Eualdrie walking track

Weddin Mountains National Park

Overview

Eualdrie walking track is a short hiking route that offers scenic views, birdwatching and spring wildflowers.

Where
Weddin Mountains National Park
Distance
4.8km return
Time suggested
2hrs 30min - 3hrs 30min
Grade
Grade 4
Price
Free
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go birdwatching
  • If you’re bushwalking in this park, it’s a good idea to bring a topographic map and compass, or a GPS.
  • The walking opportunities in this park are suitable for experienced bushwalkers who are comfortable undertaking self-reliant hiking
  • There is limited mobile reception in this park
  • Toilets can be found at Ben Halls campground and Holy Camp

Situated in Weddin Mountains National Park, near Cowra, Eualdrie walking track follows an old logging trail from Holy Camp. From the base of the mountain you’ll climb steeply to Peregrine lookout, where you can look across to the township of Grenfell. As you ascend, enjoy the constantly changing views of the sandstone escarpments and surrounding farmland.

This moderate track, with short steep sections, winds through heath and woodlands dominated by mugga ironbark, black cypress pine, dwyers red gum, and red stringybark. In spring it’s the wildflowers of daphne heath, pink five-corners, wattles and grevillea you’re most likely to see in bloom.

Wallabies will often be standing quietly on this track blending into the surrounding woodlands of ironbark, black cypress pine and stringybark. You might only notice them when they suddenly dart off through the bush.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/eualdrie-walking-track/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Eualdrie walking track.

Track grading

Grade 4

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    2hrs 30min - 3hrs 30min

  • Quality of markings

    Limited signage

  • Gradient

    Short steep hills

  • Distance

    4.8km return

  • Steps

    Occasional steps

  • Quality of path

    Rough track, many obstacles

  • Experience required

    Some bushwalking experience recommended

Getting there and parking

Eualdrie walking track is on the eastern side of Weddin Mountains National Park. To get there:

  • Travel 1.5km south from Grenfell along Mary Gilmore Way
  • Turn west onto Holy Camp Road and carry on for 14km where the road terminates within the park at Holy Camp
  • The walking track starts from this campground

Parking

  • Parking is available at Holy Camp
  • Bus parking is available

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Weddin Mountains National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

Cooler days make it an ideal time to undertake some of the longer walks. It's also a good time to wander around Seaton's Farm to investigate and compare machinery used back then to what we have today.

Spring

A great time to see the wildflowers that blanket much of the ground. Venture up to the lookouts to see the sprawling surrounding farming country.

Summer

Enjoy a free barbecue at Ben Hall's campground.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

30°C and 33°C

Highest recorded

43.9°C

Winter temperature

Average

12°C and 15°C

Lowest recorded

-5°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

June

Driest month

February

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

110.7mm

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Outback safety

Safety is of high priority in outback areas. In summer, temperatures can reach up to 50°C in some places. Food, water and fuel supplies can be scarce. Before you head off, check for road closures and use our contacts to stay safe in the outback.

Permitted

Camp fires and solid fuel burners

  • You’re encouraged to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during the fire season.

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Forbes (51 km)

Rich in gold-mining history and the site of the biggest gold robbery in Australia's history, Forbes is renowned for its connections with notorious bushrangers Ben Hall and Frank Gardiner. Find out more on the town's heritage trail.

www.visitnsw.com

Grenfell (16 km)

The historic goldmining town of Grenfell is the birthplace of poet Henry Lawson, who was born on 17 June, 1867.  Bushranger Ben Hall was also born nearby. Hall and his gang rampaged through the area from late 1863 until his death in a hail of bullets in May 1865.Visit the Grenfell Historical Museum to learn about Grenfell and its famous and (infamous) sons.

www.visitnsw.com

Young (51 km)

Young is home to many different stone-fruit orchards, wineries and gourmet food shops. Pick your own cherries from November to December and explore the local cellars and restaurants.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Eualdrie walking track is in Weddin Mountains National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Any way you like it

Ben Halls campground, Weddin Mountains National Park. Photo: M Cooper

The park offers both relaxing and adventurous recreational opportunities. Picnickers can enjoy a campfire and barbecue at Ben Hall's campground, while more adventurous visitors can walk the mountain range on a variety of walking tracks.

Protected population

Basin Gully wildflowers, Weddin Mountains National Park. Photo: C Davis

The Weddin Mountains harbour 12 threatened plant species and 39 threatened bird species. In spring, many lilies and orchids come into bloom, as do winged peppercress and slender darling pea. The diversity in vegetation from the base of the mountain to the top also accommodates a variety of bird species, from larger emus to smaller robins and thornbills. Raptors such as wedge-tailed eagles and peregrine falcons are often seen swooping and diving from the lookouts.

  • Bertha's Gully walking track This medium difficulty walk near Grenfell passes small waterfalls and rock overhangs along Bertha’s Gully. Stop by at the campground for a rest after your 6km walk.
  • Eualdrie walking track Eualdrie walking track is a short hiking route that offers scenic views, birdwatching and spring wildflowers.
  • Lynchs loop trail Lynchs loop trail is a short hike within Weddin Mountains National Park. The route is scenic and there are birdwatching opportunities.

Rock stars

Eualdrie lookout, Weddin Mountains National Park. Photo: OEH

The Weddin Mountains are a large, crescent-shaped range that rises sharply from the surrounding plains. This prominent feature can be seen from up to 50km away. There are a number of interesting rock formations, cliff lines and small caves, particularly on the northern and eastern side of the mountain. Deep gullies between gentler slopes produce some lovely small waterfalls after a good rain.

  • Basin Gully to Eualdrie lookout track Enjoy a challenging walk? Highlights on this fantastic hiking track include ridges, gullies and scenic views that stretch toward Grenfell, as well as great birdwatching.

Where there's a will

Seatons Farm historic site, Weddin Mountains National Park. Photo: Claire Davis

In 1936, the Seaton family began developing property on the western side of the Weddin Mountains as a pastoral enterprise. Money and resources were scarce during the Great Depression, so the farm was built using second-hand materials fashioned into solid structures. Seaton's Farm is a testimony to the ingenuity used by the Seatons when times were tough. It provides brilliant insight into how this farming family lived during the mid-1900s. The Weddin Mountains are also well-known as the hideout of bushrangers Ben Hall and John Bow, infamously involved in the Escort Robbery at Eugowra.

  • Seaton's Farm historic site An easy scenic walk to a perfect picnic spot against a backdrop of historic agricultural relics. Binoculars are also a must for the enthusiastic birdwatcher.

Education resources (1)

Eualdrie walking track, Weddin Mountains National Park. Photo: C Davis