Camp Blackman

Warrumbungle National Park

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Overview

Camp Blackman is a popular base from which to explore Warrumbungle National Park. It's equipped with barbecues, picnic tables, hot showers and resident kangaroos.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 105
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Caravan site, Camping beside my vehicle
Where 4263 John Renshaw Parkway, Warrumbungle, NSW, 2828 - in Warrumbungle National Park
Facilities Amenities block, picnic tables, barbecue facilities, drinking water, public phone, showers, toilets
What to bring Firewood
Price

Rates and availability are displayed when making an online booking. A minimum daily rate applies which includes the first 2 occupants.

Entry fees Park entry fees apply
Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • There are 73 unpowered sites and 32 powered sites
  • Camping areas can be very busy during spring and autumn school holidays, Easter and the October long weekend so powered sites may be in short supply at these times.
  • This campground is within the Dark Sky Park boundary. Please see our guide for suitable camping lights and use in this park, available at the visitor centre.

This well-equipped campground, suitable for caravans, camper trailers, campervans, motor homes and tents, is a fantastic place to get away with family and friends. Camp Blackman can be a popular place during school holidays, so in addition to lots of kangaroos, sulphur crested cockatoos, white-winged choughs, kookaburras and butcher birds, there are bound to be lots of family groups.

Your campsite won’t be far from some of the park's walking and cycling tracks - make sure to take your bikes and walking shoes so you can explore. If you’re visiting in spring, you might be treated to the sight and smell of the wildflowers that line the tracks, like western golden wattle, smooth darling pea and kangaroo thorn.

After your adventures in Warrumbungle National Park, return to Camp Blackman for a hot shower and tasty barbecue before settling in to see the evening stars.

Take a virtual tour of Camp Blackman captured with Google Street View Trekker.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/camp-blackman/local-alerts

Bookings

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Camp Blackman.

Getting there and parking

From Coonabarabran, travel along John Renshaw Parkway to the park. Take the turnoff to the visitor centre, then travel past the visitor centre to the campground.

Road quality

  • Sealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available at Camp Blackman.

Best times to visit

You may experience a great range of temperatures on any day in the park. In summer it's generally hot in the daytime and temperatures often exceed 30C. In contrast, winter can be very cold and the temperature drops below freezing at night. Rainfall is also highly variable, ranging from drought to prolonged wet periods. Less rain falls on the western side of the park than on the eastern side. It rains most from December to February and the annual average rainfall is 720mm. Thunderstorms are common in mid to late summer.

Spring

During early spring wildflowers are in bloom, including a huge variety of golden wattle flowers With a more moderate climate, spring is a great time to get out and camp under the stars .

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

15°C and 30°C

Highest recorded

42.6°C

Winter temperature

Average

0°C and 15°C

Lowest recorded

-9°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

January

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

176.3mm

Facilities

Amenities

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets
  • Flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)
  • Gas/electric barbecues (free)

Drinking water

Public phone

Showers

  • Hot showers
  • Cold showers

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Accessibility

Disability access level - medium

Assistance may be required to access this area.

  • Toilet facilities are wheelchair accessible, however the showers are not.

Permitted

Camp fires and solid fuel burners

Wood fires are permitted in the park - you'll need to bring your own firewood as it must not be collected from the park

Prohibited

Drones

Flying a drone for recreational purposes is prohibited in this area. Drones may affect public enjoyment, safety and privacy, interfere with park operations, or pose a threat to wildlife. See the Drones in Parks policy.

This area may be a declared Drone Exclusion Zone, or may be subject to Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) rules for flying near airports, aerodromes and helicopter landing sites. See CASA's Drone Flyer Rules.

Commercial filming and photography

Commercial filming or photography is prohibited without prior consent. You must apply for permission and contact the local office.

Generators

Generators are prohibited at this campground

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Visitor centre

Learn more

Camp Blackman is in Warrumbungle National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Aboriginal dreamtime

The view across the mountain range, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

Warrumbungle is a Gamilaroi (also written Gamilaraay) word meaning crooked mountain, and for many thousands of years it has been a spiritual place for the custodians of this land, the Gamilaroi, the Wiradjuri and the Weilwan. The landscape, plants and animals of the park are a constant reminder of its sacred significance to Aboriginal people today. Take an Aboriginal Discovery guided tour to find out more about the Aboriginal cultural heritage.

