Coffs Coast Regional Park

Overview

Coffs Coast Regional Park, near Coffs Harbour, is a top spot for fishing, surfing and birdwatching. You’ll find great picnic areas, plus beaches with off-leash dog zones.

Read more about Coffs Coast Regional Park

It’s easy to experience an endless summer at Coffs Coast Regional Park. Lose yourself in its string of pristine beaches which together offer everything from unbeatable surf and safe swimming to picnic areas and children’s playgrounds.

Explore undulating dunes, rainforest pockets, tranquil lakes, inviting parklands and charming coastal towns along the coastal walk and discover majestic headlands ideal for whale watching and taking in sweeping views of Solitary Islands Marine Park.

Take your pick of outdoor activities – either in the water or along the waterfront. Go fishing, birdwatching or bodyboarding, take your dog for a walk, or find the perfect picnic spot for a memorable family barbecue.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/coffs-coast-regional-park/local-alerts

Contact

  • in the North Coast region
  • Coffs Coast Regional Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

    • Coffs Harbour
      (02) 6652 0900
      Contact hours: 8.30am-4.30pm Monday to Friday
    • 32 Marina Drive, Coffs Harbour NSW
    • Fax: (02) 6651 9525
    More
See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Coffs Coast Regional Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Coffs Coast Regional Park is accessible in several places from the Pacific Highway. Diggers, Beach Arrawarra, and Woolgoolga are the largest sections of the park.

    Park entry points Show more

    Parking Show more

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information

    Best times to visit

    Spring

    Head to one of the Park's headlands for stunning coastal views and to watch whales.

    Summer

    The beaches of the park are your playground - go swimming surfing, snorkling and more.

    Winter

    A great time to walk the Solitary Islands coastal walk.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    17°C and 29°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    5°C and 20°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    August

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    388.2mm

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Permitted

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals are permitted in some areas of this park.

    The following areas allow dog walking:

    • Hearns Lake Beach (Woolgoolga)
    • Darkum Beach (Woolgoolga North)
    • Corindi/Pipe Clay Beach (Arrawarra North)
    • Emerald Beach, north of Fiddamans Creek and south of Diggers Head.
    • Woolgoolga Back Beach
    • Woolgoolga Lake

    Certified assistance animals are allowed in all areas of this park. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the OEH pets in parks policy for more information.

    Prohibited

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Woolgoolga (1 km)

    Woolgoolga is a busy rural service town with a large Sikh population. It features a coastal setting surrounded by banana farms and forested hills.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Coffs Harbour (19 km)

    Coffs Harbour is a coastal city on the North Coast, packed with things to do. It's surrounded by lush forests and national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Bellingen (54 km)

    Bellingen is a laid-back, tree-lined town with a New Age vibe. It's set in a luxuriant valley beside the Bellinger River.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Coffs Coast Regional Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Whale watchers

    Sitting under a tree by Woolgoola Beach. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Coffs Coast Regional Park is a fantastic place to enjoy watching these majestic creatures on their long coastal journey. Look-At-Me-Now Headland near Emerald Beach is a great vantage point, but locals agree Woolgoolga Headland is your best bet for glimpsing humpbacks. In fact, it’s also known as ‘Whale Watch Headland’. Plan a trip between June and October to see this inspiring sight.

    • Woolgoolga Beach and Headland Woolgoolga Beach and Headland has the best whale watching in the Coffs Region, plus great surfing, fishing and picnics and scenic views.

    Life’s a beach

    Surfer at Ocean View Beach, Coffs Coast Regional Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Golden beaches are the park’s premier attraction. Here, everything revolves around the water – whether you’re swimming and surfing in it, or walking and fishing beside it. Spend your days discovering the headland walking tracks, boat ramps, parklands and playgrounds. And no matter where you go, you’re bound to find a perfect spot for a beachside picnic. There are also plenty of dog-friendly areas at Coffs Coast Regional Park – just another of its popular features. Take your dog for a walk along one of the coastal paths, plus, there are several beaches with leash-free zones, meaning your pooch can zip about and enjoy the sand and sea as much as you do. The leash-free area around Corindi and Pipeclay beaches is a local favourite.

