient landscape

Gummigurrah walking track, Bundjalung National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

At Bundjalung National Park you can visit Gummigurrah, an area that was used as a winter camping ground by the Bandjalung People. This park is one of a group where the Bandjalang People's native title rights have been recognised and is only the third determination of native title rights in New South Wales. Native title rights come from the Bandjalang People's traditional laws and customs and legally recognise the Bandjalang People's connection to Country. This means that these lands will continue to be places of ceremony, learning and inspiration for generations to come.

  • Gummigurrah walking track Situated near Evans Head in Bundjalung National Park, Gummigurrah walking track winds through rainforest and heathlands, offering birdwatching and scenic river views.

Meet the locals

Silver banksia (Banksia marginata), Bundjalung National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

The varied habitat of Bundjalung National Park is home to over 140 species of fauna. Wake to the morning melodies of eastern whip-birds, bower birds and the rare barred cuckoo-shrike. At dawn and dusk, you might find eastern grey kangaroos, red-necked wallabies and swamp wallabies congregating around your campsites. Scour the tops of nearby trees and you might also catch a glimpse of a sleeping koala or two.

  • Iluka Bluff lookout Stay as long as you like to enjoy the views at Iluka Bluff lookout, near Yamba. Not only is it an excellent whale watching spot, it’s also a great place to picnic.
  • Jerusalem Creek walk Keep your eyes peeled for birds nesting along the creek along the Jerusalem Creek walk. Enjoy the hike as a day walk or shorter walk and finish up with a picnic lunch.

Water world

Black Rocks campground, Bundjalung National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

Bundjalung protects a variety of environments that feature water, including beaches, rivers, wetlands and lagoons. You'll find different types of plants, animals and birds in each one; look for coast banksia, coast she-oak and coastal wattle on the dunes that back onto the beach. Immerse yourself in this world by canoeing the waterways, rambling in the rock pools and swimming in the ocean.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • White-bellied sea eagle. Photo: John Turbill

    White-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster)

    White-bellied sea eagles can be easily identified by their white tail and dark grey wings. These raptors are often spotted cruising the coastal breezes throughout Australia, and make for some scenic bird watching. Powerful Australian birds of prey, they are known to mate for life, and return each year to the same nest to breed.

  • Peron's tree frog. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Peron's tree frog (Litoria peroni)

    Peron’s tree frog is found right across NSW. These tree-climbing and ground-dwelling Australian animals can quickly change colour, ranging from pale green-grey by day, to a reddish brown with emerald green flecks at night. The male frog has a drill-like call, which has been described as a 'maniacal cackle’.

  • Emu, Paroo Darling National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

    The largest of Australian birds, the emu stands up to 2m high and is the second largest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Emus live in pairs or family groups. The male emu incubates and rears the young, which will stay with the adult emus for up to 2 years.

  • Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell

    Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    One of the most renowned Australian animals, the tree-dwelling marsupial koala can be found in gum tree forests and woodlands across eastern NSW, Victoria and Queensland, as well as in isolated regions in South Australia. With a vice-like grip, this perhaps most iconic but endangered Australian animal lives in tall eucalypts within a home range of several hectares.

  • Lace monitor, Daleys Point walking track, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    Lace monitor (Varanus varius)

    One of Australia’s largest lizards, the carnivorous tree-dwelling lace monitor, or tree goanna, can grow to 2m in length and is found in forests and coastal tablelands across eastern Australia. These Australian animals are typically dark blue in colour with whitish spots or blotches.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

Rocks in the ocean. Photo: Rob Cleary