Marramarra Creek campground

Marramarra National Park

Affected by closures, check current alerts 

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Overview

Marramarra Creek campground is near Hornsby and by the tranquil waters of Marramarra Creek. Enjoy canoeing, kayaking, walking, fishing, birdwatching and explore historic orchards.

Accommodation Details
Camping type Tent, Remote/backpack camping
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, toilets
What to bring Drinking water, cooking water, firewood
Price Free. There are no camping fees at this campground but a $6 booking fee applies.
Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • Sites are not marked and are not powered
  • This campground is suitable for groups
  • This is a remote campground, so please make sure you arrive well-prepared.
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Marramarra Creek campground is delightful. Set among the trees and by the tranquil waters of Marramarra Creek, this campground is in the northern outskirts of Sydney.

The beauty of this remote campground is that you can only access it by foot or by water, making it a peaceful retreat away from the crowds. Follow the easy 3.5km walk along Marramarra Ridge trail to the campground. Try your luck fishing in the creek or head off along Marramarra Ridge to Smugglers Ridge walking track to explore. Jump in your canoe or kayak and paddle around the mangroves. Wander off on foot and explore the orange orchards from early European settlers that still exist near the campground.

Lie back and listen to the chorus of birds in the trees above. You might see a majestic wedge-tailed eagle gliding high above. Keep your eyes out for swamp wallabies and bandicoots, then get ready for a peaceful night with a bit of stargazing.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/marramarra-creek-campground/local-alerts

Bookings

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Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Marramarra Creek campground.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Marramarra Creek campground is in the southern precinct of Marramarra National Park. The campground can only be accessed by foot or boat. To get there:

    • From Fiddletown, follow Bloodwood Road until you see the sign to Marramarra Ridge on your left
    • Follow the gravel-surfaced Marramarra Ridge trail to the management trail gate
    • Park your car here and continue along the Marramarra Ridge trail for approximately 3.5km. Note that this trail has several steep sections
    • At the bottom of the last hill, turn left and continue to the main campground, or turn right to the Orchard campground

    Boat access:

    • Access to the campground is via Berowra Creek
    • Take care when heading upstream during low tides, particularly approaching Big Bay and beyond

    Park entry points

    Road quality

    • Unsealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Parking

    Parking is available at the end of Marramarra Ridge trail.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Marramarra National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    Unwind and take in the serenity of camping at Gentlemans Halt or Marramarra Creek campgrounds.

    Spring

    Wander through the bush and enjoy the colourful display of wildflowers.

    Summer

    Paddle the waterways by kayak or canoe and have a swim in the rivers.

    Winter

    Enjoy longer hikes and day walks such as Canoelands Ridge walking track or Marramarra Ridge to Smugglers Ridge walking track.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    19°C and 28°C

    Highest recorded

    44.8°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    6°C and 16°C

    Facilities

    • Water is not available at this campground.
    • Firewood is not provided and may not be collected from the park.
    • Rubbish bins are not available, so please take your rubbish with you when leaving.

    Toilets

    • Composting toilet

    Picnic tables

    Barbecue facilities

    • Fire rings (bring your own firewood)

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Boating safety

    If you're out on your boat fishing, waterskiing or just cruising the waterways, the safety of you and your passengers is paramount.

    Camping safety

    Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

    Fire safety

    During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

    Fishing safety

    Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Paddling safety

    To make your paddling or kayaking adventure safer and more enjoyable, check out these paddling safety tips.

    River and lake safety

    The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Gosford (51 km)

    Gosford is a great destination for a family day trip or holiday. It's situated on Brisbane Water National Park and surrounded by state forests, lakes and beaches.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Hawkesbury area (42 km)

    Explore the beautiful Hawkesbury River with Australia's Last River Boat Postman, or sample fresh oysters at a casual riverside cafe. Start your Hawkesbury adventure with a seaplane flight from Sydney to a local restaurant by the river.

    www.sydney.com

    Parramatta (57 km)

    Parramatta offers a fascinating insight into early colonial life in Australia. Don't miss a visit to Old Government House, now one of 11 Australian Convict Sites on the UNESCO World Heritage list.

    www.sydney.com

    Learn more

    Marramarra Creek campground is in Marramarra National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Darug country

    Sandstone cave, Marramarra National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Marramarra is part of the traditional lands of the Darug Aboriginal people. Their use and respect of the land can be found in isolated corners of the park. The surviving Aboriginal sites, which provide the only indications of traditional life in the area, are of special importance to local Aboriginal communities. Cave art, rock engravings, grinding grooves, middens, scarred trees, and other occupational deposits and stone arrangements are all part of Marramarra. 

    Exploring the land

    View of the Hawkesbury River, Marramarra National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    In the early days of the new colony, Hawkesbury River was a major communication route and supported an active river-based community. European exploration began as early as 1789 when Governor Arthur Phillip took his second trip up Hawkesbury River and camped at Gentlemans Halt. By 1884, there was a small community at Gentlemans Halt and a provisional school had been established; you can still see the foundations of a road and a wharf from this era. Other reminders of European historic heritage include remains of orange orchards along Marramarra Creek and the foundations of a hut, stone walls and a well at Big Bay.

    Is it a bird?

    Flannel flowers (Actinotus helianthi), Marramarra National Park. Photo: Michael Jarman

    Marramarra is home to a great diversity of animals and birds, making it a great place for wildlife spotting and bird watching. You're likely to spot a white-breasted sea eagle, swamp wallaby, possum or kingfisher in your travels. If you're lucky, you might come across some of the more uncommon animals found here such as rails, gang-gang and glossy black cockatoos, and red-crowned toadlets.

    Plentiful lands

    View of the Hawkesbury River, Marramarra National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    The sandstone ridges and deep gullies of Marramarra support a wide range of environments. Experience salt marsh and mangrove forests on the shores of Hawkesbury River, to tall open forest and ridge-top woodlands. In spring, the bush turns into a brilliant display of colour as the wildflowers burst in action. Discover the unique plant life and help preserve it – why not participate in the bush regeneration volunteer programs in the park?

    Education resources (1)