    • Arrawarra Headland Soak up views of Solitary Islands Marine Park from Arrawarra Headland and Beach near Coffs Harbour. Fishing, surfing, swimming – it’s all here waiting for you to enjoy.
    • Diggers Beach Located opposite the Big Banana in Coffs Harbour, Diggers Beach is excellent for surfing and learning to surf, plus fishing, swimming, birdwatching and beach walking.
    • Emerald Beach Positioned near Look-at-me-now Headland, 20km from Coffs Harbour, Emerald Beach is a local surfing hotspot. Visit also for fishing or swimming, or for barbecues in the picnic area.
    • Mullaway Beach and Headland Head south from Arrawarra to discover beautiful Mullaway Headland and Beach, near Coffs Harbour. Make the most of its picnic area and barbecues, go fishing or swimming.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • White-bellied sea eagle. Photo: John Turbill

      White-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster)

      White-bellied sea eagles can be easily identified by their white tail and dark grey wings. These raptors are often spotted cruising the coastal breezes throughout Australia, and make for some scenic bird watching. Powerful Australian birds of prey, they are known to mate for life, and return each year to the same nest to breed.

    • Brown striped frog. Photo: OEH

      Brown-striped frog (Lymnastes peronii)

      One of the most common frogs found in Australia, the ground-dwelling brown-striped frog lives in ponds, dams and swamps along the east coast. Also known as the striped marsh frog, this amphibian grows to 6.5cm across and has a distinctive ‘tok’ call that can be heard all year round.

    • Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Photo: Peter Sherratt

      Yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

      The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is one of the largest species of parrot. With dusty-black plumage, they have a yellow tail and cheek patch. They’re easily spotted while bird watching, as they feed on seeds in native forests and pine plantations.

    • Echidna. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

      One of only 2 egg-laying mammals in the world, the short-beaked echidna is one of the most widespread of Australian native animals. Covered in spines, or quills, they’re equipped with a keen sense of smell and a tube-like snout which they use to break apart termite mounds in search of ants.

    •  Blue-tongue lizard, Ben Boyd National Park. Photo: John Spencer

      Eastern blue-tongue lizard (Tiliqua scinciodes)

      The eastern blue-tongue lizard, one of the largest skinks in Australia, is found throughout most of NSW. When threatened, the eastern blue-tongue lizard displays its blue tongue in a wide-mouthed intimidating show. Not an agile animal, they feed on slow-moving beetles and snails.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Coffs Coast Regional Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

    Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

    Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Coffs Coast Regional Park. Risk assessments for new and emerging weeds are carried out as an ongoing initiative within the park. Pest management of foxes and coastal weeds is a priority and an important part of the work NPWS does to protect the integrity of biodiversity which exists within Coffs Coast.

    Conservation program

    Fox threat abatement plan

    The fox threat abatement plan addresses the long-standing threat of foxes to biodiversity. By implementing fox control measures in 59 sites throughout NSW, the plan protects threatened species and works to minimise the potential of foxes to cause future extinctions.

    Historic heritage in our parks and reserves

    The Coffs Coast has been a much-loved, beach-side holiday destination since the early 1900s. Sea and beach cultural values are recognised and valued in the park and maintained for locals and visitors.

    Developing visitor facilities and experiences

    Ongoing assessment and upgrades of visitor facilities within Coffs Coast Regional Park are a priority for maintenance of this park. NPWS aims to liaise with all new park neighbours for any new additions within Coffs Coast, and prioritise the signage installations to enrich the visitor experience wherever possible.

    Conserving our Aboriginal culture

    Protection and interpretation of Aboriginal culture and heritage is of high significance in Coffs Coast Regional Park. Working with Gumbaynggirr Aboriginal Community is a high priority, in particular with the Garlambirla Guuyu Girrwa (Coffs Harbour Elders) and Garby Elders, so that traditional knowledge is incorporated into the management of this park.

    Managing fire

    NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

    Conservation program

    Hazard reduction program

    Managing fire-prone NSW national parks requires a three-pronged approach, including fire planning, community education, and fuel management. When it comes to fuel like dead wood, NPWS conducts planned hazard reduction activities like mowing and controlled burning to assist in the protection of life, property and community.

    Diggers Beach, Coffs Coast Regional Park. Photo: Rob Cleary