Sea Acres National Park

Overview

Sea Acres National Park at Port Macquarie is an easy walk for all. Explore it alone or take a guided tour to find out more about the Aboriginal history of the area.

Read more about Sea Acres National Park

Sea Acres National Park is a beach wrapped in rainforest, where the crash of waves is accompanied by a choir of birdsong. It protects one of the largest remaining coastal rainforests on the Australian east coast, meaning that the rainforest runs all the way to the beach.

The rainforest is best explored along the boardwalk. This elevated walkway is an easy stroll that you can enjoy at your own pace or on a guided tour with a rainforest guide. There are also a range of Aboriginal Discovery activities where you can find out more about the Aboriginal history of the area and try some bush tucker.

If you’d like to spend longer in this tranquil rainforest environment, you can enjoy a hot cuppa or cold drink at the Rainforest Café.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/sea-acres-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

  • in the North Coast region
  • Sea Acres National Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

  • More
See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Sea Acres National Park.

Getting there and parking

Sea Acres National Park is on Pacific Drive, 5km south of Port Macquarie and adjacent to Shelly Beach

Road quality

  • Sealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

By bike

Check out the Bicycle Info website for more information

Best times to visit

Summer

Head to the cool rainforest to escape the summer heat.

Winter

Take binoculars and a camera on beach walks to look to sea for migrating whales.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

18°C and 25°C

Highest recorded

42.3°C

Winter temperature

Average

11°C and 20°C

Lowest recorded

0°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

February

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

1,550mm

Facilities

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Visitor centre

Nearby towns

Port Macquarie (5 km)

Vibrant Port Macquarie is surrounded by beautiful waterways - the Hastings River, canals, creeks, bays and the Pacific Ocean. The city also has a five-star collection of golden-sand beaches stretching from Port Macquarie Beach to Town Beach and north along the 16-km swathe of North Beach.

www.visitnsw.com

Wauchope (22 km)

Wauchope is great base for exploring nearby national parks that are part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area. Follow the Hastings Forest Way to Werrikimbe National Park, a rugged wilderness of outstanding beauty spread with short and long walks. Willi Willi National Park is a rainforest mountain park with three beautiful walking tracks that follow the river and lead to a sparkling waterfall. 

www.visitnsw.com

Kempsey (54 km)

Kempsey is a historic river town close to national parks and majestic beaches. Kempsey is a convenient place for an overnight stop for anyone driving between Sydney and the North Coast.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Sea Acres National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Find out more about this special place

Rainforest boardwalk, Sea Acres National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

If you are looking for an educational experience within Sea Acres National Park then take some time out to have a look at The Spirit of the Land exhibition. This multimedia exhibition takes you on a virtual tour of Birpai Country and introduces you to key Birpai stories.

  • Port Macquarie coastal walk You'll pass historic sites, stunning coastal scenery, beaches, and rainforest along the Port Macquarie coastal walk. It can be enjoyed as a full day walk or broken up into several short walks.
  • Sea Acres Rainforest Centre Close to Port Macquarie, Sea Acres Rainforest Centre is the gateway to your rainforest experience. Friendly staff provide information and there is a café where you can enjoy a delicious breakfast and lunch.

Ancient connections

Rocky coastline with a distant lighthouse, Sea Acres  National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

Sea Acres National Park is the traditional country of the Birpai People. The park's landscape has provided a rich source of food, medicines and shelter for thousands of years. Evidence of Aboriginal inhabitants has been found in Sea Acres National Park, and it's likely that the Birpai used the area for fishing, hunting and gathering.

Worlds away

Rocky coastine in Sea Acres National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

When you venture out on the boardwalk, immersed in the still beauty of the rainforest, you’ll really believe you've travelled back in time. And you're right. The environment here has remained unchanged for thousands of years. Engage your senses and let the rainforest and its residents take you away to another place. The rainforest is a haven for myriad birds, so look out for the colourful wompoo fruit dove and rose crowned fruit dove and listen for the distinctive yowl of the green catbird. You're bound to see a brush turkey or two foraging on the forest floor.

  • Sea Acres Rainforest boardwalk The Sea Acres Rainforest boardwalk is best experienced on a guided tour. An easy 1.3km walk through the rainforest canopy, you’ll see forest birds and animals.

