Red Cedar loop

Border Ranges National Park

Overview

Red Cedar loop, in Border Ranges National Park, is a short easy rainforest walk leading to a giant red cedar tree. There are birdwatching opportunities along the way.

Where
Border Ranges National Park
Distance
0.75km loop
Time suggested
20 - 40min
Grade
Grade 2
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • It’s a good idea to fill your fuel tank before heading out to the park as the closest service stations are Kyogle, Woodenbong, Nimbin and Rathdowney.
  • The weather in the area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well prepared for your visit.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go birdwatching

Go for a wander in the bush through Red Cedar loop and be rewarded with a grand finale. The scenic walking track leads you to the foot of a 48m red cedar tree. It’s a sight to behold and possibly 1000 years old. Look for epiphytes growing on the bark, such as bird’s nest fern, orchid and staghorn.

Cedars often grow close to creek lines, which made them easy pickings for the early European settlers who used flooded creeks and rivers to float the logs down to waiting ships and saw mills. This particular one was lucky enough to not be too close to the water’s edge.

Enjoy bushwalking along the short and easy track with friends, family or take some time out alone to fully appreciate your surroundings. If Red Cedar loop whets your appetite for more walking then stretch your legs a little further to nearby Helmholtzia loop.

Take a virtual tour of Red Ceder loop captured with Google Street View Trekker.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/red-cedar-loop/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Red Cedar loop.

Track grading

Grade 2

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    20 - 40min

  • Quality of markings

    Clearly sign posted

  • Gradient

    Flat

  • Distance

    0.75km loop

  • Steps

    Occasional steps

  • Quality of path

    Formed track

  • Experience required

    No experience required

Getting there and parking

Red Cedar loop is in the eastern precinct of Border Ranges National Park. To get there:

  • Travel north from Kyogle along Summerland Way for 14km until you reach Wiangaree
  • At Wiangaree turn right onto Lynches Creek Road and travel east for 12km to Forest Road
  • Turn right onto Forest Road and continue 4.5km to Border Ranges park boundary
  • Continue on Tweed Range Scenic Drive for 6.5km to Brindle Road, which is clearly signposted on the left.
  • Travel nearly 2km along Brindle Creek Road to Brindle Creek carpark

Buses (no more than 22 passengers) and trailers over 7m are not permitted on Tweed Range Scenic Drive.

Parking

Parking is available at Brindle Creek where the walk begins.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Border Ranges National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

A picnic at Border Loop lookout and picnic area is a must during autumn. It's also a popular spot to see the historic Border Loop railway line.

Spring

The perfect time to get away from it all on a family camping trip. Sheepstation Creek campground is a great base for exploring Border Ranges National Park.

Summer

Watching the sunrise from Pinnacle lookout offers the best views of the crater escarpment, Wollumbin-Mount Warning and the coast. You're bound to find it a breathtaking experience.

Winter

Take in the park's scenery from the comfort of your car or motor home as you drive along the Tweed Range Scenic drive. Be sure to take some breaks along the way though – you don't want to miss the views.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

18°C and 30°C

Highest recorded

42.9°C

Winter temperature

Average

8°C and 22°C

Lowest recorded

-0.3°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

February

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

321mm

Facilities

  • Toilets are located at Brindle Creek
  • Drinking water is limited or not available in this area, so it’s a good idea to bring your own.
  • You’re encouraged to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during the fire season.

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

This park or attraction is in a remote location, so please ensure you’re well prepared, bring appropriate clothing and equipment and advise a family member or friend of your travel plans.

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Kyogle (30 km)

Kyogle is an attractive timber-milling town surrounded by rainforest. It's set on the Richmond River at the base of Fairy Mountain.

www.visitnsw.com

Mullumbimby (40 km)

Mullumbimby sits on the Brunswick River and is overshadowed by subtropical hills.

www.visitnsw.com

Murwillumbah (39 km)

Murwillumbah is rich dairy, sugar cane and banana country. It's located on the banks of the Tweed River and set in the Tweed River Valley against a backdrop of rainforest-clad hills.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Red Cedar loop is in Border Ranges National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Aboriginal heritage

Pinnacle lookout, Border Ranges National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer

The dramatic landscapes of the Border Ranges National Park echo the historical ties connecting the region's Aboriginal people to Country. The Githabul People trace their identity and spirituality to this Country and it is central to their Dreaming. The park protects many ancient sites and continues to be a place of great significance today.

Abundant wildlife

Peron's tree frog (Litoria peroni), Border Ranges. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

Being part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area, makes this park a truly special place to visit. This region has the highest concentration of marsupial, bird, snake and frog species in Australia, so you're bound to come across a cute creature or two during your visit. While you're in the heart of this remarkable rainforest make sure you listen out for the call of the Alberts lyrebird, and while you're picnicking, keep your eye out for the rare, local fauna that thrive in this lush, protected wilderness.

  • Border loop walk Walk the short and easy Border loop walk through World Heritage-listed rainforest. Enjoy spectacular views from the lookout and finish with a picnic at the end.

Picture perfect

Brindle Creek walking track, Border Ranges National Park. Photo: John Spencer

A landscape photographer's dream, you'll be spoilt for choice in trying to capture the sheer scale and beauty of this epic rainforest from the many lookouts dotted throughout the park. Be sure to carry your camera up to the Pinnacle lookout at sunrise for a breathtaking birds-eye view of the crater escarpment all the way down to the NSW coastline. Don't forget to change your camera setting to panoramic for the perfect mantelpiece shot.

World Heritage wonder

Brindle Creek walking track, Border Ranges National Park. Photo: John Spencer

The rainforests of the Border Ranges National Park are part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. World Heritage Areas are irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration - places of such value that the international community has agreed they must be conserved for all time. You can explore this World Heritage-listed rainforest on one of the many walking tracks, like the short Pinnacle walk that provides spectacular views of Wollumbin and the Tweed Valley 1km below.

  • Bar Mountain circuit Take the short and easy Bar Mountain circuit walk to the lookout where you’ll enjoy panoramic views of World Heritage-listed rainforest.
  • Border loop walk Walk the short and easy Border loop walk through World Heritage-listed rainforest. Enjoy spectacular views from the lookout and finish with a picnic at the end.
  • Brindle Creek picnic area Pack up a picnic and set off along the Tweed Range Scenic drive to explore Border Ranges National Park. Stop off at Brindle Creek picnic area for a picnic and walk.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Satin bowerbird. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Satin bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus)

    With vibrant blue-violet eyes and curious antics, the satin bowerbird is a favourite for bird watching and easy to spot as it forages for food in open forest. Relatively common across eastern Australia, in NSW they’re found in coastal rainforests and adjacent woodlands and mountain ranges.

  • Eastern common ringtail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus)

    Commonly found in forests, woodlands and leafy gardens across eastern NSW, the Australian ringtail possum is a tree-dwelling marsupial. With a powerful tail perfectly adapted to grasp objects, it forages in trees for eucalypt leaves, flowers and fruit.

  • Long-nosed bandicoot, Sydney Harbour National Park. Photo: Narelle King

    Long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta)

    A nocturnal marsupial and one of the smaller Australian native animals, the long-nosed bandicoot is found across eastern Australia. Populations in the Sydney region have dwindled since European settlement, leaving only endangered colonies in inner western Sydney and at North Head, near Manly. The long-nosed bandicoot has grey-brown fur and a pointed snout which it uses to forage for worms and insects.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

Red Cedar loop, Border Ranges National Park. Photo: John Spencer