Capertee campground

Capertee National Park

Affected by closures, check current alerts 

Overview

Capertee campground in Capertee National Park is a great place to set up a campsite and do some birdwatching or walking.

Accommodation Details
Camping type Tent, Caravan site, Camper trailer site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, toilets
What to bring Drinking water, cooking water, food supplies, firewood, fuel stove
Price
  • Rates and availability are displayed when making an online booking
  • A minimum daily rate applies, which includes the first 2 occupants
Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • Check in 12pm. Check out 12pm.
  • Campsites are unmarked with no power
  • The campground has a maximum capacity of 50 and is suitable for group bookings 
  • There is limited mobile reception in this park

Looking for somewhere to park the camper trailer for a few days or set up a tent for a night or two? Capertee campground is a great spot for your campsite and, with campfires permitted in fireplaces, is just as suitable for winter camping as it is for summer.

When Capertee River is running, enjoy a refreshing paddle on a warm day or a walk along its banks. If you’re keen on birdwatching, take along your binoculars to get a closer look at woodland birds as black cockatoos screech overhead as though vying for your attention. The area is also ideal for hiking and cycling.

Capertee campground lies just to the north of the historic Capertee Homestead and Capertee Woolshed ruins

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/capertee-campground/local-alerts

Bookings

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Capertee campground.

Getting there and parking

Capertee campground is in the northern part of Capertee National Park. To get there:

  • Turn on to Port Macquarie Road (unsealed) from Glen Alice Road
  • From the locked gate on the park boundary, follow Port Macquarie Road for 5km
  • Upon arriving at Capertee River causeway, cross the river and take the road on the right to the campground     

Important: Follow the instructions and the map provided by NPWS. Don't use Google maps or GPS as this will give you an incorrect route and you may not be able to access the campground.

After booking you'll get a code to open the park boundary gate. Contact 1300 072 757 if you have not received your code.

Road quality

Check the weather before you set out as the road to Capertee campground may be flooded after heavy rain.

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Capertee National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

The cooler autumn months are an excellent time for walking and mountain biking the trails and tracks within the park.

Spring

Grab your binoculars for some superb birdwatching. You might catch a rare glimpse of the endangered regent honeyeater as it builds its nest.

Summer

Enjoy a relaxing picnic on the shady banks of Capertee River, or a refreshing paddle.

Winter

Enjoy a car tour of Capertee while taking in nearby Wollemi and Goulburn River National Parks.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

12.1°C and 25.5°C

Highest recorded

38.4°C

Winter temperature

Average

10.4°C and 0.7°C

Lowest recorded

-8°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

January

Driest month

September

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

179mm

Facilities

  • There are no showers in the campground
  • Water is not available at this campground.
  • You’re encouraged to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during the fire season.
  • Rubbish bins are not available, so please take rubbish with you when leaving.
  • The campground is in a remote location, so it’s a good idea to pick up your supplies before you arrive. The nearest town is Rylstone, approximately 45 mins drive.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Fire rings (bring your own firewood)

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Bushwalking safety

The walking opportunities in this park are suitable for experienced bushwalkers. Check out our bushwalking safety tips.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Accessibility

Disability access level - hard

Wheelchairs can access this area with some difficulty. The campground is uneven in places.

Permitted

Chemical toilets are permitted, however dumping of waste in NPWS facilities is not permitted.

Prohibited

Amplified music is not permitted in Capertee campground

Generators

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Learn more

Capertee campground is in Capertee National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Looking for things to do in Capertee?

Policeman's Point campground, Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

There are great things to do when in Capertee. Enjoy fantastic bird watching any time of the year - the protected woodlands attract the threatened gang-gang and glossy black cockatoos, and Capertee Valley is one of only three known nesting areas for the endangered regent honeyeater. You'll find a range of options if you're looking for a place to stay, including Capertee Homestead, Cottage or campground. Bookings essential. You can also hike into remote Policemans Point campground.

  • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
  • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylstone.

Plant life abounds

Eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

The park is home to rare grey grevillea shrubs, which bloom with pink and red flowers in spring. This hardy, dense shrub is found nowhere else but Capertee Valley. Fertile river flats and surrounding slopes host an ecological community of majestic yellow box, blakelys red gum and white box, providing a vital habitat for wildlife and native birds.

  • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
  • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylstone.

Wiradjuri country

Looking over the escarpment in Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

Capertee National Park is within the traditional lands of Wiradjuri People. The surrounding countryside contains evidence of Aboriginal occupation in the form of rock art, scarred trees and artefacts. Traditional food plants and old travel routes are also present within the park.

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