Rouse Hill Regional Park

Overview

Dog-friendly Rouse Hill Regional Park is great for a picnic or barbecue. There is a lot to do; head to the playground, go bike riding, or take a stroll down to Second Ponds Creek.

Read more about Rouse Hill Regional Park

Rouse Hill Regional Park is a fabulous resource for Hills District locals and visitors alike. Hire the relaxed Crebra or Fibrosa Pavilions for a special occasion, take a family bike ride on the trails, organise a birthday picnic or just go for a rejuvenating walk.

Kids love the adventure playground and the tracks are great for riding scooters and bikes – it’s the perfect spot for a barbeque or picnic lunch with family and friends. You can even bring your dog along.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/rouse-hill-regional-park/local-alerts

Contact

  • in the Sydney and surrounds region
  • Rouse Hill Regional Park opens at 8am and closes at 5pm (8pm during daylight savings). The park may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

  • More
See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Rouse Hill Regional Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Rouse Hill Regional Park is located on Worcester Rd, Rouse Hill. To get there:

    • Exit the M7 at Old Windsor Road (which eventually becomes Windsor Road) and turn right to travel north
    • At Rouse Hill, turn left into Rouse Road
    • Turn right into Worcester Road and follow signs for Rouse Hill Regional Park

    Park entry points

    Parking

    • Rouse Hill picnic area and playground See on map

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    Best times to visit

    Rouse Hill Regional Park is a great place to visit all year round. Head to the park for an early morning jog in spring, a weekend picnic in the winter sun or enjoy a day of bike riding in autumn.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    17°C and 28°C

    Highest recorded

    41.7°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    4°C and 19°C

    Lowest recorded

    –3.9°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    February

    Driest month

    July

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    250mm

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Permitted

    Pets

    You can walk your dog at this location. See other regional parks in NSW that have dog walking areas.

    Prohibited

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Rouse Hill (2 km)

    Located north-west of the Sydney CBD in the Hills District, Rouse Hill is home to Rouse Hill Regional Park, where you can take your dog for a walk, enjoy a picnic with family and friends, and even hire an outdoor wedding venue.

    www.thehills.nsw.gov.au

    Parramatta (21 km)

    Parramatta offers a fascinating insight into early colonial life in Australia. Don't miss a visit to Old Government House, now one of 11 Australian Convict Sites on the UNESCO World Heritage list.

    www.sydney.com

    Sydney City Centre (44 km)

    No trip to Sydney is complete without spending some time in the city’s beautiful parks. Whether it’s in central areas like Hyde Park or the Royal Botanic Gardens or further out in Centennial Parklands, there’s plenty of green space to go out and enjoy.

    www.sydney.com

    Learn more

    Rouse Hill Regional Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Beautiful venue

    Fibrosa Pavillion, Rouse Hill Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    If you're looking for a memorable location for your wedding or special event, think about hiring the Crebra or Fibrosa Pavilions. These fabulous open pavilions sit strikingly in the landscape, allowing your guests to enjoy the surroundings while being sheltered from the elements. Every weekend Rouse Hill Regional Park is full of the sounds of families enjoying themselves riding bikes around the trails, clambering about the adventure playground, enjoying a kids' party at the barbecues and taking the dog for a walk. There's plenty of room to stretch your legs in the wide open spaces; once the paddocks of Rouse Hill House.

    • Fibrosa and Crebra Pavilions Fibrosa and Crebra Pavilions are great locations for a family celebration or birthday party. Perfect for small or large gatherings, there are picnic tables and barbecues surrounded by green space.
    • Rouse Hill picnic area and playground Dog-friendly Rouse Hill Regional Park is a great day out – enjoy a barbecue, walk or bike ride and let the kids explore the playground. It’s great for a birthday party.

    Woodland surrounds

    Ironbark Ridge, Rouse Hill Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    Angophora species such as broad-leaved apple trees and eucalypt varieties like grey box and forest red gum are prevalent throughout Cumberland Plain woodland, supported by Rouse Hill Regional Park. Other endangered ecological communities found in the area include shale sandstone transition forest and Sydney coastal river-flat forest. Rouse Hill Regional Park is also a significant home to local endangered microbats, such as the fishing bat.

    • Second Ponds Creek walk Go for a bike ride or take your dog for a walk along the short Second Ponds Creek walk in Rouse Hill Regional Park. It’s a great way to start or finish to your picnic.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Brush tail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

      One of the most widespread of Australian tree-dwelling marsupials, the common brushtail possum is found across most of NSW in woodlands, rainforests and urban areas. With strong claws, a prehensile tail and opposable digits, these native Australian animals are well-adapted for life amongst the trees.

    • Tawny frogmouth. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

      Tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)

      Found throughout Australia, the tawny frogmouth is often mistaken for an owl due to its wide, powerful beak, large head and nocturnal hunting habits. The ‘oom oom oom’ call of this native bird can be heard echoing throughout a range of habitats including heath, woodlands and urban areas.

    • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Ingo Oeland

      Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

      The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Rouse Hill Regional Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

    Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

    Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Rouse Hill Regional Park. NPWS carries out risk assesments for new and emerging weeds as to protect biodiversity in this park.

    Conservation program

    Regional pest management strategies

    Weeds and pest animals cause substantial damage to agriculture and our environment, so it’s essential we manage them in NSW national parks and reserves. Our regional pest management strategies aim to minimise the impact of pests on biodiversity in NSW.  We work hard to protect our parks and neighbours from pests and weeds, ensuring measurable results.

    Developing visitor facilities and experiences

    The upkeep of Rouse Hill Regional Park’s visitor facilities is an NPWS priority. Programs relating to the review, management and enhancement of the park’s facilities are ongoing and its amenities and infrastructure receive regular maintenance.

    Managing fire

    NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

    Conservation program

    Planning for fire

    Bushfires are inevitable across fire-prone vegetation types within NSW national parks. NPWS prepares for wildfires by working with other fire agencies, reserve neighbours and the community to ensure protection of life, property and biodiversity. Every park has its own fire management strategy, devised in consultation with partner fire authorities and the community to plan and prioritise fire management.

    Iron Bark Ridge, Rouse Hill Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek