Policemans Point campground

Capertee National Park

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Policemans Point campground, in Capertee National Park, is a great place for setting up a bush campsite with nearby swimming, walking, cycling and birdwatching opportunities.

Accommodation Details
Camping type Tent, Remote/backpack camping
What to bring Cooking water, drinking water, fuel stove
Price Free. There are no camping fees at this campground but a $6 booking fee applies.
Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • There are no marked sites
  • The weather in the area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
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Most things in life are far more satisfying when you have to work for them, so make your way to Policemans Point campground – accessible only by hiking or mountain biking. Be rewarded for your efforts with a peaceful campsite on the banks of the beautiful Capertee River, where there are no vehicles or generators to be heard, just the sounds of the natural environment. Go for a swim if the weather’s warm and the river’s running. Explore the area further by heading off for a riverside walk.

Bring your binoculars for birdwatching and keep an eye out too for wallabies and wombats. At dusk and dawn, you’re likely to see more wildlife.

This campground is suitable for anyone willing to leave the car behind and ‘go bush’. It’s also an ideal place to try bush camping for the first time, as you can park as close as 1km away.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/policemans-point-campground/local-alerts

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Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Policemans Point campground.

Getting there and parking

Policemans Point campground is in the southern precinct of Capertee National Park. To get there:

  • Follow Port Macquarie Road to the locked gate at the park boundary (the access code can be obtained from Mudgee office). Once within the park, leave your vehicle on Carinya trail.
  • Walk or cycle from Carinya trail along Policemans track for 1km, or walk or cycle from Carinya trail along Oaky Creek trail for 2.5km.

Road quality

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • No vehicle access

Parking

Parking is available on Carinya trail, which are both walking or cycling distance from Policemans Point campground.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Capertee National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

The cooler autumn months are an excellent time for walking and mountain biking the trails and tracks within the park.

Spring

Grab your binoculars for some superb birdwatching. You might catch a rare glimpse of the endangered regent honeyeater as it builds its nest.

Summer

Enjoy a relaxing picnic on the shady banks of Capertee River, a refreshing swim and perhaps some fishing.

Winter

Enjoy a car tour of Capertee while taking in nearby Wollemi and Goulburn River National Parks.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

12.1°C and 25.5°C

Highest recorded

38.4°C

Winter temperature

Average

10.4°C and 0.7°C

Lowest recorded

-8°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

January

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

179mm

Facilities

  • Water is not available at this campground.
  • You’re encouraged to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during the fire season.

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

This is a remote campground, so please make sure you arrive well-prepared.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Permitted

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Bathurst (25 km)

Within a 70-km radius of Bathurst are the spectacular limestone cave systems -Abercrombie and Jenolan caves - which you can explore safely on guided tours.

www.visitnsw.com

Kandos (6 km)

Kandos is a gateway to the wonderland of Wollemi National Park, the rugged home of one of the rarest plants in the world - the Wollemi Pine - and other endangered and threatened species of plants, marsupials and birds. It's a great base for bushwalking, water sports and enjoying the great outdoors.

www.visitnsw.com

Lithgow (25 km)

Hassans Walls Lookout, near Lithgow, is the highest in the Blue Mountains. Admire Mt Wilson, Mt York, Mt Tarana and Mt Blaxland as well as the pretty Hartley Valley below. To the south are the Kanimbla and Megalong valley and Mt Bindo. While there, go for a walk or ride around the lookout.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Policemans Point campground is in Capertee National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Looking for things to do in Capertee?

Policeman's Point campground, Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

There are great things to do when in Capertee. Enjoy fantastic bird watching any time of the year - the protected woodlands attract the threatened gang-gang and glossy black cockatoos, and Capertee Valley is one of only three known nesting areas for the endangered regent honeyeater. You'll find a range of options if you're looking for a place to stay, including Capertee Homestead, Cottage or campground. Bookings essential. You can also hike into remote Policemans Point campground.

  • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
  • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylstone.

Plant life abounds

Eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

The park is home to rare grey grevillea shrubs, which bloom with pink and red flowers in spring. This hardy, dense shrub is found nowhere else but Capertee Valley. Fertile river flats and surrounding slopes host an ecological community of majestic yellow box, blakelys red gum and white box, providing a vital habitat for wildlife and native birds.

  • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
  • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylstone.

Wiradjuri country

Looking over the escarpment in Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

Capertee National Park is within the traditional lands of Wiradjuri People. The surrounding countryside contains evidence of Aboriginal occupation in the form of rock art, scarred trees and artefacts. Traditional food plants and old travel routes are also present within the park.

Education resources (1)

Policemans Point campground, Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton