River walk

Boonoo Boonoo National Park

Affected by closures, check current alerts 

Overview

Using the park’s fire trail system, River walk connects Cypress-pine campground with Boonoo Boonoo Falls picnic area, offering excellent swimming, hiking and picnicking opportunities.

Where
Boonoo Boonoo National Park
Accessibility
No wheelchair access
Distance
6.1km one-way
Time suggested
3hrs 30min - 4hrs 30min
Grade
Grade 3
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Hat, drinking water, sunscreen
Please note
  • The weather in this area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch

In summer, what better place to relax than by a river? River walk, which can be joined at several places along Falls Road, connects Cypress-pine campground and Boonoo Boonoo Falls picnic area. Spring is also a great time along River walk, as the park is a haven for wildflowers including a variety of wattles, pea flowers and rock orchids.

The track takes you through dry eucalypt forest and vegetation in the riparian zone – the interface between the land and the waterway – a little way back from the river. Make the most of the two river visits by having a dip, a swim, or at the very least by splashing someone in your group.

If you’ve approached the river quietly, you may be lucky enough to spot a platypus. Around sunrise and sunset, wallabies and kangaroos might be seen grazing or drinking at the river.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/boonoo-boonoo-river-walk/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about River walk.

Track grading

Grade 3

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    3hrs 30min - 4hrs 30min

  • Quality of markings

    Clearly sign posted

  • Gradient

    Short steep hills

  • Distance

    6.1km one-way

  • Steps

    Occasional steps

  • Quality of path

    Formed track

  • Experience required

    No experience required

Getting there and parking

On entering Boonoo Boonoo National Park, for Cypress-pine campground:

  • Follow Boonoo Boonoo Falls Road and the campground is on the left- hand side and is well-signposted

For Boonoo Boonoo Falls picnic area:

  • Follow the unsealed Boonoo Boonoo Falls Road for 4km to the park entrance
  • Continue for a further 9km to the picnic area

Road quality

Check the weather before you set out as the road to Boonoo Boonoo Falls can become flooded during heavy rains.

Parking

Parking is available at Boonoo Boonoo campground. Bus parking is available.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Boonoo Boonoo National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Spring

This is the season for wildflowers. The mild weather at this time of year is also particularly good for camping.

Summer

The water in the large secluded rock pools along the river will give sweet relief from the summer heat.

Winter

Temperatures can plunge overnight and mornings are often frosty at this time of year, so be well-prepared if you're camping. Though winter days are often sunny, cloudless and warm enough to enjoy a picnic or a long hike.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

14°C and 27°C

Highest recorded

38.3°C

Winter temperature

Average

2°C and 14°C

Lowest recorded

-10°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

January

Driest month

August

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

228.6mm

Facilities

Drinking water is not available in this area, so it’s a good idea to bring your own.

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Accessibility

Disability access level - no wheelchair access

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

River walk is in Boonoo Boonoo National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Fabulous falls

Cypress-pine campground, Boonoo Boonoo National Park. Photo: David Young

The park's jewel is Boonoo Boonoo Falls. If you'd like to see what this feature is really made of, then visit during the wetter months of summer. Even if the falls aren't pumping, though, they're still beautiful and there will always be rock pools along the river to swim in, walking tracks to follow and riverside picnics to indulge in.

Gold fever

Morgans Gully, Boonoo Boonoo National Park. Photo: David Young

Morgans Gully and Ropers Gully are two sites in the park where alluvial gold was discovered in the late nineteenth century. As a result, there was a huge influx of European and Asian prospectors to the area. As well as giving the nearby town of Tenterfield a massive economic boost at the time, the village of Boonoo Boonoo temporarily flourished but is now ruins. Though nature has reclaimed these gullies too, imagine what the areas might have looked, sounded and smelt like when they were teeming with men from here and all over the world, half-crazy with gold fever.

Have you seen the wildlife?

Boonoo Boonoo Falls, Boonoo Boonoo National Park. Photo: David Young

Boonoo Boonoo is an Aboriginal name meaning 'poor country with no animals to provide food'. Since that name came about, before European settlement, the environment has significantly changed. Now kangaroos and wallabies visit Cypress Pine campground and the park's picnic areas at dawn and dusk. The wariest wallaby of them all, the threatened brush-tailed rock wallaby, can even be seen if you're very quiet and patient. Spotted-tailed quolls, also a threatened species, sometimes visit Cypress Pine campground at night and platypuses live and frolic in Boonoo Boonoo River.

  • Boonoo Boonoo Falls picnic area Boonoo Boonoo Falls picnic area is not only a great place to eat and rest, it teems with wildlife, wildflowers and is close to Falls lookout, rock pools and River track.
  • Boonoo Boonoo Falls walking track Boonoo Boonoo Falls walking track allows a short stroll between Boonoo Boonoo picnic area and the scenic lookout onto the magnificent Boonoo Boonoo Falls.
  • Morgans Gully picnic area Visit Morgans Gully for a relaxing picnic, and investigate gold mining historic heritage surrounded by wildflowers and embellished with a waterfall and geological formations.

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