Bongil Beach

Bongil Bongil National Park

Overview

Bongil Beach, in Bongil Bongil National Park near Coffs Harbour, is a remote beach ideal for walking and fishing offering scenic coastal views and birdwatching.

Where
Bongil Bongil National Park
Price
Free
What to
bring
Drinking water, sunscreen, hat
Please note
  • Drinking water is limited in this area, so it’s a good idea to bring your own.
  • Beach driving is possible with a permit as far as the southern side of Bundagen Head on North Beach. From that point, it’s walking only.
  • The weather in the area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
  • There's limited mobile reception in this park

If you love walking along wild and untamed beaches, then Bongil Beach in Bongil Bongil National Park is the place to be. Nestled between Bongil picnic area in the north and Bundagen Headland to the south, it's ideal for nature-lovers who want a remote nature experience and enjoy some birdwatching.

South of Coffs Harbour near Sawtell, you’ll have to walk in to Bongil Beach. You might see seasoned surfers, and it's a popular spot with the locals for beach fishing. But with 7km of golden sand and unspoilt coastline to go around, you won't feel crowded in.

Keep your eye on the waves, as you might see dolphins and, on shore along the dunes, the bright pink flowers of the succulent pigface are sure to catch your attention. Look out for shorebirds such as little terns, red-capped plover and pied oystercatchers scurrying across the sand.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/surfing-spots/bongil-beach/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Bongil Beach.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Bongil Beach is in the northern section of Bongil Bongil National Park. There are four options for getting there:

    • Cross the waist-deep water of Bonville Creek estuary from Sawtell
    • From Palm crossing trail, which is in the central section of Bongil Bongil National Park, walk 1km from the locked gate to reach the beach.
    • From Overhead Bridge Road, in the central section of Bongil Bongil National Park, walk 1.5km from the locked gate to the beach.
    • From Bundagen Head, in the southern section of the park, via Mylestom. Beach vehicle access to Bundagen Head is possible with a permit. From there, walk north to the beach.

    Park entry points

    Road quality

    • Unsealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Weather restrictions

    • All weather

    Parking

    Parking is available at numerous locations within southern Sawtell.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Bongil Bongil National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    With cooler weather, it's a great time to explore the mountain bike tracks in the park.

    Summer

    A great time to explore Bonville Creek by canoe, kayak or stand-up paddle board.

    Winter

    Look for birds feeding on fruit-bearing trees in the rainforest.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    20°C and 27°C

    Highest recorded

    43.3°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    9°C and 21°C

    Lowest recorded

    -3.2°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    September

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    404.6mm

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Beach safety

    Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

    Bongil Beach is generally not safe for swimming. Rips and deep currents are present and entering the water is only recommended for experienced surfers.

    Fishing safety

    Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Permitted

    Fishing

    A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Bellingen (18 km)

    Bellingen is a laid-back, tree-lined town with a New Age vibe. It's set in a luxuriant valley beside the Bellinger River.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Coffs Harbour (12 km)

    Coffs Harbour is a coastal city on the North Coast, packed with things to do. It's surrounded by lush forests and national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Bongil Beach is in Bongil Bongil National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    A place where one stays a long time

    Bundagaree Rainforest walk, Bongil Bongil National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

    Bongil Bongil National Park is the traditional land of the Gumbaynggir people, whose ancestral lands extend from Grafton in the north to the Nambucca river in the south, and from the coast west to the headwaters of the Nymboida river. The park provided abundant seafood and bushtucker, and was a site for gatherings and sacred ceremonies.