Midnight feast

Brush tail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), Sea Acres National Park. Photo: Ken Stepnell/OEH

In the evening, when all the visitors have left, the rainforest of Sea Acres comes alive as bats, possums and bush rats start their day. Rats forage for food in the forest undergrowth, possums hang from trees to munch on berries and leaves, and flying foxes swoop from one tree to another. The park is also the occasional home to koalas which feed on the eucalypts along the western boundary. The park is an important habitat for koalas in the Port Macquarie area as it is one of the largest naturally-vegetated areas remaining and contains some of their favourite food.

  • Yoga in the rainforest Experience the nature of stillness on a guided meditative walk with Simon Adel (from Port Yoga) in the rainforest of Sea Acres National Park. It's a great way to start your weekend.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell

    Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    One of the most renowned Australian animals, the tree-dwelling marsupial koala can be found in gum tree forests and woodlands across eastern NSW, Victoria and Queensland, as well as in isolated regions in South Australia. With a vice-like grip, this perhaps most iconic but endangered Australian animal lives in tall eucalypts within a home range of several hectares.

  • White-bellied sea eagle. Photo: John Turbill

    White-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster)

    White-bellied sea eagles can be easily identified by their white tail and dark grey wings. These raptors are often spotted cruising the coastal breezes throughout Australia, and make for some scenic bird watching. Powerful Australian birds of prey, they are known to mate for life, and return each year to the same nest to breed.

  • Australian brush turkey, Dorrigo National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Australian brush turkey (Alectura lathami)

    The Australian brush turkey, also known as bush or scrub turkey, can be found in rainforests along eastern NSW. With a striking red head, blue-black plumage and booming call, these distinctive Australian birds are easy to spot while bird watching in several NSW national parks.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

What we're doing

Sea Acres National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

Understanding landscapes and geology

NPWS is dedicated to preserving the geology, special landscapes and natural assets of Sea Acres National Park, and programs to protect and preserve its geology, waterways and unique ecosystems are in place. NPWS encourages research into the park’s geology and geomorphic processes, and works to protect relevant sites wherever possible. Visitor interpretation and education is an ongoing priority in this park.

Preserving biodiversity

Sea Acres National Park embraces efforts to support the biodiversity of its flora and fauna. Conservation programs operate within this park and may include research studies, pest management strategies, weed control, monitoring of visitor impacts and fire management planning. NPWS liaises with Hastings Council and other relevant authorities on issues affecting the biodiversity of the park.

Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Sea Acres National Park. NPWS carries out risk assesments for new and emerging weeds as well as Bitou bush and boneseed management to protect biodiversity in this park.

Conservation program

Bitou bush threat abatement plan

Bitou bush poses a serious and widespread threat to threatened species populations and ecological communities on the NSW coast. The NPWS bitou bush threat abatement plan helps to reduce the impact of weeds at priority sites using control measures such as ground spraying, aerial spraying, biological control and physical removal.

Developing visitor facilities and experiences

NPWS works to increase opportunities for people to visit and enjoy our national parks and reserves, including Sea Acres National Park. To reflect this, the park hosts regular events to appeal to the local community and engage their interest in national parks.

Conservation program

Tour guide and visitor services volunteer program

When you sign up to volunteer for tour guiding and visitor services, you’ll be doing something for yourself as well as for the benefit of visitors to NSW national parks.

Conserving our Aboriginal culture

Sea Acres National Park is dedicated to preserving its rich Aboriginal heritage. The condition of the park’s cultural sites is regularly assessed and carefully managed, and NPWS works closely with the Birpai Aboriginal Land Council to ensure this. The park works to educate visitors through interpretive exhibitions and displays, which are maintained and upgraded as required.

Managing fire

NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

Conservation program

Planning for fire

Bushfires are inevitable across fire-prone vegetation types within NSW national parks. NPWS prepares for wildfires by working with other fire agencies, reserve neighbours and the community to ensure protection of life, property and biodiversity. Every park has its own fire management strategy, devised in consultation with partner fire authorities and the community to plan and prioritise fire management.

Sea Acres National Park. Photo Rob Cleary