Special Offer

Mill Creek campground

Dharug National Park

Special Offer

Stay 3, pay 2

Stay 3 nights, pay only 2 nights. Valid for stays between 29 April and 29 November 2019. Excludes NSW school holidays and public holiday weekends. Subject to availability. Book online.


Book now

Overview

Mill Creek campground offers sites for small caravans, campervans, camper trailers and tents. Nestled among trees and surrounded by dramatic sandstone cliffs, this sheltered area makes a great weekend escape.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 31
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Barbecue facilities, carpark, toilets
What to bring Drinking water, cooking water, insect repellent, firewood
Price
  • Rates and availability are displayed when making an online booking
  • A minimum daily rate applies, which includes the first 2 occupants.
  • Group area: A minimum daily rate applies, which includes the first 15 occupants.
  • Minimum 3 night stays apply over Easter
Bookings Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • Check in after 12pm. Check out before 12pm.
  • Sites are marked, unpowered and suitable for up to 6 people.
  • There is an exclusive group camp area for up to 70 people, 500m from the general campground. To book, contact 13000 72757.
  • Singular or multiple bookings may not exceed 21 days.
Book now

Pick a flat, grassy site by the creek and set yourself up amid the rugged sandstone escarpments and dense eucalypt forests. This pretty, sheltered area is loved by birds and wildlife too – you might see wombats, wallaroos, goannas, lyrebirds and tiny sugar gliders and hear the distinctive chiming sound of bellbirds.

Take a short walk to the picnic area where you'll find the start of a number of great bushwalks – experience rainforest and dry eucalypt forest, climb up onto the escarpment or ride along the Old Great North Road, part of the Convict Sites of Australia World Heritage Area.  

Take a virtual tour of Mill Creek campground captured with Google Street View Trekker.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/mill-creek-campground/local-alerts

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Mill Creek campground.

Getting there and parking

Mill Creek campground is located 6.6km east of the Wisemans Ferry crossing, on the north side of the Hawkesbury River in Dharug National Park.

To get there, turn right from the ferry and follow signs for Dharug National Park – Mill Creek campground. Turn left and follow the road for 1.7km to the end, where you’ll find the campground. You can also reach the campground by taking Wisemans Ferry Road from the F3 exits at Calga, Gosford and Peats Ridge.

Road quality

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available at Mill Creek campground.

  • For sites 1 to 8 you can park onsite with your campervan, camper trailer or small caravan (4m/13ft).
  • For other sites, there are parking spaces along the road through the campground, with camping a short distance from your vehicle (20m to 100m).

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Dharug National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

The water has warmed up nicely by late summer so autumn is great for kayaking and canoeing along the Hawkesbury river.

Spring

The spring months are perfect for enjoying more strenuous activities in the park, like the longer walks and mountain bike riding. It's also the perfect time to see wildflowers.

Winter

The park is still stunning in winter and walking on sunny days is very pleasant. It can be cold at night so bring warm gear if you're camping.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

13°C and 27°C

Highest recorded

42.9°C

Winter temperature

Average

8°C and 18°C

Lowest recorded

-0.1°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

February and March

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

230.2mm

Facilities

  • Tank water is available, however it’s not recommended for drinking.
  • The exclusive group camp area has non-flush toilets and wood barbecues. It is suitable for tents only.
  • There are no bins, so please take your rubbish with you when you leave.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Barbecue facilities

Wood barbecues are shared between 2 or 3 sites, and firewood is not supplied.

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)
  • Gas/electric barbecues (free)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Goannas roam around the campground. They are wild animals and should not be fed. Feeding them promotes scavenging behaviour and may make them aggressive and a nuisance to visitors. 

To help protect goannas, please:

  • Store food in sealed containers or in the car
  • Clean up any rubbish in the area and keep it out of their reach
  • Take all food scraps home

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Accessibility

Disability access level - easy

This area is fully wheelchair accessible

  • Toilet facilities are wheelchair accessible

Prohibited

Amplified music is not permitted.

Generators

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Gosford (29 km)

Gosford is a great destination for a family day trip or holiday. It's situated on Brisbane Water National Park and surrounded by state forests, lakes and beaches.

www.visitnsw.com

Hawkesbury area (41 km)

Explore the beautiful Hawkesbury River with Australia's Last River Boat Postman, or sample fresh oysters at a casual riverside cafe. Start your Hawkesbury adventure with a seaplane flight from Sydney to a local restaurant by the river.

www.sydney.com

Parramatta (41 km)

Parramatta offers a fascinating insight into early colonial life in Australia. Don't miss a visit to Old Government House, now one of 11 Australian Convict Sites on the UNESCO World Heritage list.

www.sydney.com

Learn more

Mill Creek campground is in Dharug National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Aboriginal heritage

Devines Hill, Dharug National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

Dharug National Park is the traditional Country of the Dharug Aboriginal people. Abundant in animal, plant and bird life, the area was a rich source of food, medicines and shelter. The park's diverse landscapes and all they contain feature in all aspects of Aboriginal culture and are associated with Dreaming stories and cultural learning that is still passed on today.

Rugged beauty

Devines Hill loop, Dharug National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

From the rugged bushland containing gang-gang cockatoos, satin bowerbirds and Lewin's honeyeaters to the sparkling waters of the creeks and the rich colours of the sandstone cliffs and formations, Dharug National Park offers a diverse range of landscapes. Bring your bike, bushwalk, camp by the creek, canoe on the Hawkesbury or make the most of the backdrop with your camera, there is so much to explore.

Step into Australia’s past

The Old Great North Road walk, Dharug National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Dharug National Park contains the Old Great North Road, one of 11 historic sites which form the Australian Convict Sites World Heritage property. It's a spectacular example of early colonial engineering and demonstrates the use of convict labour; up to 720 convicts - some in chains - worked on the road, which spanned 264km, connecting Sydney to the settlements of the Hunter Valley. Only 43km of the road remains relatively intact, running from Wisemans Ferry in the south to Mount Manning in the north and includes the oldest surviving stone bridges in mainland Australia. It makes a great walk to explore over two or three days or an exhilarating day's cycle.

  • Devines Hill loop Head to Devines Hill loop in Dharug National Park, near Wisemans Ferry this weekend for a bike ride or walk along the historic World Heritage-listed Devines Hill loop.
  • Old Great North Road - World Heritage walk Old Great North Road – World Heritage walk highlights a historic convict-built road with scenic river views, via Finchs Line, in Dharug National Park.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

    With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

  • Australian brush turkey, Dorrigo National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Australian brush turkey (Alectura lathami)

    The Australian brush turkey, also known as bush or scrub turkey, can be found in rainforests along eastern NSW. With a striking red head, blue-black plumage and booming call, these distinctive Australian birds are easy to spot while bird watching in several NSW national parks.

  • Common wombat. Photo: Ingo Oeland

    Common wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian common wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • Lace monitor, Daleys Point walking track, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    Lace monitor (Varanus varius)

    One of Australia’s largest lizards, the carnivorous tree-dwelling lace monitor, or tree goanna, can grow to 2m in length and is found in forests and coastal tablelands across eastern Australia. These Australian animals are typically dark blue in colour with whitish spots or blotches.

Plants

  • Gymea lily. Photo: Simone Cottrell

    Gymea lily (Doryanthes excelsa)

    The magnificent Gymea lily is one of the most unusual Australian native plants, found only along the coast and surrounding bushland of the Sydney Basin, from Newcastle to Wollongong. In spring this giant lily shoots out spectacular red flowers that can reach heights of 2-4m.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

Campground. Photo: John Yurasek