Junction walk

Kwiambal National Park

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Overview

Junction walk offers a stroll through ironbarks and pine trees to the meeting of Severn and Macintyre rivers, with swimming, picnicking, and birdwatching opportunities.

Where
Kwiambal National Park
Distance
7km return
Time suggested
1hr 30min - 2hrs 30min
Grade
Grade 4
Price
Free
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen, suitable clothing
Please note
The weather in this area can be extremely cold during winter and unpredictable. Please ensure you’re well-prepared, bring appropriate clothing and equipment and advise a family member or friend of your travel plans.

Junction walk leaves from Lemon Tree Flat campground, making it a convenient opportunity to strike out into the white cypress pines for a relaxing day walk. Bring your camera, swimmers and a packed lunch – there are good picnic spots along the way, and the walk approaches small beaches ideal for a summer dip.

The main destination is the junction of Severn and Macintyre River. There’s also The Dungeon, a deep river gorge that becomes a churning tunnel of water after rainfall. It can be seen safely from a rocky outcrop above the river, and a one-kilometre sidetrack takes you to the top of the gorge for an even more scenic Dungeon lookout. Be sure to wear sturdy shoes.

At first glance, you won’t see too many animals in the area beyond wild goats hopping up the rocky ravines. Look closer though: in the right season there are desert tree frogs, geckos and monitors, turquoise parrots, squirrel gliders and possums. The area is also well-suited to birdwatching.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/junction-walk/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Junction walk.

Track grading

Grade 4

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    1hr 30min - 2hrs 30min

  • Quality of markings

    Sign posted

  • Gradient

    Short steep hills

  • Distance

    7km return

  • Steps

    Occasional steps

  • Quality of path

    Rough track, many obstacles

  • Experience required

    No experience required

Getting there and parking

Junction walk starts at Lemon Tree Flat campground in the northern precinct of Kwiambal National Park. To get there:

  • From Ashford, take Wallangra Road north west
  • Turn right onto Sandy Creek Road
  • Then left onto Limestone Road and continue into Kwiambal National Park.
  • Turn left onto Macintyre Falls Road
  • Turn right onto Lemon Tree Flat Road and follow the signs to the campground
  • Junction walk begins at the northern end of Lemon Tree Flat along the old 4WD track

Alternatively:

  • Travel along Inverell Street in Ashford and turn onto Limestone Road.
  • At the intersection of Limestone Road and Sandy Creek Road turn right, and continue into Kwiambal National Park.

Parking

Parking is available at Lemon Tree Flat campground

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Kwiambal National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Spring

Between the warmer months of September and March, spectacular wildflower displays decorate the bush beneath white cypress pines.

Summer

The many swimming opportunities, including rivers, secluded beaches, and even a plunge pool, makes Kwiambal a terrific destination in the height of summer.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

16.9°C and 30.6°C

Highest recorded

41.2°C

Winter temperature

Average

2.7°C and 18°C

Lowest recorded

-6.3°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

January

Driest month

June

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

160mm

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

  • If you’re bushwalking in this park, it’s a good idea to bring a topographic map and compass, or a GPS.
  • The walking opportunities in this park are suitable for experienced bushwalkers who are comfortable undertaking self-reliant hiking

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Glen Innes (21 km)

Set in the most prolific sapphire region of Country NSW, Glen Innes hosts the annual Minerama Fossicking and Gem Show and the annual Australian Celtic Festival, and is home to the Australian Standing Stones.

www.visitnsw.com

Inverell (20 km)

Go fossicking for sapphires and other gems at several places around the city. Grab a map of local fossicking sites from the visitor information centre and try your luck.

www.visitnsw.com

Warialda (5 km)

Warialda is surrounded by picturesque bushland, making it an ideal location for bushwalking and relaxing in natural surrounds. There are numerous places to picnic, and Cranky Rock Nature Reserve is a popular spot for fossicking, birdwatching and exploring. The area also supports a large variety of wildflowers.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Junction walk is in Kwiambal National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Aboriginal cultural heritage

Macintyre Falls, Kwiambal National Park. Photo: Michael van Ewijk

Kwiambal takes its name from the aboriginal people of the Ashford district. Rich in food, water and materials, the area provided a year-round living environment for their ancestors, with sacred sites and hunting grounds spread throughout the park.

Animals

Eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), Kwiambal National Park. Photo: Michael van Ewijk

There are five rare or threatened plant species in the park: severn wattle, Rodd’s star hair, caustic vine, daisy bush and toadflax. Feel free to look, but please be careful not to damage the plants. In the warmer months of September to March, the wildflowers bloom throughout the bush. Like its flowers, Kwiambal is home to dozens of notable animal species, including 32 types of reptile, 11 frogs, and 30 species of mammal. Some 18 species are threatened or endangered, including koalas, squirrel gliders, and five-clawed worm skinks. There are also an astonishing 101 types of bird, making the park a hot spot for avid birders. Keep an eye out for painted honeyeaters, barking owls, hooded robins, and diamond firetails.

  • Dungeon lookout Where Severn River enters a steep gorge, you’ll find The Dungeon, with this lookout offering superb views down into the swell, particularly after rain.
  • Limestone Caves walking track Limestone Caves walking track is a short, easy walk in Kwiambal National Park, near Ashford. It’s popular with families keen to explore the caves, spot the local bats and enjoy a picnic.
  • Macintyre Falls lookout Adjacent to a well-equipped picnic area, Macintyre Falls lookout offers scenic views over the river, with nearby swimming, hiking and fishing opportunities.
  • Slippery Rock walking track Slippery Rock walking track in Kwiambal National Park, near Inverell, offers spectacular gorge views as well as fishing, birdwatching and vibrant wildflowers in spring.

Historic heritage

Macintyre River, Kwiambal National Park. Photo: OEH

The flat areas of the park have been subjected to farming of tobacco, giving way to cereal crops and the mining of various minerals and sapphires. Unsurprisingly then, there are a number of historical landmarks within the park, including tobacco-drying sheds, woolsheds, fruit trees, storage sheds, and the remains of a house. History enthusiasts will want to seek these out on a visit.

Native rainforest

Slippery Rock walking track, Kwiambal National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

Kwiambal contains 15 per cent of the native dry rainforest left in NSW. The vegetation is dominated by white cypress pines, silver-leaved ironbarks, and tumbledown gums. Unfortunately, much of the planning area has been subjected to logging in the past, though considerable regeneration makes it a worthy destination for nature-lovers. 

  • Dungeon lookout Where Severn River enters a steep gorge, you’ll find The Dungeon, with this lookout offering superb views down into the swell, particularly after rain.
  • Junction walk Junction walk offers a stroll through ironbarks and pine trees to the meeting of Severn and Macintyre rivers, with swimming, picnicking, and birdwatching opportunities.
  • Limestone Caves walking track Limestone Caves walking track is a short, easy walk in Kwiambal National Park, near Ashford. It’s popular with families keen to explore the caves, spot the local bats and enjoy a picnic.
  • Macintyre Falls lookout Adjacent to a well-equipped picnic area, Macintyre Falls lookout offers scenic views over the river, with nearby swimming, hiking and fishing opportunities.
  • Slippery Rock walking track Slippery Rock walking track in Kwiambal National Park, near Inverell, offers spectacular gorge views as well as fishing, birdwatching and vibrant wildflowers in spring.

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