White Sands walk and Scribbly Gum track

Jervis Bay National Park

Overview

Starting at Greenfield Beach picnic area, this short walk passes white sandy beaches and coastal forest by the shores of Jervis Bay. Stop for a swim, spot birds and dolphins, or extend your walk to Hyams Beach.

Where
Jervis Bay National Park
Distance
2.5km loop
Time suggested
30min - 1hr 30min
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • Both tracks are easy but you’ll find the Scribbly Gum track steeper with more steps.
  • If you'd like a slightly longer walk, try the path that goes from Chinamans Beach to Cyrus Street, which leads you to nearby Hyams Beach.
  • There's also a council walking track north from Greenfield Beach that goes to Plantation Point via Blenheim Beach, and has several lookouts along the way. It makes a good extension to the national park tracks.

White Sands walk and Scribbly Gum track are interconnected walking tracks which loop through scenic Jervis Bay National Park.

Start White Sands walk at Greenfield Beach picnic area, or if you’d like a longer walk, you can start from Plantation Point to the north. From Greenfield Beach the track heads south along Jervis Bay, passing the white sands and clear water of Chinamans Beach. Remember to bring your swimsuit if you fancy a quick dip along the way.

You’ll be treated to incredible water views at various points along the track, which is a top spot for bird watching and glimpsing dolphins. There are also plenty of scenic detours along the way. From Chinamans Beach, you can walk to Cyrus Street and head through Hyams Beach town to reach its famous beach.

The return leg along Scribbly Gum track takes you away from the coastline, through tall coastal forest and woodland, finishing up at the top of Greenfield Beach picnic area. If you're lucky, you might spy some furry locals including possums and gliders.

Take a virtual tour of White Sands walk and Scribbly Gum track captured with Google Street View Trekker.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/white-sands-walk-and-scribbly-gum-track/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about White Sands walk and Scribbly Gum track.

Track grading

Grade 3

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    30min - 1hr 30min

  • Quality of markings

    Sign posted

  • Gradient

    Short steep hills

  • Distance

    2.5km loop

  • Steps

    Many steps

  • Quality of path

    Formed track

  • Experience required

    No experience required

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    White Sands walk starts at Greenfield Beach picnic area. Pedestrian access to the picnic area opens directly off the cul-de-sac at the end of Elizabeth Drive, Vincentia.

    • From the Princes Highway, take the Jervis Bay Road turn-off and follow signs to Vincentia
    • Follow Elizabeth Drive to the cul-de-sac at its end – there are parking bays along the road

    Park entry points

    Parking

    Parking is available on Elizabeth Drive, a short walk from Greenfield Beach picnic area.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you Jervis Bay National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Spring

    Take advantage of spring weather and head to Hyams Beach. You can pick up some fish and chips from the nearby Hyams Beach Café to enjoy on the white sands of this iconic south coast beach. If you're feeling energetic after lunch, walk the easy Hyams Beach trail.

    Summer

    Swim, surf, snorkel and dive your way through the summer school holidays in this beach paradise.

    Winter

    Humpback whales can be spotted migrating northwards in the winter months. Keep an eye out for southern right whales and dolphins too. They're often seen around the park's coastline.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    17°C and 24°C

    Highest recorded

    40.6°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    10°C and 17°C

    Lowest recorded

    -0.5°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    April, May and June

    Driest month

    September

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    316.7mm

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Beach safety

    Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

    Strong rips and currents may be present at beaches around Jervis Bay National Park – take care in the water and please supervise children at all times.

    Bushwalking safety

    If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Fishing

    Some of the waters around Jervis Bay National Park are protected areas within Jervis Bay Marine Park – fishing is prohibited in some areas. For more information, check the Marine Parks Authority website and the NSW Fisheries website.

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Hyams Beach (16 km)

    Wherever you stay at Hyams Beach, you'll be close to the water. There's a wide range of accommodation styles and budgets on offer from pretty whalers' cottages to glamorous modern homes, seaside cottages and old-style beach houses with modern appliances. Hyams Beach Cafe is stocked with great coffee, freshly-baked sourdough bread from Berry Sourdough Bakery and delicious beach fare.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Nowra (40 km)

    Nowra is a historic city and the commercial heart of the Shoalhaven. It's on the Shoalhaven River close to beaches and national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Ulladulla (63 km)

    Ulladulla is close to several wonderful national parks. Morton National Park, to the west, is home to Pigeon House Mountain, a local landmark which is a popular climb. Murramarang National Park, between Ulladulla and Batemans Bay, has beautiful coastal walks, beaches and camping sites.   

