Monument Beach picnic area

Conjola National Park

Overview

Set in a forest behind the beach, Monument Beach picnic area is a quiet base from which to take a short walk and learn about the history of the area.

Type
Picnic areas
Where
Conjola National Park
Price
Free
Opening times

Monument Beach picnic area is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch.

One of the most serene areas of Conjola is Monument Beach picnic area. Set behind the beach, this is the ultimate spot for families. You can walk along the isolated beach, clamber over the small headlands, throw in a fishing line, go for a paddle or surf, take a short bushwalk, or head to the monument that remembers the lives lost when the Walter Hood sank in 1870.

As you drive in, stop to admire the beautiful flowering natives, including waratahs, wattles and bush peas. And don’t be surprised if the only other living creatures around are the resident kangaroos and wallabies.

Set out along Nerindillah Lagoon walking track after lunch, and while you’re walking along the beach, look for sooty oystercatchers, sea eagles and the hooded plover, which is only found on the NSW south coast.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/picnic-areas/monument-beach-picnic-area/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about the Monument Beach picnic area.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Monument Beach picnic area is near Bendalong in Conjola National Park. To get there:

    • Turn east onto Bendalong Road from the Princes Highway then left into Cedar Road
    • Follow the signs along Cedar Road and Walter Hood Access Road, which ends at a short access road to the picnic area.
    • There is 7km of unsealed road before you reach the picnic area

    Park entry points

    Road quality

    • Unsealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Weather restrictions

    • Dry weather only

    Parking

    Parking is available at Monument Beach picnic area.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Conjola National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    As the temperature cools slightly, this a great time to get active in the park with some bushwalking and mountain biking.

    Spring

    The wildflowers – waratahs and wattle among them – are in full bloom, bringing with them large numbers of birds. You might even be lucky enough to spot the rare Scalet Honeyeater or Little Lorikeet.

    Summer

    Hot weather means plenty of time for the beach and water. Keep an eye open for the endangered hooded plover and other shorebirds foraging on the sand.

    Winter

    The light is clear and beautiful and the beaches and trails very quiet – just the thing if you prefer exploring with few other people around.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    19°C and 24°C

    Highest recorded

    40.6°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    10°C and 18°C

    Lowest recorded

    -3.2°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    May

    Driest month

    September

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    316.7mm

    Facilities

    You'll need to bring your own drinking water.

    Toilets

    • Non-flush toilets

    Picnic tables

    Carpark

    Drinking water

    Tank Water. Please boil before drinking

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Beach safety

    Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

    Fishing safety

    Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Permitted

    Fishing

    A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Lake Conjola (5 km)

    Lake Conjola is a deep coastal lake regularly open to the sea which provides a wonderful playground for fishing and boating enthusiasts.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Nowra (36 km)

    Nowra is a historic city and the commercial heart of the Shoalhaven. It's on the Shoalhaven River close to beaches and national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Ulladulla (14 km)

    Ulladulla is close to several wonderful national parks. Morton National Park, to the west, is home to Pigeon House Mountain, a local landmark which is a popular climb. Murramarang National Park, between Ulladulla and Batemans Bay, has beautiful coastal walks, beaches and camping sites.   

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Monument Beach picnic area is in Conjola National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Aboriginal influence

    Swan Lake, Conjola National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    The land around Conjola National Park has been home for the Budawang and Yuin people for about 6000 years. There are many Aboriginal sites in the area, including middens, campsites and rock shelters. At Fishermans Rock, the midden contains fragments of mussels and mud oysters that were once meals for the local Aboriginal people. You'll also see some axe-grinding grooves in the sandstone.

    • Berrara Creek Popular with families, Berrara Creek becomes a beautiful lagoon that leads to the beach. Put your canoe in and paddle upstream, go swimming or fishing.

    Animal planet

    Banksia (Banksia ericifolia) Conjola National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    With open forests and scrubland, there are plenty of places to find Conjola's wildlife. Keep your eyes peeled for eastern grey kangaroos, wombats, echidnas, brushtail possums and gliders, along with a huge range of cockatoos and parrots, black swans and herons. As well as providing the perfect place for swimming, canoeing, fishing and water sports, the three lakes adjacent to the park - Conjola, Berringer and Swan - are a significant habitat for many birds, such as little terns, the endangered hooded plover and pied oystercatchers.

    • Berrara Creek Popular with families, Berrara Creek becomes a beautiful lagoon that leads to the beach. Put your canoe in and paddle upstream, go swimming or fishing.
    • Heath Circuit Get close to nature on Heath Circuit, a 24km loop bike ride along signposted trails.

    Driving force

    Couple walking on Monument Beach, Conjola National Park. Photo: Michael Jarman

    You can easily explore Conjola from the comfort of your car. Some of the tracks and trails that take you through forests, past the lakes and to the ocean are even accessible for 2WD vehicles in dry weather. One of the most popular drives is from Cudmirrah to Monument Beach picnic ground, following Goonawarra Drive, Blackbutt Road and Cedar Road. Just take care as you're driving along, because you'll be sharing the trails with cyclists, walkers and horse-riders as well as wildlife, which also cross the tracks mainly in the early morning and late afternoon.

    • Berrara Creek Popular with families, Berrara Creek becomes a beautiful lagoon that leads to the beach. Put your canoe in and paddle upstream, go swimming or fishing.
    • Monument Beach picnic area Set in a forest behind the beach, Monument Beach picnic area is a quiet base from which to take a short walk and learn about the history of the area.

    Maritime monument

    Monument Beach ride from Bendalong, Conjola National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    In 1870, 12 men lost their lives when the clipper Walter Hood struck rocks off the coast between Bendalong and Berrara. A monument, erected in 1927, marks the burial site of the drowned captain and crew. it is a short walk from the Monument Beach picnic area.

    • Monument Beach picnic area Set in a forest behind the beach, Monument Beach picnic area is a quiet base from which to take a short walk and learn about the history of the area.
    • Nerindillah Lagoon walking track The short and easy Nerindillah Lagoon walking track takes in Monument Beach, historic heritage including the Walter Hood monument, and is great for birdwatching.

    Education resources (1)

    Monument beach, Conjola National Park