Tumut Visitor Centre

Tumut area in Kosciuszko National Park

Overview

Tumut Visitor Centre, on Snowy Mountains Highway, is the ideal starting point for a visit to northern Kosciuszko National Park, offering information, booking services, and souvenirs.

Type
Visitor centres
Where
Tumut area in Kosciuszko National Park
Accessibility
Easy
Price
Free
Entry fees

No park entry fees apply at the visitor centre.

Opening times

9am–5pm daily. Closed on Christmas Day.

Please note
  • The visitor centre is located outside the park. Park entry fees apply within areas of Kosciuszko National Park.
  • If you're planning a long hike or visiting a remote part of Kosciuszko National Park, drop into the visitor centre to complete a trip intention form and hire a PLB.

Northern Kosciusko National Park and Tumut Region covers a vast area: where to begin? Your best bet is Tumut Visitor Centre, located a short drive from the park in Tumut's historic Old Butter Factory.

As well as a 24-hour tourism touch screen, and a retail shop stocking visitor guides, topographical and 4WD maps, you'll find friendly, knowledgeable staff who can offer great tips and help you plan your Kosciuszko adventure. Book accommodation, or get advice on road conditions, fire warnings and other important information about Kosciuszko National Park.

While you're here, don't miss the visitor centre's corroboree frogs on display or the local exhibition space. For something a little different, ask the visitor centre about guided tours in the national park. 

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/visitor-centres/tumut-visitor-centre/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Tumut Visitor Centre.

Getting there and parking

Tumut Visitor Centre is just outside the northern entry point to Kosciuszko National Park, on the corner of Snowy Mountains Highway and Gocup Road, in Tumut.

Road quality

  • It's recommended that all vehicles carry snow chains from the June to October long weekends. Read our snow driving in Kosciuszko tips.
  • Roads can close in extreme weather, so it’s a good idea to check weather and road conditions before setting out.

  • Sealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available at Tumut Visitor Centre, including several designated disabled spots.

Facilities

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Alpine safety

Alpine areas present special safety issues. Conditions can be extreme and may change rapidly, particularly in winter. It’s important to be prepared and find out how to stay safe in alpine areas.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Accessibility

Disability access level - easy

Tumut Visitor Centre is fully wheelchair-accessible.

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the OEH pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Visitor centre

Nearby towns

Adelong (11 km)

The Coat of Arms Kaffeehaus Restaurant at the beautiful Beaufort House in Adelong is a must-do dining experience. The restaurant offers pizzas, salads and classic Viennese dishes. Beaufort House also offers accommodation for visitors looking for a comfortable retreat.

www.visitnsw.com

Gundagai (13 km)

Sifting through a treasure trove of memorabilia at Gundagai Historic Museum,, you'll find the two gorgets (medallions) presented to Yarri and Jacky, Wiradjuri men whose efforts saved many lives during Gundagai's great flood in 1852.

www.visitnsw.com

Tumut (7 km)

Tumut is a country town on the northern foothills of the Snowy Mountains. The Rolling valleys, mountain streams and alpine mountain ranges make it popular for nature lovers and adventure enthusiasts.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Tumut Visitor Centre is in Tumut area. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Explore by water, wheels or walking

Tumut Visitor Centre, northern gateway to Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: E Sheargold

If you need some inspiration, stop by the Tumut Visitor Centre, for tips on top experiences, where to stay, and spot a corroboree frog in the display. Learn more about Kosciuszko National Park’s plants, animals and landscapes on an Aboriginal ranger-led tour (contact the visitor centre). Boat ramps on Blowering Reservoir, Talbingo Dam wall, and at O’Hares campground provide easy access for boating and paddling. There are also plenty of scenic drives, walking tracks and bike trails to tempt you away from the water. If you’re well-prepared, explore the remote Goobarragandra Wilderness or hike part of the 425km Hume and Hovell walking track.

  • Tumut Visitor Centre Tumut Visitor Centre, on Snowy Mountains Highway, is the ideal starting point for a visit to northern Kosciuszko National Park, offering information, booking services, and souvenirs.

World-class wilderness

Black Perry lookout, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Three Sides

In recognition of Kosciuszko's unique value as a conservation area, it’s been named a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. More than half of the park, over 350,000ha, has been declared wilderness, including the Bogong Peaks and Goobarragandra wilderness areas. Black Perry lookout is an excellent place to get a sense of the expansive wilderness areas in Kosciuszko's north.

Snowy Mountains history

Tumut 3 Power Station, Talbingo, near Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: E Sheargold

Head south on Lobs Hole Ravine trail, you’ll soon find the short Jounama heritage walk to the ruins of several old graziers homes from the early 1900s. Further along you can explore relics from the area’s copper mining past, which saw Ravine grow into a village complete with school, butcher, police station and blacksmiths.

Tumut area’s more recent history can be seen at Blowering Reservoir, and just outside the park at Talbingo. The Snowy Hydro Scheme is recognised as one of the civil engineering wonders of the modern world. Its vast network of dams and power stations includes Blowering, Jounama and Talbingo reservoirs, and Tumut 3 Power Station, at Talbingo.

Unique landscapes

Lobs Hole Ravine 4WD trail, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer

The change in scenery is noticeable as you drive along Snowy Mountains Highway. The road climbs over 1000m from the Tumut River Valley, through woodland of mountain gum and narrow-leaf peppermint, to the treeless plains surrounding Kiandra. Detour off the highway to Lobs Hole Ravine trail (4WD recommended), to see evidence of Australia’s last Ice Age. Basalt block streams and boulder fields, formed by ice between the rocks repeatedly freezing and thawing, can be seen near Wallaces Creek lookout, in the Selwyn area.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Swamp wallaby, Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

    The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

  • Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Photo: Peter Sherratt

    Yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

    The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is one of the largest species of parrot. With dusty-black plumage, they have a yellow tail and cheek patch. They’re easily spotted while bird watching, as they feed on seeds in native forests and pine plantations.

  • Brush tail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    One of the most widespread of Australian tree-dwelling marsupials, the common brushtail possum is found across most of NSW in woodlands, rainforests and urban areas. With strong claws, a prehensile tail and opposable digits, these native Australian animals are well-adapted for life amongst the trees.

  • Eastern common ringtail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus)

    Commonly found in forests, woodlands and leafy gardens across eastern NSW, the Australian ringtail possum is a tree-dwelling marsupial. With a powerful tail perfectly adapted to grasp objects, it forages in trees for eucalypt leaves, flowers and fruit.

  • Common wombat. Photo: Ingo Oeland

    Common wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian common wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • Emu, Yanga National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

    The largest of Australian birds, the emu stands up to 2m high and is the second largest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Emus live in pairs or family groups. The male emu incubates and rears the young, which will stay with the adult emus for up to 2 years.

  • Platypus swimming around in the water. Photo: Sharon Wormleaton

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

    One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Echidna. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

    One of only 2 egg-laying mammals in the world, the short-beaked echidna is one of the most widespread of Australian native animals. Covered in spines, or quills, they’re equipped with a keen sense of smell and a tube-like snout which they use to break apart termite mounds in search of ants.

  •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

    With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

Environments in this park

School excursions (4)

Blowering Cliffs walking track, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer