Three Mile Dam campground

Selwyn area in Kosciuszko National Park

Open, check current alerts 

Overview

Set up camp at lakeside Three Mile Dam campground, a great base to explore the walks, mountain biking, fishing, and cross-country skiing in central and northern Kosciuszko National Park, near Kiandra and Selwyn snowfields.

Accommodation Details
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Caravan site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, carpark, toilets
What to bring Firewood
Opening times

The gate to this campground is closed from the June long weekend to October long weekend. Camping is still possible for walkers.

Price There are no camping fees at this campground but a $6 booking fee applies.
Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note

Sites are not marked or powered.

As well as being unbeatable for fishing, bushwalking and a good dose of outdoor relaxation, Three Mile Dam campground offers Aussie heritage in spades.

Established during the Kiandra gold-mining era, the dam provided water for sluicing operations via race lines to Kiandra (New Chum Hill). Its eastern side was part of the Snowy Mountains Hydro Electric Scheme.

There are no marked sites but you’ll find plenty of room for your tent, camper trailer or caravan amidst the grassy sub-alpine woodland. Bask in the shelter of the surrounding snow gums, and make use of the handy facilities including barbecues and picnic tables.

It’s a good spot to visit in warmer weather as a stopover on the Khancoban to Kiandra scenic drive or Snowy Mountains Highway. A carpet of snow daisies and billy buttons enhance a springtime camping trip.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/three-mile-dam-campground/local-alerts

Bookings

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Three Mile Dam campground .

Getting there and parking

Three Mile Dam campground is located in the Kiandra Selwyn area of Koscciuszko National Park.

To get there from Tumut or Adaminaby via Kiandra:

  • Drive 75.5km south of Tumut, or 37.7km east of Adaminaby, along Snowy Mountains Highway
  • Take the Kiandra-Cabramurra Road turn-off (signposted Link Road).
  • Three Mile Dam campground is 5.8km on your right

To get there from Khancoban via Cabramurra (closed winter):

  •  Take Alpine Way west from Khancoban for 5.8km to the Swampy Plains Creek Road turnoff
  • Follow the signs for 60km to the Cabramurra turn-off
  • From here, follow Goat Ridge Road, then turn right at Link Road towards Kiandra
  • Three Mile Dam is around 9.6km on your left

Road quality

  • It's recommended that all vehicles carry snow chains from the June to October long weekends. Read our snow driving in Kosciuszko tips.

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • Snow chains required after snow

Parking

Parking is available at most of the campsites.

Facilities

Dam water is available at this campground, but you’ll need to treat or boil it before drinking.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Alpine safety

Alpine areas present special safety issues. Conditions can be extreme and may change rapidly, particularly in winter. It’s important to be prepared and find out how to stay safe in alpine areas.

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Generators

Prohibited

Drones

Flying a drone for recreational purposes is prohibited in this area. Drones may affect public enjoyment, safety and privacy, interfere with park operations, or pose a threat to wildlife. See the Drones in Parks policy.

This area may be a declared Drone Exclusion Zone, or may be subject to Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) rules for flying near airports, aerodromes and helicopter landing sites. See CASA's Drone Flyer Rules.

Commercial filming and photography

Commercial filming or photography is prohibited without prior consent. You must apply for permission and contact the local office.

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

Three Mile Dam campground is in Selwyn area. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Kiandra's claims to fame

Kiandra Heritage track, Kosciszko National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer/NSW Government

The discovery of gold at Kiandra in 1859 attracted up to 10,000 prospectors hoping to strike it rich. Just 18 months later, after harsh winters and falling gold finds, only a few hundred gold miners remained. It's remembered as one of Australia’s shortest gold rushes, not to mention it’s highest (and coldest). In 1861, Kiandra became the birthplace of skiing in Australia, when Norwegian gold miners fashioned skis from fence palings. By the 1870s regular ski carnivals were arranged, and Australia had its first official ski slope here. Mining continued into the 1930s, with grazing and winter skiing also keeping the community alive. Before devastating fires in 2019-2020, four buildings still stood here, including Kiandra Courthouse, which had served as a courthouse, private residence, ski chalet, hotel and bar.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Common wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

    Common wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian common wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • A juvenile platypus saved by National Parks and Wildlife staff. Photo: M Bannerman/OEH

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

    One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

Plants

  • Billy Button flowers at Peery Lake picnic area. Photo: Dinitee Haskard OEH

    Billy buttons (Craspedia spp. )

    Billy buttons are attractive Australian native plants that are widespread throughout eastern NSW in dry forest, grassland and alpine regions such as Kosciuszko National Park. The golden-yellow globe-shaped flowers are also known as woollyheads. Related to the daisy, billy buttons are an erect herb growing to a height of 50cm.

Environments in this area