Four Mile Trail campground - Eucumbene River

Selwyn area in Kosciuszko National Park

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Overview

Four Mile Trail campground is located on the Eucumbene River. An ideal base to do some fishing, explore some of the high country and its pioneering heritage. It's away from it all but close to the High Plains area of northern Kosciuszko National Park.

Camp on the crystal clear waters of Eucumbene Rver, surrounded by granite boulders and snowgrass. You can discover stunning sub-alpine landscapes, enjoy wildlife encounters or take a walk along one of the many tracks and trails in northern Kosciuszko National Park.

There’s no winter road access between the June and October long weekends and it is a 2WD, dry weather only access or 4WD wet weather access. Extreme weather conditions can sometimes result in road closures.

There are no toilet, picnic tables or other facilities at this campground.

Bookings are required. Book online or call 1300 072 757.

These maps give a basic overview of park attractions and facilities, and may not be detailed enough for some activities. We recommend that you buy a topographic map before you go exploring.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/four-mile-trail-campground-eucumbene-river/local-alerts

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Park info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Four Mile Trail campground - Eucumbene River.

Learn more

Four Mile Trail campground - Eucumbene River is in Selwyn area. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Kiandra's claims to fame

Kiandra Heritage track, Kosciszko National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer/NSW Government

The discovery of gold at Kiandra in 1859 attracted up to 10,000 prospectors hoping to strike it rich. Just 18 months later, after harsh winters and falling gold finds, only a few hundred gold miners remained. It's remembered as one of Australia’s shortest gold rushes, not to mention it’s highest (and coldest). In 1861, Kiandra became the birthplace of skiing in Australia, when Norwegian gold miners fashioned skis from fence palings. By the 1870s regular ski carnivals were arranged, and Australia had its first official ski slope here. Mining continued into the 1930s, with grazing and winter skiing also keeping the community alive. Before devastating fires in 2019-2020, four buildings still stood here, including Kiandra Courthouse, which had served as a courthouse, private residence, ski chalet, hotel and bar.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Bare-nosed wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

    Bare-nosed wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian bare-nosed wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • A juvenile platypus saved by National Parks and Wildlife staff. Photo: M Bannerman/OEH

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

    One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

Plants

  • Billy Button flowers at Peery Lake picnic area. Photo: Dinitee Haskard OEH

    Billy buttons (Craspedia spp. )

    Billy buttons are attractive Australian native plants that are widespread throughout eastern NSW in dry forest, grassland and alpine regions such as Kosciuszko National Park. The golden-yellow globe-shaped flowers are also known as woollyheads. Related to the daisy, billy buttons are an erect herb growing to a height of 50cm.

Environments in this area