Warrumbungles 4-day guided adventure

Warrumbungle National Park

Closed due to current alerts 

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Overview

Experience the rugged volcanic landscape of the Warrumbungles with Take Shape Adventures. You’ll see iconic rock formations and celestial light shows on this 4-day guided adventure in Warrumbungle National Park.

When

Contact Take Shape Adventures for tour dates and times.

Accessibility
No wheelchair access
Grade
Medium. Suitable for adults 21 years and over. You'll walk on grade 3 and 4 tracks. A moderate level of fitness is required for this tour.
Price
Contact Take Shape Adventures for pricing.
Entry fees

Tour price includes park entry fee.

Meeting point
Contact Take Shape Adventures to arrange pick up from Newcastle Airport or in Newcastle CBD.
Bookings
Bookings required. Book online or email or call Take Shape Adventures on 0400 307 130.
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Explore a stunning landscape formed by an ancient and truly mighty volcano with Take Shape Adventures. You'll hike through the heart of this former volcano to marvel at spectacular rock pillars that soar up into the sky.

Setting out from Newcastle, head to Warrumbungle National Park to embark on a series of walks with your experienced guides. Challenging treks to the park’s famous rock formations will be broken up with smaller trails. At night, you’ll learn why this popular stargazing destination was named Australia’s first Dark Sky Park. The trip includes a visit to a local observatory where astronomers will guide you through the dazzling night sky.

You’ll stay in comfortable accommodation with all meals provided by Take Shape Adventures. Return through the Hunter Valley to sample local cider (if time permits), rounding out this unforgettable adventure.

Take Shape Adventures is a licensed commercial tour operator with a Parks Eco Pass.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/guided-tours/warrumbungles-4-day-guided-adventure/local-alerts

Operated by

Take Shape Adventures logo. Photo © Take Shape Adventures

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Warrumbungles 4-day guided adventure.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Contact Take Shape Adventures for directions.

    Parking

    Contact Take Shape Adventures for information on parking.

    Maps and downloads

    Accessibility

    Disability access level - no wheelchair access

    Visitor centre

    Learn more

    Warrumbungles 4-day guided adventure is in Warrumbungle National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Aboriginal dreamtime

    The view across the mountain range, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Warrumbungle is a Gamilaraay word meaning crooked mountain, and for many thousands of years it has been a spiritual place for the custodians of this land, the Gamilaraay, the Wiradjuri and the Weilwan. The landscape, plants and animals of the park are a constant reminder of its sacred significance to Aboriginal people today. Take an Aboriginal Discovery guided tour to find out more about the Aboriginal cultural heritage.

    • Tara Cave walking track Tara Cave walking track is a gentle 3.4km return bushwalk through Warrumbungle National Park, near Coonabarabran. Learn about local Aboriginal culture and experience remarkable views.

    Diversity of wildlife

    Kangaroos, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Warrumbungle National Park has a rich diversity of landforms and microclimates, and provides a habitat for hundreds of plant and animal species. Flourishing with wildflowers and unique plants, such as Warrumbungle Range wattle, Warrumbungle star flower, golden cassinia and grey ray flower, the area also has an abundance of rich birdlife, including emus, wedge-tailed eagles and turquoise parrots - just a few of over 190 bird species recorded in the park. If you're lucky, you may also spot wildlife such as the koala, squirrel glider and brush-tailed rock wallaby. Be sure to also keep an eye out for Warrumbungle black rock skink high on the mountains, and lace monitors rustling through the bush.

    • Burbie Canyon walking track Burbie Canyon walking track in Warrumbungle National Park offers a gentle 2km stroll through a sandstone gorge, and is particularly popular for birdwatching.
    • Walk on the wild side at the Warrumbungles Join an experienced National Parks guide and explore the beauty of Warrumbungle National Park. This tour is designed to bring your senses alive as you explore the sights, sounds and smells of this beautiful area.
    • Whitegum lookout walking track Whitegum lookout walking track is a short, wheelchair-accessible walk in Warrumbungle National Park. Suitable for all ages, it offers remarkable views.

