Guula Ngurra National Park

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Overview

With its remote rural setting, peaceful surrounds and significant Aboriginal culture, you can form a deep connection with Country in Guula Ngurra National Park, near Moss Vale.

Read more about Guula Ngurra National Park

The name Guula Ngurra was provided by the Gundungurra People, and can be translated as Koala Country. This name embodies the spirit of Guula Ngurra National Park, which helps connect visitors with Country and provides important habitat for koalas. ‘Guula’ is the word for koala and ‘Ngurra’ (Country) has a deep meaning of belonging. ‘Ngurra’ takes in everything within the physical, cultural and spiritual landscape – landforms, waters, plants, animals, foods, medicines, stories and people; past, present and future.

Located close to Moss Vale, Berrima and Mittagong, Guula Ngurra National Park is an easy stop along your Southern Highlands road trip. As you explore the park’s varied environments you’ll marvel at the range of biodiversity on display. With its sandstone ridges and overhangs, red gum slopes, heath-woodland, river flats and caves, the park provides important habitat to a wide variety of animals, including the endangered glossy-black cockatoo.

If you’re an experienced adventurer you’ll love exploring the park’s landscape on foot, tackling its challenging bushwalks and hiking to its peaks. And with a range of lookouts on offer you’re spoilt for choice when it comes to expansive views.

Guula Ngurra National Park is also an ideal place for you to connect with Aboriginal culture and immerse yourself in Country. The meeting point of the Wollondilly and Wingecarribee rivers in particular, on the northern boundary of the park, is part of the Creation Story in which Mirragan fought Gurangatch, and has great significance in Aboriginal culture.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/guula-ngurra-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

  • in the Country NSW region
  • The Mount Penang and Little Forest West areas of Guula Ngurra National Park are always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

    The Tugalong area of Guula Ngurra National Park is open to the public from 8:30am to 5pm on the first weekend of each month (Saturday and Sunday) between 1 March and 30 October. The area is closed to the public at other times to protect sensitive natural and cultural heritage values.

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Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Guula Ngurra National Park.

Nearby towns

Berrima (50km km)

Berrima is full to the brim with Australian colonial heritage - from its sandstone buildings and historic courthouse to Australia's oldest licensed pub. Who knows, you might even encounter a ghost here.

www.visitnsw.com

Mittagong (62km km)

Mittagong has a fine collection of sandstone buildings dating from the early years of European settlement in the mid-19th century. Stroll along Main and Victoria streets to see fine country homes, delightful gardens and specialty shops.

www.visitnsw.com

Moss Vale (53km km)

Moss Vale is the rural centre of the Southern Highlands, with its regional livestock saleyards, farmers market and agricultural show. The meandering tree-lined main street and lush gardens make it one of the most picturesque towns in the region.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Guula Ngurra National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Australian brush turkey, Dorrigo National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Australian brush turkey (Alectura lathami)

    The Australian brush turkey, also known as bush or scrub turkey, can be found in rainforests along eastern NSW. With a striking red head, blue-black plumage and booming call, these distinctive Australian birds are easy to spot while bird watching in several NSW national parks.

  • Brush tail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    One of the most widespread of Australian tree-dwelling marsupials, the common brushtail possum is found across most of NSW in woodlands, rainforests and urban areas. With strong claws, a prehensile tail and opposable digits, these native Australian animals are well-adapted for life amongst the trees.

  • Eastern common ringtail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus)

    Commonly found in forests, woodlands and leafy gardens across eastern NSW, the Australian ringtail possum is a tree-dwelling marsupial. With a powerful tail perfectly adapted to grasp objects, it forages in trees for eucalypt leaves, flowers and fruit.

  • Common wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

    Common wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian common wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • Emu, Paroo Darling National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

    The largest of Australian birds, the emu stands up to 2m high and is the second largest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Emus live in pairs or family groups. The male emu incubates and rears the young, which will stay with the adult emus for up to 2 years.

  • Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell

    Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    One of the most renowned Australian animals, the tree-dwelling marsupial koala can be found in gum tree forests and woodlands across eastern NSW, Victoria and Queensland, as well as in isolated regions in South Australia. With a vice-like grip, this perhaps most iconic but endangered Australian animal lives in tall eucalypts within a home range of several hectares.

  • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

    Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

    Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

  • A juvenile platypus saved by National Parks and Wildlife staff. Photo: M Bannerman/OEH

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

    One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Red kangaroo, Sturt National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    The red kangaroo is one of the most iconic Australian animals and the largest marsupial in the world. Large males have reddish fur and can reach a height of 2m, while females are considerably smaller and have blue-grey fur. Red kangaroos are herbivores and mainly eat grass.

  • Echidna. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

    One of only 2 egg-laying mammals in the world, the short-beaked echidna is one of the most widespread of Australian native animals. Covered in spines, or quills, they’re equipped with a keen sense of smell and a tube-like snout which they use to break apart termite mounds in search of ants.

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

  • Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Photo: Peter Sherratt

    Yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

    The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is one of the largest species of parrot. With dusty-black plumage, they have a yellow tail and cheek patch. They’re easily spotted while bird watching, as they feed on seeds in native forests and pine plantations.

Plants

  • Grass trees, Sugarloaf State Conservation Area. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    Grass tree (Xanthorrea spp.)

    An iconic part of the Australian landscape, the grass tree is widespread across eastern NSW. These Australian native plants have a thick fire-blackened trunk and long spiked leaves. They are found in heath and open forests across eastern NSW. The grass tree grows 1-5m in height and produces striking white-flowered spikes which grow up to 1m long.

  • River red gum, Murrumbidgee Valley National Park. Photo: Paul Childs

    River red gum (Eucalpytus camaldulensis)

    Australian native plants, majestic river red gum trees are widespread across Australian inland river systems. The river red gum is a dominant tree species of the Murray-Darling basin which spans NSW, Queensland and Victoria. This iconic native eucalypt grows to a height of 30m and is thought to have a lifespan up to 500-1000 years.

Environments in this park

What we're doing

Guula Ngurra National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents.