Woolgoolga Lake

Coffs Coast Regional Park

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Overview

Woolgoolga Lake is a great place for canoeing, kayaking, swimming and birdwatching. Make a day of it - pack a picnic or barbecue to enjoy at this scenic spot.

Where
Coffs Coast Regional Park
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note

Switch to a slower pace of life at Woolgoolga Lake on the north coast. You’ll find a family-friendly picnic area, shielded from the sun by shady eucalypts and paperbarks. It’s the perfect place to enjoy a lazy afternoon, serenaded by waterbirds, children laughing, barbecues sizzling and waves crashing nearby.

The lake is a calm tidal inlet so it’s great for a spot of paddling in a canoe or kayak, swimming and fishing or just floating along on a lilo.

There’s a wealth of resident birdlife to watch. And, if it’s low tide, you can take the short stroll across the mouth of the lake and then onto the beach – it’s almost like walking on water.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/canoeing-paddling-experiences/woolgoolga-lake/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Woolgoolga Lake.

Getting there and parking

Woolgoolga Lake is in the north of Coffs Coast Regional Park, just south of Safety Beach. To get there, take Beach Street and then turn onto Wharf Street. This becomes Lake Road. Continue for about 1km, when you’ll see a caravan park, extensive parklands and access to Woolgoolga Lake.

Road quality

  • Sealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available at Woolgoolga Lake. It can be a busy place on the weekend, so parking might be limited.

Best times to visit

Spring

Head to one of the Park's headlands for stunning coastal views and to watch whales.

Summer

The beaches of the park are your playground - go swimming surfing, snorkling and more.

Winter

A great time to walk the Solitary Islands coastal walk.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

17°C and 29°C

Winter temperature

Average

5°C and 20°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

March

Driest month

August

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

388.2mm

Facilities

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Gas/electric barbecues (free)
  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Drinking water

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Beach safety

Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Paddling safety

To make your paddling or kayaking adventure safer and more enjoyable, check out these paddling safety tips.

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Pets

You can bring your dog to this location. See other regional parks in NSW that have dog-friendly areas.

Dogs are permitted at Woolgoogla Lake - you will need to keep them on a leash at all times and remember to pick up after them.

Prohibited

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

Woolgoolga Lake is in Coffs Coast Regional Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Life’s a beach

Surfer at Ocean View Beach, Coffs Coast Regional Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

Golden beaches are the park’s premier attraction. Here, everything revolves around the water – whether you’re swimming and surfing in it, or walking and fishing beside it. Spend your days discovering the headland walking tracks, boat ramps, parklands and playgrounds. And no matter where you go, you’re bound to find a perfect spot for a beachside picnic. There are also plenty of dog-friendly areas at Coffs Coast Regional Park – just another of its popular features. Take your dog for a walk along one of the coastal paths, plus, there are several beaches with leash-free zones, meaning your pooch can zip about and enjoy the sand and sea as much as you do. The leash-free area around Corindi and Pipeclay beaches is a local favourite.

  • Arrawarra Headland Soak up views of Solitary Islands Marine Park from Arrawarra Headland and Beach near Coffs Harbour. Fishing, surfing, swimming – it’s all here waiting for you to enjoy.
  • Diggers Beach Located opposite the Big Banana in Coffs Harbour, Diggers Beach is excellent for surfing and learning to surf, plus fishing, swimming, birdwatching and beach walking.
  • Emerald Beach Positioned near Look-at-me-now Headland, 20km from Coffs Harbour, Emerald Beach is a local surfing hotspot. Visit also for fishing or swimming, or for barbecues in the picnic area.
  • Mullaway Beach and Headland Head south from Arrawarra to discover beautiful Mullaway Headland and Beach, near Coffs Harbour. Make the most of its picnic area and barbecues, go fishing or swimming.

Whale watchers

Sitting under a tree by Woolgoola Beach. Photo: Rob Cleary

Coffs Coast Regional Park is a fantastic place to enjoy watching these majestic creatures on their long coastal journey. Look-At-Me-Now Headland near Emerald Beach is a great vantage point, but locals agree Woolgoolga Headland is your best bet for glimpsing humpbacks. In fact, it’s also known as ‘Whale Watch Headland’. Plan a trip between June and October to see this inspiring sight.

  • Woolgoolga Beach and Headland Woolgoolga Beach and Headland has the best whale watching in the Coffs Region, plus great surfing, fishing and picnics and scenic views.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • White-bellied sea eagle. Photo: John Turbill

    White-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster)

    White-bellied sea eagles can be easily identified by their white tail and dark grey wings. These raptors are often spotted cruising the coastal breezes throughout Australia, and make for some scenic bird watching. Powerful Australian birds of prey, they are known to mate for life, and return each year to the same nest to breed.

  • Brown-striped frog. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

    Brown-striped frog (Lymnastes peronii)

    One of the most common frogs found in Australia, the ground-dwelling brown-striped frog lives in ponds, dams and swamps along the east coast. Also known as the striped marsh frog, this amphibian grows to 6.5cm across and has a distinctive ‘tok’ call that can be heard all year round.

  • Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Photo: Peter Sherratt

    Yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

    The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is one of the largest species of parrot. With dusty-black plumage, they have a yellow tail and cheek patch. They’re easily spotted while bird watching, as they feed on seeds in native forests and pine plantations.

  • Echidna. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

    One of only 2 egg-laying mammals in the world, the short-beaked echidna is one of the most widespread of Australian native animals. Covered in spines, or quills, they’re equipped with a keen sense of smell and a tube-like snout which they use to break apart termite mounds in search of ants.

  •  Blue Tongue lizard. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Eastern blue-tongue lizard (Tiliqua scinciodes)

    The eastern blue-tongue lizard, one of the largest skinks in Australia, is found throughout most of NSW. When threatened, the eastern blue-tongue lizard displays its blue tongue in a wide-mouthed intimidating show. Not an agile animal, they feed on slow-moving beetles and snails.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)