Blue Gum Hills Regional Park

Overview

Blue Gum Hills Regional Park is a great family day out. Learn about the park's mining heritage on a school excursion, or enjoy a barbecue in peaceful bushland, and then explore the maze, walking tracks or mountain biking trails.

Read more about Blue Gum Hills Regional Park

Blue Gum Hills Regional Park provides a delightful day out for Newcastle residents and visitors. In a protected bushland setting, your family and friends can enjoy barbecue areas, play equipment, a maze and plenty of green space to refresh the soul. If you’re feeling active after lunch you can play cricket, go bike riding down one of the many trails or enjoy one of the easy-access walking tracks to check out the mining heritage of the park. As this is a dog-friendly park, you can take your dog for a walk, as long as they’re on a leash.

Don’t miss the TreeTop Adventure Park if you feel like getting right up into the forest canopy.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/blue-gum-hills-regional-park/local-alerts

Contact

  • in the North Coast region
  • Blue Gum Hills Regional Park is open 7.30am to 8pm during daylight savings (7.30am to 5pm at other times), but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

  • More
See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Blue Gum Hills Regional Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Newcastle, travel towards Wallsend and follow Minmi Road to Minmi village. The park entry gates will be on your lefts, approximately 500m before the village.

    To access the park from the F3, take the Newcastle Link road exit and turn left onto Woodford Street. Turn right into Minmi Road at the lights and you'll see the park entry gates on the right about 500m along Minmi Road.

    Park entry points

    Parking

    Road quality

    • Sealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Weather restrictions

    • All weather

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW for more information.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting fopr you in Blue Gum Hills National Park. Here are some highlights.

    Autumn

    A great time for cycling and walking as it cools down after the summer months.

    Spring

    The weather is beautiful and fresh; perfect for a spot of walking or cycling.

    Summer

    The picnic and barbecue areas offer lots of shade so it's a good time to visit to escape the heat.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    20°C and 28°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    10°C and 18°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    December, January

    Driest month

    July

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Walkers, cyclists and horseriders should remain on recognised tracks and trails as there are areas in the park that are subject to mine subsidence.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Permitted

    Pets

    You can walk your dog on a leash at this location. See other regional parks in NSW that have dog walking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Warners Bay (16 km)

    Warners Bay offers a great lifestyle with a vibrant cultural precinct. It's a pretty lakeside suburb.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Newcastle (18 km)

    Newcastle is a harbour city surrounded by amazing surf beaches that are linked by a great coastal walk, the Bathers Way. The walk from Nobbys Beach to Merewether Beach takes about three hours and is a great way to explore the city.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Cessnock (33 km)

    Some of the finest wines in the world are created in the Hunter Valley and its towns, gourmet food is acclaimed and luxury, boutique accommodations are matched by the most beautiful natural scenery.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Blue Gum Hills Regional Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Learn about the area's mining history

    Heritage walking track, Blue Gum Hills Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    From the middle of the 19th century right up to the 1980's, much of the area of Blue Gum Hills Regional Park was used for mining, mostly Newcastle's famous black coal. You will see evidence of the park's mining history in its unusual topography, undulations and scars are still a feature of the landscape. There is so much to discover about the park's mining history, start by walking the easy Heritage Track which features an historic 1870's chimney, one of the few in good condition in NSW. This park is a fascinating work-in-progress, undergoing rejuvenation and transformation into the beautiful bushland setting much of the park already enjoys.

    • Heritage walking track Join the Heritage walking track for a glimpse into the park’s mining history. This short walk follows the old rail embankment to a ventilation shaft from the 1870s.
    • Minmi Cemetery walk Take this gentle walk to Minmi Cemetery, a charming historic site that dates back to the coal-mining boom of the mid-1800s.

    The kids will love it too

    Yellow tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus), Blue Gum Hills Regional Park. Photo: Peter Sherratt

    For the kids there’s a maze, a cool mine-themed playground, easy bush tracks for biking and burning off energy and the flying foxes and rope challenges of the TreeTop Adventure Park. And while they’re getting back to nature, see if they can spot the yellow tailed black cockatoo, with its huge, bulbous bill and bright yellow ear feathers and tail panel, and the masked owl, 50cm long, with a flat, heart-shaped face encircled by a dark border.

    Stacks to do

    Tree Top Adventure Park, Blue Gum Hills Regional Park. Photo: Tree Top Adventure Park

    The local community has already discovered just how much there is to do at Blue Gum Hills Regional Park, and everyone’s welcome. You can make the most of the wide open spaces, pretty bushland setting and picnic and barbecue facilities, to spend the day bushwalking, cycling, orienteering, picnicking, horse-riding, playing ball games or simply reconnecting with the bush.

    • TreeTops Newcastle Challenge yourself on a high ropes course in the forest canopy at TreeTops Newcastle. Adults and kids can choose from over 100 elevated obstacles including rope ladders, wobbly bridges and zip lines.
    • Village Green picnic area With picnic table, barbecues, mountain biking trails, an adventure playground and bushland setting, Village Green picnic area is ideal for families and large groups.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

      Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

      Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

    • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Ingo Oeland

      Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

      The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    School excursions (4)

    What we're doing

    Blue Gum Hills Regional Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

    Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

    Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Blue Gum Hills Regional Park. Risk assessments for new and emerging weeds are carried out as an ongoing initiative within the park. Pest management is an important part of the work NPWS does to protect the integrity of biodiversity which exists within Blue Gum Hills.

    Conservation program

    Regional pest management strategies

    Weeds and pest animals cause substantial damage to agriculture and our environment, so it’s essential we manage them in NSW national parks and reserves. Our regional pest management strategies aim to minimise the impact of pests on biodiversity in NSW.  We work hard to protect our parks and neighbours from pests and weeds, ensuring measurable results.

    Historic heritage in our parks and reserves

    Blue Gum Hills Regional Park is known for its mining history. Heritage sites within the park receive ongoing conservation work to preserve it for years to come. Improvements to national park walking tracks are also carried out. Blue Gum Hills Regional Park undertakes routine maintenance and upgrading of all its facilities.

    Developing visitor facilities and experiences

    Blue Gum Hills Regional Park values the visitor experience of the area and encourages use of all facilities. Part of park management priorities includes ongoing work to develop new walking tracks and install interpretative signage.

    Managing fire

    NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

    Conservation program

    Planning for fire

    Bushfires are inevitable across fire-prone vegetation types within NSW national parks. NPWS prepares for wildfires by working with other fire agencies, reserve neighbours and the community to ensure protection of life, property and biodiversity. Every park has its own fire management strategy, devised in consultation with partner fire authorities and the community to plan and prioritise fire management.

    Goanna on a tree trunk, Blue Gum Hills Regional Park. Photo: Juhn Yurasek