Kookibitta campground

Kwiambal National Park

Overview

Kookibitta campground offers grassy sites by the tranquil Severn River in Kwiambal National Park. Enjoy remote bush camping, cool off in a swimming hole, explore riverside walking tracks, and admire the wildflowers and wildlife.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 6
Camping type Tent, Caravan site, Camper trailer site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, carpark, toilets
What to bring Cooking water, drinking water, firewood, sturdy shoes
Price

$6 per adult per night. $3.50 per child per night.

Bookings Bookings are not required for this campground. Camping is on a first in, first served basis.
Please note
  • Sites are unmarked and unpowered.
  • There are 6 campsites next to picnic tables, with additional tent camping available near the river.
  • This campground is popular during Easter. You can also camp at nearby Lemon Tree Flat campground.
  • This is a remote campground, so please make sure you arrive well prepared.
  • Please wear appropriate walking shoes, as tiger pear cactus grows in this area. If you step on the cactus it can be quite painful.

If you’re looking for a peaceful riverside setting, set up camp at Kookibitta campground in Kwiambal National Park. You can pitch your tent beside one of the picnic tables on the grassy terrace, or closer to the river for an authentic bush camping experience.

Junction walk is a relaxing bushwalk that starts at the campground. It follows the Severn River past picnic areas and small beaches to the junction with the McIntyre River. Enjoy swimming and fishing, then continue to Dungeon lookout, where you’ll have views over the steep river gorge and canopy of white cypress pines.

After lunch, grab your binoculars and go birdwatching. You’ll see speckled warblers and thornbills by the river, as well the stunning turquoise feathers of the sacred kingfisher. At dusk, brush tailed possums and squirrel gliders dart among the river oaks. If you’re lucky, you’ll spot a small southern boobook owl perched on nearby branch.

If you don’t like the heat, make sure you visit in the cooler months. There’s little shade at the campground and summer temperatures can reach 40°C. The campground is positioned well to enjoy the winter sunshine. From September to March, wildflowers bloom in the surrounding woodlands.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/kookibitta-campground/local-alerts

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Kookibitta campground.

Getting there and parking

Kookibitta campground is in the northern area of Kwiambal National Park. To get there:

From Ashford:

  • Take Wallangra Road northwest then turn right onto Sandy Creek Road
  • Turn left onto Limestone Road and continue into Kwiambal National Park
  • Turn left onto McIntyre Falls Road then right onto Lemon Tree Flat Road
  • Turn right at the Kookibitta campground sign and continue to the campground.

Road quality

Check the weather and road conditions before setting out. The road to this campground can become boggy when it rains.

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • 4WD required in wet weather

Parking

Parking is available at Kookibitta campground.

Facilities

  • Water is not available at this campground.
  • Rubbish bins are not available, so please take your rubbish with you when you leave.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

This campground has a large camp kitchen shelter with gas/electric barbecues.

  • Fire rings (bring your own firewood)
  • Gas/electric barbecues (free)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Keep well back from cliff edges and waterfalls at all times, especially when taking photos. Read our waterfall safety tips.

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Please wear appropriate walking shoes, as tiger pear cactus grows in this area. If you step on the cactus it can be quite painful.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Strong rips and currents may be present in the rivers, so take care in the water and please supervise children at all times.

Accessibility

Disability access level - hard

Wheelchairs can access this area with some difficulty.

Permitted

Camp fires and solid fuel burners

Cycling

Cycling is permitted on roads. You can’t ride on walking tracks, including Junction track.

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Prohibited

Recreational hunting in NSW National Parks is an illegal activity and is a fineable offence.

Gathering firewood

Generators

Horses

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

Kookibitta campground is in Kwiambal National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Aboriginal cultural heritage

Macintyre Falls, Kwiambal National Park. Photo: Michael van Ewijk

Kwiambal takes its name from the aboriginal people of the Ashford district. Rich in food, water and materials, the area provided a year-round living environment for their ancestors, with sacred sites and hunting grounds spread throughout the park.

Animals

Eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), Kwiambal National Park. Photo: Michael van Ewijk

There are five rare or threatened plant species in the park: severn wattle, Rodd’s star hair, caustic vine, daisy bush and toadflax. Feel free to look, but please be careful not to damage the plants. In the warmer months of September to March, the wildflowers bloom throughout the bush. Like its flowers, Kwiambal is home to dozens of notable animal species, including 32 types of reptile, 11 frogs, and 30 species of mammal. Some 18 species are threatened or endangered, including koalas, squirrel gliders, and five-clawed worm skinks. There are also an astonishing 101 types of bird, making the park a hot spot for avid birders. Keep an eye out for painted honeyeaters, barking owls, hooded robins, and diamond firetails.

  • Dungeon lookout Where Severn River enters a steep gorge, you’ll find The Dungeon, with this lookout offering superb views down into the swell, particularly after rain.
  • Limestone Caves walking track Limestone Caves walking track is a short, easy walk in Kwiambal National Park, near Ashford. It’s popular with families keen to explore the caves, spot the local bats, and enjoy a picnic or natural swim spot.
  • Macintyre Falls lookout Adjacent to a well-equipped picnic area, Macintyre Falls lookout offers scenic views over the river, with nearby swimming, hiking and fishing opportunities.
  • Slippery Rock walking track Slippery Rock walking track in Kwiambal National Park, near Inverell, offers spectacular gorge views as well as fishing, birdwatching and vibrant wildflowers in spring.

Historic heritage

Macintyre River, Kwiambal National Park. Photo: OEH

The flat areas of the park have been subjected to farming of tobacco, giving way to cereal crops and the mining of various minerals and sapphires. Unsurprisingly then, there are a number of historical landmarks within the park, including tobacco-drying sheds, woolsheds, fruit trees, storage sheds, and the remains of a house. History enthusiasts will want to seek these out on a visit.

Native rainforest

Slippery Rock walking track, Kwiambal National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

Kwiambal contains 15 per cent of the native dry rainforest left in NSW. The vegetation is dominated by white cypress pines, silver-leaved ironbarks, and tumbledown gums. Unfortunately, much of the planning area has been subjected to logging in the past, though considerable regeneration makes it a worthy destination for nature-lovers. 

  • Dungeon lookout Where Severn River enters a steep gorge, you’ll find The Dungeon, with this lookout offering superb views down into the swell, particularly after rain.
  • Junction walk Junction walk offers a stroll through ironbarks and pine trees to the meeting of Severn and Macintyre rivers, with swimming, picnicking, and birdwatching opportunities.
  • Limestone Caves walking track Limestone Caves walking track is a short, easy walk in Kwiambal National Park, near Ashford. It’s popular with families keen to explore the caves, spot the local bats, and enjoy a picnic or natural swim spot.
  • Macintyre Falls lookout Adjacent to a well-equipped picnic area, Macintyre Falls lookout offers scenic views over the river, with nearby swimming, hiking and fishing opportunities.
  • Slippery Rock walking track Slippery Rock walking track in Kwiambal National Park, near Inverell, offers spectacular gorge views as well as fishing, birdwatching and vibrant wildflowers in spring.

Education resources (1)

Macintyre Falls, Kwiambal National Park. Photo: Michael van Ewijk/NSW Government