    Landscape and geology

    Rocky pinnacle, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Steve Alton

    The landscape of Warrumbungle National Park has been shaped by millions of years of volcanic activity and erosion; spend some time looking at Crater Bluff and Belougery Spire and imagine the vents of magma that once erupted to create these formations. Layers of lava and volcanic rock created Mount Exmouth and Mount Woorut just outside the boundary of the park, and Belougery Split Rock and Bluff Mountain are great examples of igneous lava domes. One of the most iconic features in the park, The Breadknife, is a volcanic dyke which stands a massive 90m tall. You can learn more about the park's fascinating geological history, or take a self-guided geology tour, through the NSW GeoTours app.

    • Bluff Mountain walking track Bluff Mountain walking track rewards experienced, fit bushwalkers with Warrumbungle National Park’s best views. This very long and challenging steep hike climbs past spectacular rock spires and domes—up to the summit of Bluff Mountain.
    • Breadknife and Grand High Tops walk Breadknife and Grand High Tops walk in Warrumbungle National Park, regarded as one of the best walks in NSW, offers close up views of the park’s iconic rock formations.
    • Burbie Canyon walking track Burbie Canyon walking track in Warrumbungle National Park offers a gentle 2km stroll through a sandstone gorge, and is particularly popular for birdwatching.
    • Coonabarabran - Baradine - Warrumbungle drive Explore the spectacular landscapes, historic towns, picnic spots and walks of the Warrumbungles and Pilliga, near Coonabarabran and Baradine, in NSW.
    • Coonabarabran - Warrumbungle - Tooraweenah drive Coonabarabran – Warrumbungle – Tooraweenah drive offers car touring through scenic mountain views with picnicking, walking, and wheelchair accessible facilities in Warrumbungle National Park.
    • Explore the Dark Sky These school holidays, experience the wonders of the night sky at Warrumbungle National Park, near Coonabarabran. It's Australia’s first officially accredited Dark Sky Park.
    • Goulds Circuit walking track Goulds Circuit walking track is a wonderful way for day trippers and overnight campers to capture sweeping views of Warrumbungle National Park’s volcanic features.
    • Warrumbungles 4-day guided adventure Experience the rugged volcanic landscape of the Warrumbungles with Take Shape Adventures. You’ll see iconic rock formations and celestial light shows on this 4-day guided adventure in Warrumbungle National Park.
    • Whitegum lookout walking track Whitegum lookout walking track is a short, wheelchair-accessible walk in Warrumbungle National Park. Suitable for all ages, it offers remarkable views.
    Show more

    Wish upon a star

    Whitegum lookout, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

    Warrumbungle National Park is Australia’s first Dark Sky Park. Nearby Coonabarabran is known as the 'Astronomy Capital of Australia'. Stargaze from your campsite, or if you want to see right up to the heavens, visit a local observatory. The dramatic mix of volcanic spires and domes, plateaus, forested ridges and tall volcanic dykes are bound to make even the youngest of photographers look good, so whatever you do ‐ don't forget your camera.

    • Canyon picnic area Canyon picnic area is a fully accessible, family friendly picnic area in Warrumbungle National Park. Not far from the visitor centre, it features barbecues and tables.
    • Warrumbungle Visitor Centre Visitor information is available at the Warrumbungle Visitor Centre, which is now back in its original location. Get great suggestions and tips for walking and camping in Warrumbungle National Park.
    • Whitegum lookout Whitegum lookout in Warrumbungle National Park features spectacular views of the landscape and picnic tables. It is wheelchair accessible and an easy walk for children.

    Plants and animals protected in this park

    Animals

    • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

      Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

      With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

    • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

      Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

      The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

    • Southern boobook. Photo: David Cook

      Southern boobook (Ninox novaeseelandiae)

      The southern boobook, also known as the mopoke, is the smallest and most common native owl in Australia. With a musical 'boo-book' call that echoes through forests and woodlands, the southern boobook is a great one to look out for while bird watching.

    • Tawny frogmouth. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

      Tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)

      Found throughout Australia, the tawny frogmouth is often mistaken for an owl due to its wide, powerful beak, large head and nocturnal hunting habits. The ‘oom oom oom’ call of this native bird can be heard echoing throughout a range of habitats including heath, woodlands and urban areas.

    • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

      Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

      Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)