Abercrombie Caves campground

Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve

Overview

Abercrombie Caves campground is a great place to camp over the summer holidays. It's a picturesque camping area offering walks, swimming, picnicking, birdwatching and the luxury of a hot shower.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 60
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Caravan site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Amenities block, picnic tables, barbecue facilities, cafe/kiosk, drinking water, public phone, showers, toilets, electric power
What to bring Firewood
Price

$15 per person per night. $39 per family per night (2 adults and children up to age 16).

Bookings Bookings are not required at this campground. Campsites are available on a first-in first-served basis.
Please note

Looking to get back to nature, but still want the luxury of a hot shower after a day of adventure? Abercrombie Caves campground is for you.

The first thing you’ll notice when you arrive here is the tranquil creek running through the camping area, with its clear waters and shady surrounds. Find yourself a grassy spot anywhere alongside the creek and pitch a tent or park your caravan.

Join one of the tours at Abercrombie Caves and be amazed at the incredible formations. Check out the magnificent waterfall on Grove Creek Falls walking track, or try your luck trout fishing in the creek.

Then head back to your campsite, throw a steak on the barbecue and enjoy the relaxing sounds of the nearby waters. As the sun sets, listen closely to nature’s orchestra, and keep your torch handy to spy possums in the trees or a wombat waddling past.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/abercrombie-caves-campground/local-alerts

Operated by

Park info

  • in Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve in the Country NSW region
  • Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve and caves are open Thursday to Monday (closed Tuesday and Wednesday). The reserve and caves area open daily during NSW school holidays. Closed Christmas Day.

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Abercrombie Caves campground.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    On entering Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve:

    • Follow the road to the Visitor Centre to reach the campground

    Park entry points

    Road quality

    • Sealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Weather restrictions

    • All weather

    Parking

    Parking is available at Abercrombie Caves campground . Bus parking is available nearby.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    Try your luck fishing for rainbow trout in Grove Creek and breathe in the crisp autumn air.

    Spring

    Pack a picnic and head off on the Grove Creek Falls walking track to enjoy a relaxing lunch with spectacular views of the waterfalls.

    Summer

    Step out of your tent and enjoy a refreshing swim in the pools of Grove Creek, then discover the natural wonders underground on a tour at Abercrombie Caves.

    Winter

    Explore the historic mining site at Mount Gray by day, then get cosy by the campfire at night.

    Facilities

    Rubbish bins are not available – please take rubbish with you when leaving.

    Amenities

    Toilets

    • Flush toilets

    Picnic tables

    Barbecue facilities

    Electric barbecues are coin operated and require $1 coins.

    • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)
    • Gas/electric barbecues (coin-operated)
    • Fire rings (bring your own firewood)

    Cafe/kiosk

    The kiosk sells small snacks and drinks. It's a good idea to pack a picnic if you'd like to enjoy lunch on your visit to Abercrombie Caves.

    Drinking water

    Public phone

    Showers

    • Hot showers
    • Cold showers

    Electric power

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Bushwalking safety

    If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

    Camping safety

    Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

    Fire safety

    During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

    Fishing safety

    Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    River and lake safety

    The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

    Accessibility

    Disability access level - easy

    This area is fully wheelchair accessible.

    Permitted

    Camp fires and solid fuel burners

    Camping

    Generators

    Generators can be used in particular areas within this campground until 10pm. Abercrombie Caves campground have noise restrictions so visitors and wildlife can enjoy the park together.

