Presbyterian church

Hill End Historic Site

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Overview

Hill End’s heritage Presbyterian Church is a historical example of religious congregation and the importance of religion in gold mining communities in Hill End in the late 1800s.

Type
Historic buildings/places
Where
34 Tambaroora Street, Hill End, NSW, 2850 - in Hill End Historic Site
Opening times

A service is held at 2pm on the fourth Sunday of each month.

Please note
Contact the Presbyterian church directly for more information on 02 6372 0404.

Hill End’s heritage Presbyterian Church is a beautiful example of religious architecture of the late 1800s. It also demonstrates how religion played an important part in the gold mining communities of that time.

While the church is of Gothic design, the inclusion of Romanesque details makes it distinctive and beautiful. The inclusion of the thistle motif in the church’s doorway symbolises the strong Scottish support for the Presbyterian faith.

Once you’ve had a stroll around the church, be sure to visit the Hill End Heritage Centre to discover more about the heritage wealth of Hill End’s mining legacy
.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Map


Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/historic-buildings-places/presbyterian-church/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Presbyterian church.

Getting there and parking

The Presbyterian Church is located at Tambaroora Street, Hill End Historic Site.

To get there from Bathurst, travel 85km north of Bathurst via Sofala (4.5km good unsealed road) or 75km via Eglinton/Turondale along a completely sealed road.

From Mudgee, drive through Hargraves for 75km along a completely sealed road.

Road quality

  • Sealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available on Tambaroora Street, a short walk from the Presbyterian Church.

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Accessibility

Wheelchairs can access this area with some difficulty

Prohibited

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

Presbyterian church is in Hill End Historic Site. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A past to cherish

Beyers Cottage, Hill End Historic Site. Photo: John Spencer

Artists have long gravitated to picturesque Hill End. Since the Second World War the scarred landscape has drawn artists such as Russell Drysdale, Donald Friend, John Olsen and Brett Whiteley to capture the striking scenery on canvas. The Hill End Artist in Residence Program is run by Bathurst Regional Art Gallery and continues this tradition, offering contemporary artists an opportunity to make the pilgrimage to Hill End. Take a walk in the same landscape that has moved so many artists. Please note: Selected works from the program previously on display at the Jean Bellette Gallery in the Visitor’s Centre, will be re-located to a new venue at a date to be advised. 

The gold rush hit nearby Bathurst in 1851 and Hill End, swept up in the frenzy, was settled in 1852. It wasn’t until almost 20 years later, however, that large-scale mining began. After most of the mining population had moved on, it was the Gold Centenary Celebrations in 1951 that were the catalyst for Hill End being recognised for its significant heritage value.

  • Capertee and Hill End 4WD camping tour Explore the stunning sights of Capertee, the Turon River and Hill End on a 4WD camping adventure with Adrenalin Offroad Centre.
  • Cornish Quartz roasting pits The quartz roasting pits are a short drive from Hill End and are a significant historical remnant of Australia’s earlier mining heritage.
  • Denningtons Cottage Denningtons Cottage is a heritage miner’s cottage built in 1858 in Hill End, and now home to ceramic artist studio.
  • Hill End gold 4WD adventures Hop on board a comfortable 4WD vehicle and enjoy a thrilling journey over rugged 4WD trails as you explore the Hill End and Sofala goldfields region. These excursions with Simmo’s Offroad Tours are a great way discover fascinating gold rush history and heritage. 
  • Hill End Heritage Centre Hill End Heritage Centre's interactive museum displays and historic information are the perfect introduction to any visit to Hill End Historic Site.

Mine for gold

Royal Hotel, Hill End Historic Site. Photo: John Spencer

Ever wondered how gold is separated from the rock it’s found in? Or want to know what a steam boiler or battery stamp’s used for? Hill End is full of places where you can learn all about mining gold. Visit the Colonial Gold Mining Company’s roasting kilns and battery buildings, enjoy a barbeque at the grounds of the Historic Hill End Hospital, check out the impressive collection of carriages and work machinery from the gold rush era housed close by, and don’t forget to book one of the many tours available while you’re there to make the most of your visit.

  • Bald Hill tourist mine Experience the underground world of a goldminer at Bald Hill tourist mine. A short walk or drive from Hill End, this guided tour is ideal for families and school groups.
  • Beaufoy Merlin lookout Beaufoy Merlin lookout offers spectacular views and an excellent vantage point to see the true scale of former mining activities. It’s also great for photography.
  • Hill End Heritage Centre Hill End Heritage Centre's interactive museum displays and historic information are the perfect introduction to any visit to Hill End Historic Site.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

    The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)