    • Bush tucker Bush tucker is a Stage 3 (Years 5-6) school excursion in Bongil Bongil National Park which focuses on HSIE. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy walk along the forested banks of Bonville Creek, to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in this park.
    • Bush tucker Bush tucker is a school excursion in Bongil Bongil National Park for Stage 5 (Years 9-10) students focusing on geography as a KLA. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy stroll along the forested banks of Bonville Creek to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in the park.
    • Bush tucker Bush tucker is a Stage 4 (Years 7-8) school excursion to Bongil Bongil National Park, which focuses on geography as a KLA. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy stroll along the forested banks of Bonville Creek, to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in the park.
    • Bush tucker Bush tucker in Bongil Bongil National Park is a school excursion for Stage 2 (Years 3-4) students with a focus on HSIE. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy stroll along the forested banks of Bonville Creek, to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in the park.

    Beaches and waterways

    Bonville Beach, Bongil Bongil National Parks. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

    The waterways within Bongil Bongil National Park carry water across the coastal plains from the steep foothills to the west, providing a home for many types of birds, animals and reptiles. For visitors, the waterways and beaches in Bongil Bongil National Park offer a range of water activities, including excellent fishing and kayaking. Try your luck on the Bonville river for flathead and whiting.

    Birdwatcher's haven

    Bundagaree Rainforest walk, Bongil Bongil National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

    In addition to being home to one of NSW's largest koala populations, Bongil Bongil National Park also boasts more than 165 species of birds. The park provides breeding, roosting and feeding habitats for a number of migratory birds like the little tern and the pied oystercatcher. The Bundagaree Rainforest walk is the best place to see the birds of the rainforest, like the dramatically beautiful wompoo fruit dove and the colourful rose-crowned fruit dove that makes a loud and explosive "hookco" sound.

    • Bongil Beach Bongil Beach, in Bongil Bongil National Park near Coffs Harbour, is a remote beach ideal for walking and fishing offering scenic coastal views and birdwatching.
    • Bundagaree Rainforest walk Bundagaree Rainforest walk is near Tuckers Rocks in Bongil Bongil National Park on the NSW north coast. This easy walk takes in rainforest and beach.
    • Pine Creek paddle route Adventurous canoeists, kayakers, and stand up paddleboarders will enjoy this downstream route along pristine Pine Creek, a wildlife haven in Bongil Bongil National Park, near Coffs Harbour.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell

      Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

      One of the most renowned Australian animals, the tree-dwelling marsupial koala can be found in gum tree forests and woodlands across eastern NSW, Victoria and Queensland, as well as in isolated regions in South Australia. With a vice-like grip, this perhaps most iconic but endangered Australian animal lives in tall eucalypts within a home range of several hectares.

    • Grey headed flying fox hanging from a tree branch. Photo: Shane Ruming/OEH

      Grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)

      The grey-headed flying fox is one of several threatened Australian animals and the largest Australian native bat, with a wingspan that extends up to 1m. Known to inhabit woodlands, rainforests and urban regions, these fascinating nocturnal mammals congregate in large roost sites along the east coast of NSW.

    • Lace monitor, Daleys Point walking track, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

      Lace monitor (Varanus varius)

      One of Australia’s largest lizards, the carnivorous tree-dwelling lace monitor, or tree goanna, can grow to 2m in length and is found in forests and coastal tablelands across eastern Australia. These Australian animals are typically dark blue in colour with whitish spots or blotches.

    Plants

    •  Grey mangrove, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

      Grey mangrove (Avicennia marina)

      Grey mangrove is the most common and widespread mangrove found within intertidal zones across Australia, and throughout the world. Growing to a height of 3-10m, they thrive best in estuaries with a mix of fresh and salt water. They excrete excess salt through their long thick leaves, and absorb oxygen through their aerial root system.

    • Blueberry ash. Photo: Jaime Plaza

      Blueberry ash (Elaeocarpus reticulatus)

      The blueberry ash is a rainforest shrub which produces blue olive-shaped berries and spectacular bell-shaped flowers, which often appear on the plant together. It is a tall slender shrub or small tree found in rainforest, tall eucalypt forest and coastal bushland in eastern NSW, south-east Queensland and Victoria.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    School excursions (4)

    Bongil Beach, Bongil Bongil National Park. Photo: Barbara Webster