Diversity of wildlife

Kangaroos, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

Warrumbungle National Park has a rich diversity of landforms and microclimates, and provides a habitat for hundreds of plant and animal species in the area. Flourishing with vibrant Warrumbungle Range wattle, geebung and broad-leaf hop-bush, there's an abundance of rich birdlife in the area, including species such as emus, wedge-tailed eagles and boobook owls - just a few of over 190 bird species recorded in the park. If you're lucky, you may also spot wildlife such as the ringtail possum, greater glider and brush-tailed rock wallaby. Be sure to also keep an eye out for blue-tongue lizards and lace monitors rustling through the bush.

  • Burbie Canyon walking track Burbie Canyon walking track in Warrumbungle National Park offers a gentle 2km stroll through a sandstone gorge, and is particularly popular for birdwatching.

Landscape and geology

Rocky pinnacle, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Steve Alton

The landscape of Warrumbungle National Park has been shaped by thousands of years of volcanic activity; spend some time looking at Crater Bluff and Belougery Spire and imagine the vents of magma that once erupted to create these formations. Old lava flows created at Mount Exmouth and Siding Spring Mountain, just outside the boundary of the park and Belougery Split Rock and Bluff Mountain are great examples of volcanic action. The most iconic feature in the park, The Breadknife, is a volcanic dyke which stands a massive 90m tall.

  • Bluff Mountain walking track Bluff Mountain walking track rewards experienced, fit bushwalkers with Warrumbungle National Park’s best views. This very long and challenging steep hike climbs past spectacular rock spires and domes—up to the summit of Bluff Mountain.
  • Breadknife and Grand High Tops walk Breadknife and Grand High Tops walk in Warrumbungle National Park, regarded as one of the best walks in NSW, offers close up views of the park’s iconic rock formations.
  • Burbie Canyon walking track Burbie Canyon walking track in Warrumbungle National Park offers a gentle 2km stroll through a sandstone gorge, and is particularly popular for birdwatching.
  • Coonabarabran - Baradine - Warrumbungle drive Explore the spectacular landscapes, historic towns, picnic spots and walks of the Warrumbungles and Pilliga, near Coonabarabran and Baradine, in NSW.
  • Coonabarabran - Warrumbungle - Tooraweenah drive Coonabarabran – Warrumbungle – Tooraweenah drive offers car touring through scenic mountain views with picnicking, walking, and wheelchair accessible facilities in Warrumbungle National Park.
  • Goulds Circuit walking track Goulds Circuit walking track is a wonderful way for day trippers and overnight campers to capture sweeping views of Warrumbungle National Park’s volcanic features.
Show more

Wish upon a star

Whitegum lookout, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

Warrumbungle National Park is Australia’s only Dark Sky Park. Nearby Coonabarabran is known as the 'Astronomy Capital of Australia'. Stargaze from your campsite, or if you want to see right up to the heavens, visit the Siding Springs Observatory. The dramatic mix of volcanic spires and domes, plateaus, forested ridges and tall volcanic dykes are bound to make even the youngest of photographers look good, so whatever you do ‐ don't forget your camera.

  • Canyon picnic area Canyon picnic area is a fully accessible, family friendly picnic area in Warrumbungle National Park. Not far from the visitor centre, it features barbecues and tables.
  • Warrumbungle Visitor Centre Visitor information is available at the Warrumbungle Visitor Centre, which is now back in its original location. Get great suggestions and tips for walking and camping in Warrumbungle National Park.
  • Whitegum lookout Whitegum lookout in Warrumbungle National Park features spectacular views of the landscape and picnic tables. It is wheelchair accessible and an easy walk for children.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

  • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

    The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

  • Southern boobook. Photo: David Cook

    Southern boobook (Ninox novaeseelandiae)

    The southern boobook, also known as the mopoke, is the smallest and most common native owl in Australia. With a musical 'boo-book' call that echoes through forests and woodlands, the southern boobook is a great one to look out for while bird watching.

  • Tawny frogmouth. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)

    Found throughout Australia, the tawny frogmouth is often mistaken for an owl due to its wide, powerful beak, large head and nocturnal hunting habits. The ‘oom oom oom’ call of this native bird can be heard echoing throughout a range of habitats including heath, woodlands and urban areas.

  • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

    Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

    Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)