Moore Park picnic area

Moore Park Nature Reserve

Overview

Moore Park picnic area offers basic facilities for a leisurely lunch, with terrific opportunities for birdwatching and viewing the large flying fox population.

Type
Picnic areas
Where
Moore Park Nature Reserve
Accessibility
Medium
Price
Free
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • Please avoid any disturbance to the flying fox camp while it’s occupied
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go bird watching

Moore Park picnic area, at the north end of Moore Park Reserve, is the best place to start any visit to the area. Pack a barbecue lunch and settle down around some tables in the cool shade of the rainforest.

Moore Park Nature Reserve is the largest and best remaining example of lowland subtropical rainforest in the entire state, with 127 native plant species showing what the region looked like before widespread logging across the NSW Northern Rivers region in the last century. This makes it a superb place to escape from the hustle and bustle of modern life to the tranquil solitude of nature.

The picnic area is surrounded by beautiful scenery at the junction of Findon Creek and Richmond River. You might notice the high ridges of McPherson Range and Border Ranges National Park. Richmond Range begins to rise to the west and south.

Birdwatchers in particular will find much to occupy their attention here. Rainforest pigeons are often seen in the area, as well as black bitterns, bush hens, and the rose-crowned fruit dove. The grey-headed flying fox dominates the reserve for up to eight months a year. Massing together, they make a dramatic spectacle, but be careful not to disturb their camp when it’s occupied.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/picnic-areas/moore-park-picnic-area/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about the Moore Park picnic area.

Getting there and parking

Moore Park picnic area is at the northern end of Moore Park Nature Reserve. To get there:

  • From Summerland Way at Old Grevillia, travel 1.1km along Findon Creek Road.
  • The picnic area is located on the right, immediately before the first bridge over Richmond River.

Road quality

  • Sealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available at Moore Park picnic area.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you at Moore Park Nature Reserve. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

The ripening figs attract numbers of rainforest pigeons.

Spring

The silky oaks are in bloom, their gold flowers brightening the forest.

Summer

More than 10,000 flying foxes use the reserve as a maternity ward. Please ensure you do not disturb them.

Winter

Frosts and fogs hug the forest in the early morning, but once they lift the days are glorious.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

Summer temperature

Average

16°C and 29°C

Highest recorded

42.9°C

Winter temperature

Average

4°C and 20°C

Lowest recorded

-1.4°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

February

Driest month

August

The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

210mm

Facilities

  • You'll need to bring your own drinking and cooking water
  • You’re encouraged to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during the fire season.

Amenities

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Accessibility

Disability access level - medium

  • Assistance may be required to access this area

Prohibited

Gathering firewood

Firewood is not supplied and may not be collected from the reserve.

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Casino (46 km)

Casino is a thriving rural centre in the heart of rich agricultural country. It's set in lush pastures on the banks of the Richmond River.

www.visitnsw.com

Kyogle (22 km)

Kyogle is an attractive timber-milling town surrounded by rainforest. It's set on the Richmond River at the base of Fairy Mountain.

www.visitnsw.com

Murwillumbah (53 km)

Murwillumbah is rich dairy, sugar cane and banana country. It's located on the banks of the Tweed River and set in the Tweed River Valley against a backdrop of rainforest-clad hills.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Moore Park picnic area is in Moore Park Nature Reserve. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

First inhabitants

Moore Park Nature Reserve. Photo: Stephen King/OEH

This region of northern NSW is the home of the Githabul Aboriginal people, for whom the rainforest was an extremely important source of food. There are several known sacred sites in the Northern Rivers area.

Flying high

Grey headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), Moore Park Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH

Moore Park Nature Reserve is also a well-known birdwatching area, with species including the tiny varied sittella (also called nuthatches), rose-crowned fruit dove, the barred cuckoo-shrike and the ground-dwelling bush hen. The reserve is also an essential habitat for winged mammals, with both grey-headed flying foxes and endangered black flying foxes raising their young in a canopy nursery from October to May.

  • Moore Park picnic area Moore Park picnic area offers basic facilities for a leisurely lunch, with terrific opportunities for birdwatching and viewing the large flying fox population.

Fragile forest

Moore Park Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH

Much of the landscape around here would have resembled that of Moore Park Nature Reserve before extensive logging and clearing took place during the 20th century. Now, this 14-hectare reserve represents one of the last remnants of the once much-larger Boyd's Scrub, the most important example of black bean rainforest in the state. Robert J Moore, who was the Kyogle Shire Council president from 1920 to 1936, played a leading role in the council's purchase of what remained of Boyd's Scrub and the reserve is now named in his honour. 

  • Moore Park picnic area Moore Park picnic area offers basic facilities for a leisurely lunch, with terrific opportunities for birdwatching and viewing the large flying fox population.

Meeting spot

Moore Park picnic area, Moore Park Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH

Even before this park was created in 1989, it was an important place for the local community, who have enjoyed its serenity and scenery for decades. Many families would gather here and hold functions in what is now the picnic area beside the Richmond River. The area remains a popular destination for picnics and bird watching.

  • Moore Park picnic area Moore Park picnic area offers basic facilities for a leisurely lunch, with terrific opportunities for birdwatching and viewing the large flying fox population.

Education resources (1)

Moore Park picnic area, Moore Park Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH