Buddong Falls walking track

Tumut area in Kosciuszko National Park

Affected by closures, check current alerts 

Overview

Buddong Falls walking track leads you through tall forest to a cascading waterfall in a remote part of Kosciuszko National Park’s Tumut area.

Where
Tumut area in Kosciuszko National Park
Accessibility
No wheelchair access
Distance
2.2km return
Time suggested
1hr 30min
Grade
Grade 4
Trip Intention Form

It's a good idea to let someone know where you're going. Fill in a trip intention form to send important details about your trip to your emergency contact.

If you're planning to hire a free Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) from one of these locations, please wait to fill in your form in person at that location.

What to
bring
Drinking water, sturdy shoes, first aid kit, personal locator beacon, suitable clothing, snacks, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • This walking track forms part of the multi-day Hume and Hovell track – a 426km trek that starts in Yass and finishes in Albury.
  • You can pick up maps and get more information at Tumut Visitor Centre.
  • This track is steep in places and requires a moderate level of fitness.

Starting from Buddong Falls campground, it’s an easy 400m walk to a view point for the upper falls. Take in the stunning views and listen for lyrebirds among the smooth barked ribbon gums and white flowered tea trees.

If you don’t mind steeper, rougher tracks, continue for another 400m to a sign pointing to the lower falls. After another 270m you’ll arrive near the base of the falls. From here you have magnificent views of Buddong Creek cascading 60m down a granite and shale cliff.

Come in spring and you might see pale yellow blackwood wattles and rust-brown royal grevilleas. Listen for the calls of white-throated treecreepers. If you’re staying overnight at the campground, keep a look out for red-necked wallabies, greater gliders and mountain brush-tailed possums.

Adventurous hikers looking for something longer can continue down Buddong Falls walking track to end up at Jounama Pondage or continue along Blowering Reservoir to Tumut. The further you go, you may need to camp the night or arrange a car pick-up.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Buddong Falls walking track - overview map

Buddong Falls walking track - overview map

Map legend

Map legend

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/buddong-falls-walking-track/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Buddong Falls walking track.

Track grading

Grade 4

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    1hr 30min

  • Quality of markings

    Clearly sign posted

  • Gradient

    Very steep

  • Distance

    2.2km return

  • Steps

    Occasional steps

  • Quality of path

    Formed track, some obstacles

  • Experience required

    Some bushwalking experience recommended

Getting there and parking

Buddong Falls walking track is in the Tumut area of Kosciuszko National Park. To get there from Talbingo:

  • Travel south to Tumut 3 Power Station.
  • Turn right onto Power Line Road, around 1km after passing the Power Station.
  • Continue until you reach the Buddong Falls sign. Turn right and travel 3km to Buddong Falls campground.
  • You can also reach the Buddong Falls turnoff by travelling north from Elliott Way.
  • Alternatively, drive via Yellowin, Snubba, Browns and De Beauzevilles tracks through Bago State Forest.

Road quality

  • Please watch out for logging trucks on forestry roads.
  • Buddong Falls is in a remote location accessed by narrow, winding roads. Please drive carefully and be aware of oncoming traffic and wildlife.
  • This walking track may not be accessible during wet weather.

  • Mixture of sealed and unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • Most roads require 4WD vehicle

Weather restrictions

  • Dry weather only

Parking

Parking is available at Buddong Falls campground, where the walking track begins.

Facilities

  • Please bring your own drinking water. Water is available at the creek, but you’ll need to boil or purify it.
  • The toilets, picnic tables and barbecues are located at Buddong Falls campground, where the walking track begins.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Water activities

Beaches, rivers and lakes in NSW national parks offer lots of opportunities for water activities. Please take care in the water and find out how to help your family and friends stay safe around water.

Accessibility

Disability access level - no wheelchair access

Prohibited

Cycling

Mountain biking is permitted on vehicle roads, but not along the walking track.

Drones

Flying a drone for recreational purposes is prohibited in this area. Drones may affect public enjoyment, safety and privacy, interfere with park operations, or pose a threat to wildlife. See the Drones in Parks policy.

This area may be a declared Drone Exclusion Zone, or may be subject to Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) rules for flying near airports, aerodromes and helicopter landing sites. See CASA's Drone Flyer Rules.

Commercial filming and photography

Commercial filming or photography is prohibited without prior consent. You must apply for permission and contact the local office.

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Visitor centre

Learn more

Buddong Falls walking track is in Tumut area. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Explore by water, wheels or walking

Tumut Visitor Centre, northern gateway to Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: E Sheargold

If you need some inspiration, stop by the Tumut Visitor Centre, for tips on top experiences, where to stay, and spot a corroboree frog in the display. Learn more about Kosciuszko National Park’s plants, animals and landscapes on an Aboriginal ranger-led tour (contact the visitor centre). Boat ramps on Blowering Reservoir, Talbingo Dam wall, and at O’Hares campground provide easy access for boating and paddling. There are also plenty of scenic drives, walking tracks and bike trails to tempt you away from the water. If you’re well-prepared, explore the remote Goobarragandra Wilderness or hike part of the 425km Hume and Hovell walking track.

  • Black Perry lookout Black Perry lookout, near Talbingo Mountain in Kosciuszko National Park, offers scenic views over the Snowy Mountains region, and is close to Tumut and Yarrangobilly Caves.
  • Tumut Visitor Centre Tumut Visitor Centre, on Snowy Mountains Highway, is the ideal starting point for a visit to northern Kosciuszko National Park, offering information, booking services, and souvenirs.

World-class wilderness

A woman stands next to a sign at Black Perry lookout, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer/OEH

In recognition of Kosciuszko's unique value as a conservation area, it’s been named a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. More than half of the park, over 350,000ha, has been declared wilderness, including the Bogong Peaks and Goobarragandra wilderness areas. Black Perry lookout is an excellent place to get a sense of the expansive wilderness areas in Kosciuszko's north.

Snowy Mountains history

Tumut 3 Power Station, Talbingo, near Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: E Sheargold

Tumut area’s more recent history can be seen at Blowering Reservoir, and just outside the park at Talbingo. The Snowy Hydro Scheme is recognised as one of the civil engineering wonders of the modern world. Its vast network of dams and power stations includes Blowering, Jounama and Talbingo reservoirs, and Tumut 3 Power Station, at Talbingo.

Unique landscapes

Landers Falls lookout, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer

The change in scenery is noticeable as you drive along Snowy Mountains Highway. The road climbs over 1000m from the Tumut River Valley, through woodland of mountain gum and narrow-leaf peppermint, to the treeless plains surrounding Kiandra.

  • Black Perry lookout Black Perry lookout, near Talbingo Mountain in Kosciuszko National Park, offers scenic views over the Snowy Mountains region, and is close to Tumut and Yarrangobilly Caves.
  • Landers Falls lookout walk Landers Falls lookout walk, tucked into the forest between Tumut and Kiandra, wows you with dramatic views of Landers Creek waterfall plunging into the rocky gorge above Talbingo Reservoir.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Swamp wallaby in Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

    The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

  • Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Photo: Peter Sherratt

    Yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

    The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is one of the largest species of parrot. With dusty-black plumage, they have a yellow tail and cheek patch. They’re easily spotted while bird watching, as they feed on seeds in native forests and pine plantations.

  • Brush tail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    One of the most widespread of Australian tree-dwelling marsupials, the common brushtail possum is found across most of NSW in woodlands, rainforests and urban areas. With strong claws, a prehensile tail and opposable digits, these native Australian animals are well-adapted for life amongst the trees.

  • Eastern common ringtail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus)

    Commonly found in forests, woodlands and leafy gardens across eastern NSW, the Australian ringtail possum is a tree-dwelling marsupial. With a powerful tail perfectly adapted to grasp objects, it forages in trees for eucalypt leaves, flowers and fruit.

  • Common wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

    Common wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian common wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • Emu, Paroo Darling National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

    The largest of Australian birds, the emu stands up to 2m high and is the second largest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Emus live in pairs or family groups. The male emu incubates and rears the young, which will stay with the adult emus for up to 2 years.

  • A juvenile platypus saved by National Parks and Wildlife staff. Photo: M Bannerman/OEH

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

    One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Echidna. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

    One of only 2 egg-laying mammals in the world, the short-beaked echidna is one of the most widespread of Australian native animals. Covered in spines, or quills, they’re equipped with a keen sense of smell and a tube-like snout which they use to break apart termite mounds in search of ants.

  •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

    With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

Environments in this area

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