    Horses

    Prohibited

    Gathering firewood

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Bathurst (55 km)

    Within a 70-km radius of Bathurst are the spectacular limestone cave systems -Abercrombie and Jenolan caves - which you can explore safely on guided tours.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Blayney (40 km)

    Blayney, a small farming town in the heart of Country NSW, is a great base for exploring regional heritage sites. Many of the buildings in Blayney and surrounding townships are classified by the National Trust.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Crookwell (55 km)

    Situated high on the Great Dividing Range more than 900 m above sea level, the area experiences four distinct seasons and is ideal for growing disease-free seed potatoes, making it a key supply area to Australia's potato-growing regions. Every March, the region celebrates the industry with the Crookwell Potato Festival.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Abercrombie Caves campground is in Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Bushrangers

    Abercrombie Karst Conservationa Reserve. Photo: Boris Hlavica

    In 1830 armed settlers, mounted police, and an army regiment fought it out with the Ribbon Gang near the caves. Ralph Entwistle, a convict servant, led a rebellion of convicts at Bathurst. His gang became known as 'The Ribbon Gang' because many of its members were said to have worn white ribbons in their hats.

    • Mount Gray walking track Mount Gray walking track, near Abercrombie Caves, is a bushwalk to the relics of a historic mining site. It continues on to the magnificent waterfalls and scenic views at Grove Creek Falls.

    Caves of time

    North Arch, Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: OEH

    Abercrombie Caves and the surrounding area is part of the traditional country of the Burra Burra group, who are part of the larger Wiradjuri tribe. The Burra Burra group knew about the caves, although no Aboriginal artifacts have been found in Arch Cave itself. However, in 1977 a research team found stone tools and animal bones, inlcuding some from extinct animals, in a shelter north of the Great Arch.

    Natural wonders

    Abercrombie Karst Conservationa Reserve. Photo: Boris Hlavica

    The natural wonders of Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve will inspire you. Rare plant species such as laurel-leaf grevilleas and Chalker's wattle brighten the area with vibrant shades of yellow and red. Lucky visitors may also catch a glimpse of wildlife such as vulnerable peregrine falcons and sugar gliders lurking through the trees. Wallabies are also known to call Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve home, so be sure to keep an eye out.

    Underground wonders

    Abercrombie Caves, Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: Boris Hlavica

    As early as 1821, the Sydney Gazette reported that 'a cave of considerable dimensions has been recently discovered in the neighbourhood of Bathurst'. There's no wonder that almost 200 years later the caves attract visitors from far and wide. The famous Arch Cave is 221 metres long, 60 metres wide at both ends and 30 metres high in the middle. It's considered the largest cave of its type in the southern hemisphere. Join a cave tour and discover the incredible natural world underground.

    • Archway Cave self-guided tour Take a self-guided tour of Archway Cave at Abercrombie Caves. It has the largest natural arch in the southern hemisphere. Its special features include the gold miners dance platform, built in 1880.
    • Belfry Cave tour This guided tour of Belfry Cave takes in the upper levels of the Archway at Abercrombie Caves. It's for adventurous spirits – you'll cross a suspension bridge and climb ladders just to get to there!
    • Bushrangers Cave tour Bushrangers Cave is named for the bushrangers who roamed the rugged Abercrombie Ranges in 1830, and used the cave as a shelter. Join this guided tour at Abercrombie Caves to find out more.
    • Grove Cave tour Feeling adventurous? If you are, join a challenging guided tour of Grove Cave at Abercrombie Caves. It's made up of tight narrow passages, high ceilings and white walls.
    • Grove Creek Falls walking track Grove Creek Falls is a must-see for visitors to the Abercrombie Caves area. This walking track offers magnificent waterfalls, bushwalking, fishing and picnicking.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Eastern bentwing bat. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Eastern bentwing-bat (Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis)

      In colonies numbering up to 150,000, eastern bentwing-bats congregate in caves across the east and north-west coasts of Australia. These small Australian animals weigh around 13-17g and can reach speeds of up to 50km per hour. Eastern bentwing-bats use both sight and echolocation to catch small insects mid-air.

    • Swamp wallaby in Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

      The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

    • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

      Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

      Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

    •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

      With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    Amenities block and grassy campsites at Abercrombie Caves campground. Photo: Stephen Babka/DPIE