Monga National Park

Overview

Monga National Park has something for all, with 4WD touring routes, walking and horse riding tracks to enjoy, peaceful places to picnic, and ancient forests to discover.

Read more about Monga National Park

Whether you’re looking for a peaceful place to picnic, a stroll through the forest, a challenging full day hike, or a scenic drive on a 4WD touring route, there’s something for everyone at Monga National Park.

You’ll find cool temperate rainforest filled with ancient plumwood trees from the Gondwana Age, warm temperate rainforests and old growth eucalypt forests. Enjoy relaxing picnics along the banks of Mongarlowe River, with peaceful spots to watch the local wildlife and admire the unique Monga waratahs in flower.

Take a short stroll through the forest along the wheelchair-friendly boardwalk at Penance Grove, or spend the day horse riding and walking in the footsteps of European settlers and Aboriginal tribes on the historic Corn Trail walking track.

Whatever you choose to do, you’ll leave Monga feeling refreshed and rejuvenated by this beautiful pocket of soothing wilderness.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/monga-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Monga National Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Braidwood:

    • Travel east along Kings Highway towards Batemans Bay
    • After approximately 20km, turn right into River Forest Road.
    • After approximately 2km, you’ll enter the park.

    From Batemans Bay :

    • Travel west along Kings Highway towards Braidwood
    • After approximately 40km, turn left into River Forest Road.
    • After approximately 2km, you’ll enter the park.

    Park entry points

    Parking

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    By public transport

    Monga is not accessible by public transport. The closest bus stop is in Braidwood. For information about public transport options, visit the NSW country transport info website.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Monga National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    Take in the sweet perfumes of the plumwood trees in flower.

    Spring

    See the distinctive bright red colour of the Monga waratah in flower along the banks of Mongarlowe River.

    Summer

    Enjoy the cool temperatures in the rainforest and discover its natural wonders on Penance Grove walking track.

    Winter

    Embark on the historic Corn Trail walking track and experience the diverse natural landscapes of Monga.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    10°C and 26°C

    Highest recorded

    41.1°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    0°C and 11°C

    Lowest recorded

    -9.2°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    July

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    663.9mm

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Braidwood (22 km)

    Braidwood was the first town to be listed on the NSW State Heritage register. Today, you can tour the town on a self-guided heritage walk and see dozens of impressive historic buildings dating from the gold-rush days.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Batemans Bay (31 km)

    Batemans Bay is a bustling coastal town with majestic seascapes. It's located on the estuary of the Clyde River.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Moruya (57 km)

    Moruya is a historic dairy town on the Moruya River surrounded by dairy pastures and rugged national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Monga National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Unique plantlife

    Penance Grove walk, Monga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

    Many of the plants you'll find in the cool, temperate rainforests of Monga are millions of years in the making. Related to the plants from the super continent Gondwana, they present a unique window to the past. The plumwood trees and soft tree ferns you see around Penance Grove are closely related to pollen fossils found in Antarctica. Some plumwood trees here have widths of up to four metres and are thought to be thousands of years old. Wander along the banks of Mongarlowe River and you'll also see the distinctive bright red flowers of the Monga waratah.

    • Dasyurus picnic area Dasyurus picnic area is a tranquil spot to stop on your drive to the coast from Canberra or a great day trip from Batemans Bay or Braidwood.
    • Mongarlowe River picnic area Under the shade of eucalypt forest, this sheltered picnic site is an ideal place to start exploring Monga's rich habitats with easy strolls, swimming, and birdwatching.

    Aboriginal culture

    Mongarlowe River, Dasyurus picnic area, Monga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

    For over 14,000 years, the Yuin and Walbunja people have lived around the valleys of Clyde, Deua and Buckenbowra rivers. Walkers and horse riders can walk in their footsteps on Corn Trail walking track, which was one of the trails used by Aboriginal people to travel between the coast and the tablelands. There are many Aboriginal cultural sites in the park where stone artefacts, fire beacons and old campsites have been found.

    A glimpse of trading history

    Mongarlowe River picnic area, Monga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

    Monga National Park is significant for its natural wonders and its historic heritage. Corn Trail walking track, which is today enjoyed by bushwalkers and horse riders, was the first trade route between the Buckenbowra Valley farmlands near the coast and the early European settlements on the tablelands near Braidwood. Further settlement came to the area in the 1840s, with the establishment of the timber trade and gold mining. The sawmill at Monga provided timber for Braidwood and the establishment of Canberra in the 1900s, with logging continuing in the area until 1987.

    • Corn Trail walking track Corn Trail walking track is a historic trail for hikers and horse riders to traverse a wide variety of landscapes and follow in the footsteps of the past.

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Monga National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents.

    Monga National Park hero. Photo: Lucas Boyd