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    White Sands walk and Scribbly Gum track is in Jervis Bay National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Ancient connections

    White Sands walk, Jervis Bay National Park. Photo: Andrew Richards

    Jervis Bay sits within the lands of the South Coast (Yuin) Aboriginal people of the Dharawal-Dhurga language group. Research shows the area has the highest density and most diverse range of archaeological site types anywhere on the south coast, making this precious park an important place for the preservation of Aboriginal sites, like coastal middens, stone artefacts, rock art, and axegrinding grooves.

    • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon. Contact your local national parks office for more information about the updated excursion.
    • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon. Contact your local national parks office for more information about the updated excursion.

    Diverse habitats

    Greenfields Beach, Jervis Bay National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    A walk through the park reveals its varied vegetation – from endangered bangalay sand forests to ubiquitous eucalypt woodlands. In the park’s protected gullies you’ll spot rainforest species like lilly pilly and water vine. And if you stop by Carama Inlet or Moona Moona creek, you’ll see saltmarsh and mangroves. Be ready to spot plenty of wildlife among coastal heathland on the sandstone plateau near Vincentia, as well as unique flora in the park’s northern clay-soiled heath.

    Picture-perfect beaches

    White Sands walk, Jervis Bay National Park. Photo: Andrew Richards

    Arriving in this pristine haven, you could be forgiven for thinking you’re in paradise. The region's crystal clear waters and impossibly white sand are among its biggest drawcards – the sea is ideal for fishing, swimming and snorkelling. Be sure to enjoy a wander along Hyams Beach to experience its icing-sugarsand – it’s said to be the world’s whitest.

    • Coonemia Creek Coonemia Creek in Jervis Bay National Park is a great spot for fishing, kayaking, birdwatching or a picnic.
    • Greenfield Beach picnic area Greenfield Beach picnic area in Jervis Bay National Park is perfect for a barbecue. After a tasty lunch, go for a walk or head down to the beach for a swim or snorkel.

    Protected birds

    White Sands walk and Scribbly Gum track, Jervis Bay National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    This gorgeous landscape is home to several threatened bird species that dependon the park for survival. The chance of seeing these special birds thriving makes the park a must for everyone, not just birdwatchers. Head to Lake Wollumboola to see waders and water birds or visit the heathland areas, which support eastern bristlebirds and ground parrots. You might see glossy black cockatoos among casuarina forest and powerful owls in woodland.

    • Hyams Beach trail Hyams Beach trail, also known as the Bird Spotter’s walk is great for birdwatching in Jervis Bay National Park. Continue the walk to Seamans Beach for a refreshing swim.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Australian pelican. Photo: Rob Cleary

      Australian pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus)

      The curious pelican is Australia’s largest flying bird and has the longest bill of any bird in the world. These Australian birds are found throughout Australian waterways and the pelican uses its throat pouch to trawl for fish. Pelicans breed all year round, congregating in large colonies on secluded beaches and islands.

    • White-bellied sea eagle. Photo: John Turbill

      White-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster)

      White-bellied sea eagles can be easily identified by their white tail and dark grey wings. These raptors are often spotted cruising the coastal breezes throughout Australia, and make for some scenic bird watching. Powerful Australian birds of prey, they are known to mate for life, and return each year to the same nest to breed.

    • Sugar glider. Photo: Jeff Betteridge

      Sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps)

      The sugar glider is a tree-dwelling Australian native marsupial, found in tall eucalypt forests and woodlands along eastern NSW. The nocturnal sugar glider feeds on insects and birds, and satisfies its sweet tooth with nectar and pollens.

    • Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Photo: Peter Sherratt

      Yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

      The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is one of the largest species of parrot. With dusty-black plumage, they have a yellow tail and cheek patch. They’re easily spotted while bird watching, as they feed on seeds in native forests and pine plantations.

    Plants

    •  Black sheoak. Photo: Barry Collier

      Black sheoak (Allocasuarina littoralis)

      The black sheoak is one of a number of casuarina species found across the east coast of Australia and nearby tablelands. Growing to a height of 5-15m, these hardy Australian native plants can survive in poor or sandy soils. The barrel-shaped cone of the black sheoak grows to 10-30mm long.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    School excursions (4)

    Person walking on the beach. Photo:Andy Richards