Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve

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Overview

Next to Batemans Bay , Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve offers scenic views of the surrounding area and islands, as well as picnic spots, birdwatching, and easy walks.

Read more about Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve

Batemans Bay is beautiful, but it also has a hidden trump card up its sleeve; Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve. Sugar gliders slip between the trees, echidnas forage in the undergrowth, oystercatchers and soldier crabs stalk across the sand, and black swans frolic in the bay.

Visitors will find the activities just as rich as the wildlife, with plenty to keep you returning. Pack a picnic, grab a towel, and head to the secluded beach, or pull on your walking shoes for a short hike to a scenic lookout, with Snapper Island and the Tollgates in clear sight. There’s canoeing and kayaking too, and even fishing in certain areas.

Pack some binoculars for some stellar birdwatching: the southern emu wren is here all year round, but it’s joined by local and migratory birds from everywhere. And budding geologists will be fascinated by the two ‘chenier’ dune formations – the only examples south of North Queensland.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/cullendulla-creek-nature-reserve/local-alerts

Contact

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve.

Map


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Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Batemans Bay to:

    • Square Head: Turn from the Princes Highway into Cullendulla Drive, then into Blairs Road, Long Beach.
    • Cullendulla Beach: Turn from Princes Highway into Peninsula Drive (north Batemans Bay), then into McLeod Street, Timbara Crescrent, and Myamba Parade, Surfside.

    Road quality

    • Sealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    By public transport

    Both parts of Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve are accessible by bus, however a short walk is required from the nearest stop. For information about public transport options, visit the Priors transport info website.

    Best times to visit

    Spring

    Migratory birds arrive from Russia, Asia, northeast China, and Europe for the warmer months, foraging on the sand flats where you can see them from Cullendulla Beach.

    Summer

    Break out the canoe or kayak and beat the summer heat with a refreshing paddle up Cullendulla Creek.

    Winter

    Make the short hike to Square Head to do the Mangrove walk, watching how the landscape changes in high and low tide.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    15.5°C and 23.5°C

    Highest recorded

    43.3°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    6.5°C and 17.2°C

    Lowest recorded

    0°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    August

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    275.3mm

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Batemans Bay (3 km)

    Batemans Bay is a bustling coastal town with majestic seascapes. It's located on the estuary of the Clyde River.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Mogo (12 km)

    In 1857, the discovery of a single nugget sparked a goldrush in the Batemans Bay area that saw the town grow to a population of 10,000 virtually overnight. When the boom was over, Mogo stalled but has been rescued by tourism in recent times thanks to its collection of historic buildings and new attractions.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Moruya (30 km)

    Moruya is a historic dairy town on the Moruya River surrounded by dairy pastures and rugged national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Remarkable dune formations

    Cullendulla Creek Beach, Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve. Photo: Mat Makeham

    The nature reserve contains important and unusual dune formations called cheniers. Roughly parallel to the shoreline, these long, low (3-6m) and narrow ridges overlay estuarine mud and are of great scientific interest for the information they provide about the evolving landscape - some 7000 years worth of changes. There are nine beach ridges at Cullendulla; the most northerly two are cheniers. Though they're not directly visible to visitors, a fascinating boardwalk tracks through the mangrove estuary, accompanied by signs which offer a keen insight into the local ecosystem. For the best overview, visit in both high and low tide and compare the differences.

    • Mangrove walk An easy walk offering great birdwatching opportunities, Mangrove walk is partly along an elevated boardwalk, giving an insight into the unusual dune formations.

    Birdwatchers' haven

    Mangrove walk, Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve. Photo: Mat Makeham

    Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve is home to mangrove estuary (and two mangrove species, the grey and river mangroves), forest red gums, littoral rainforest, and sea grass beds. The reserve is also a fish nursery for the Clyde River. Unsurprisingly then, a substantial mix of forest and shorebirds visit the area annually, including white ibises, curlews, two species of spoonbill and several of duck. Migratory birds come from as far away as Russia, taking refuge in the warm weather.

    • Cullendulla Beach track A secluded stretch of sand in the protected waters of Batemans Bay, Cullendulla Beach offers terrific swimming, birding and a great place to launch a canoe up the creek.
    • Square Head track 1 This short walk offers rich rewards, leading to the entrance of Cullendulla Creek, perfect for an afternoon picnic and swim near the shorebirds.

    Aboriginal culture

    Cullendulla Creek, Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve. Photo: Mat Makeham

    Cullendulla Creek holds several ancient Aboriginal midden sites, including rarely recorded mounded midden sites. The Mangrove walk is a great way to engage with the past lives of people here, weaving through areas where mud oysters, mussels and shellfish were once collected.

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Cullendulla Creek Nature Reserve has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents.