Ten Mile Hollow campground

Dharug National Park

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Overview

Set up your tent and relax at remote Ten Mile Hollow, in Dharug National Park. Only accessible by walking or cycling, it's a beautifully tranquil rest stop on the multi-day Old Great North Road hike.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 6
Camping type Tent, Remote/backpack camping
Where Simpsons Track, Ten Mile Hollow, NSW, 2250 - in Dharug National Park
Facilities Barbecue facilities, toilets
What to bring Drinking water, cooking water, firewood
Price There are no camping fees at this campground but a $6 booking fee applies.
Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • If you are undertaking an extended or overnight walk or ride, carry adequate water, food, warm and protective clothing, a compass and topographical maps, and inform relatives or friends of your intended route and date of return
  • This is an important heritage area, please leave convict sites and the landscape and vegetation of Dharug National Park as you find them
  • Please observe all fire restrictions, use the fireplaces provided and take care when visiting the park in the fire danger period between October and April
  • If you’re riding a mountain bike, please keep to the road and consider walkers

Ten Mile Hollow campground is a great place to stop overnight when you’re walking the multi-day walk along the World Heritage-listed Old Great North Road.

Accessed by foot or bike only, this basic campground is bound to be a welcome sight after a day spent walking or cycling. Ease your tired legs and enjoy a campfire and dinner, ready for a good sleep and another day of exploring this rugged park.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/ten-mile-hollow-campground/local-alerts

Bookings

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Ten Mile Hollow campground.

Getting there and parking

Access to the campground is via Old Great North Road by foot or bike only:

  • Park your car at Wisemans Ferry and take the ferry across to the trailhead, which is about 500m west of the ferry, on the northern side of the river. 
  • The campground is approximately 16km from the trailhead.
  • You'll need to carry all your camping equipment and drinking water from the trailhead to the campground.

You can also reach the trailhead by taking Wisemans Ferry Road from the F3.

Road quality

  • Sealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available at Wisemans Ferry.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Dharug National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

The water has warmed up nicely by late summer so autumn is great for kayaking and canoeing along the Hawkesbury river.

Spring

The spring months are perfect for enjoying more strenuous activities in the park, like the longer walks and mountain bike riding. It's also the perfect time to see wildflowers.

Winter

The park is still stunning in winter and walking on sunny days is very pleasant. It can be cold at night so bring warm gear if you're camping.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

13°C and 27°C

Highest recorded

42.9°C

Winter temperature

Average

8°C and 18°C

Lowest recorded

-0.1°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

February and March

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

230.2mm

Facilities

  • Drinking water is scarce within the park. Please remember to boil or treat water taken from tanks.
  • Please take your rubbish home with you

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Barbecue facilities

  • Fire rings (bring your own firewood)

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Prohibited

Drones

Flying a drone for recreational purposes is prohibited in this area. Drones may affect public enjoyment, safety and privacy, interfere with park operations, or pose a threat to wildlife. See the Drones in Parks policy.

This area may be a declared Drone Exclusion Zone, or may be subject to Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) rules for flying near airports, aerodromes and helicopter landing sites. See CASA's Drone Flyer Rules.

Commercial filming and photography

Commercial filming or photography is prohibited without prior consent. You must apply for permission and contact the local office.

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

Ten Mile Hollow campground is in Dharug National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Aboriginal heritage

Devines Hill, Dharug National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

Dharug National Park is the traditional Country of the Dharug Aboriginal people. Abundant in animal, plant and bird life, the area was a rich source of food, medicines and shelter. The park's diverse landscapes and all they contain feature in all aspects of Aboriginal culture and are associated with Dreaming stories and cultural learning that is still passed on today.

Rugged beauty

Devines Hill loop, Dharug National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

From the rugged bushland containing gang-gang cockatoos, satin bowerbirds and Lewin's honeyeaters to the sparkling waters of the creeks and the rich colours of the sandstone cliffs and formations, Dharug National Park offers a diverse range of landscapes. Bring your bike, bushwalk, camp by the creek, canoe on the Hawkesbury or make the most of the backdrop with your camera, there is so much to explore.

Step into Australia’s past

The Old Great North Road walk, Dharug National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Dharug National Park contains the Old Great North Road, one of 11 historic sites which form the Australian Convict Sites World Heritage property. It's a spectacular example of early colonial engineering and demonstrates the use of convict labour; up to 720 convicts - some in chains - worked on the road, which spanned 264km, connecting Sydney to the settlements of the Hunter Valley. Only 43km of the road remains relatively intact, running from Wisemans Ferry in the south to Mount Manning in the north and includes the oldest surviving stone bridges in mainland Australia. It makes a great walk to explore over two or three days or an exhilarating day's cycle.

  • Convict history of Wisemans Ferry Join a NSW National Parks guide on this 6km guided tour. You'll learn about the incredibly tough conditions and hardship endured by the road gang convicts of the early 19th century.
  • Devines Hill loop Head to Devines Hill loop in Dharug National Park, near Wisemans Ferry this weekend for a bike ride or walk along the historic World Heritage-listed Devines Hill loop.
  • Old Great North Road - World Heritage walk Old Great North Road – World Heritage walk highlights a historic convict-built road with scenic river views, via Finchs Line, in Dharug National Park.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

    With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

  • Australian brush turkey, Dorrigo National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Australian brush turkey (Alectura lathami)

    The Australian brush turkey, also known as bush or scrub turkey, can be found in rainforests along eastern NSW. With a striking red head, blue-black plumage and booming call, these distinctive Australian birds are easy to spot while bird watching in several NSW national parks.

  • Bare-nosed wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

    Bare-nosed wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian bare-nosed wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • Lace monitor, Daleys Point walking track, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    Lace monitor (Varanus varius)

    One of Australia’s largest lizards, the carnivorous tree-dwelling lace monitor, or tree goanna, can grow to 2m in length and is found in forests and coastal tablelands across eastern Australia. These Australian animals are typically dark blue in colour with whitish spots or blotches.

Plants

  • Gymea lily. Photo: Simone Cottrell

    Gymea lily (Doryanthes excelsa)

    The magnificent Gymea lily is one of the most unusual Australian native plants, found only along the coast and surrounding bushland of the Sydney Basin, from Newcastle to Wollongong. In spring this giant lily shoots out spectacular red flowers that can reach heights of 2-4m.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)