Capertee National Park

Overview

Capertee National Park offers spectacular birdwatching, walking, camping as well as heritage homestead accommodation, west of Blue Mountains, near Lithgow.

Read more about Capertee National Park

For a unique wilderness holiday, head to Capertee National Park. Located west of Blue Mountains, Capertee protects a range of wildlife and plants found nowhere else on earth. Independent campers and adventurous families enjoy walking and mountain biking through this unique region while discovering both Aboriginal and European heritage.

Renowned for some of the best birdwatching in the state, the protected woodlands along the fertile river flats attract regent honeyeaters, woodland birds, and birdwatching enthusiasts alike. The park is also home to native Australian wildlife like kangaroos, wallaroos, wallabies and gliders.

Choose from a night under the stars at the campground, or enjoy the heritage charms of Capertee Homestead. Capertee National Park is also a great stopover if car touring around neighbouring Turon National Park and Gardens of Stone National Park.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/capertee-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Capertee National Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Capertee village:

    • Turn east onto Glen Davis Road
    • Travel 29km to the junction with Glen Alice Road and veer left
    • Drive another 21km through Glen Alice, towards Rylstone, and turn left onto the unsealed Port Macquarie Road.
    • Follow Port Macquarie Road to the locked gate at the park boundary (access code can be obtained from Mudgee office).

    Park entry points

    Parking

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    By public transport

    Capertee National Park is not accessible by public transport however there is a train/bus service to Mudgee or Lithgow. For information about public transport options, visit the NSW country transport website.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Capertee National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    The cooler autumn months are an excellent time for walking and mountain biking the trails and tracks within the park.

    Spring

    Grab your binoculars for some superb birdwatching. You might catch a rare glimpse of the endangered regent honeyeater as it builds its nest.

    Summer

    Enjoy a relaxing picnic on the shady banks of Capertee River, and perhaps a refreshing paddle in the shallow waters.

    Winter

    Enjoy a car tour of Capertee while taking in nearby Wollemi and Goulburn River National Parks.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    12.1°C and 25.5°C

    Highest recorded

    38.4°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    10.4°C and 0.7°C

    Lowest recorded

    -8°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    January

    Driest month

    September

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    179mm

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Rylstone (34 km)

    Rylstone is a pretty village with many heritage-listed stone buildings, including the magnificent post and telecommunications office, the police station, the courthouse and the shire hall. Boutiques and markets offer arts, crafts and other treasures.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Mudgee (91 km)

    Set in the Cudgegong River valley in Central West NSW, Mudgee is a charming historic town and a popular destination for wine enthusiasts keen to sample its award-winning reds and whites. From its many wineries and national parks to markets, festivals and activities for the kids, Mudgee has much to offer.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Lithgow (125 km)

    Hassans Walls Lookout, near Lithgow, is the highest in the Blue Mountains. Admire Mt Wilson, Mt York, Mt Tarana and Mt Blaxland as well as the pretty Hartley Valley below. To the south are the Kanimbla and Megalong valley and Mt Bindo. While there, go for a walk or ride around the lookout.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Capertee National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Wiradjuri country

    Looking over the escarpment in Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

    Capertee National Park is within the traditional lands of Wiradjuri People. The surrounding countryside contains evidence of Aboriginal occupation in the form of rock art, scarred trees and artefacts. Traditional food plants and old travel routes are also present within the park.

    Plant life abounds

    Eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

    The park is home to rare grey grevillea shrubs, which bloom with pink and red flowers in spring. This hardy, dense shrub is found nowhere else but Capertee Valley. Fertile river flats and surrounding slopes host an ecological community of majestic yellow box, blakelys red gum and white box, providing a vital habitat for wildlife and native birds.

    • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
    • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylstone.

    Looking for things to do in Capertee?

    Policeman's Point campground, Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

    There are great things to do when in Capertee. Enjoy fantastic bird watching any time of the year - the protected woodlands attract the threatened gang-gang and glossy black cockatoos, and Capertee Valley is one of only three known nesting areas for the endangered regent honeyeater. You'll find a range of options if you're looking for a place to stay, including Capertee Homestead, Cottage or campground. Bookings essential. You can also hike into remote Policemans Point campground.

    • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
    • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylstone.

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Capertee National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents.

    Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton