Towra Beach

Towra Point Nature Reserve

Open, check current alerts 

Overview

Kurnell’s delightful Towra Beach is ideal for boating, kayaking or a leisurely picnic, all with the Sydney city skyline as your backdrop.

Where
Towra Point Nature Reserve
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • To ensure that this nature reserve is enjoyed for generations to come, please be sure to follow NSW Fisheries advice.
  • Stay within marked areas.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to bird watch.

A honeycomb-coloured stretch of sand surrounding a wildlife reserve, Towra Beach is wonderfully unassuming and a great place to escape from the crowds.

16km south west of Sydney, Towra Beach’s mix of protected wetlands, sand flats and seagrass can only be reached by boat or paddling. More than likely, you’ll enjoy this tranquil beach on your own, so pack a picnic or build a sandcastle by its calm waters. Any visitors will mostly be of the winged kind; rare migrating birds wade the coastline.

Why not visit during summer and stay for sunset? The silhouettes of Captain Cook's and Tom Ugly’s bridges standing tall in the fading orange light is something you’ll remember long after the sun disappears. For another view of the nature reserve stop at Quibray Bay viewing platform on the way home.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Nearby:

  • Quibray Bay viewing platform, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer/NSW Government

    Quibray Bay viewing platform

    Quibray Bay viewing platform in Kurnell is a great place for birdwatching and also features scenic views across conservation areas close to Sydney.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/canoeing-paddling-experiences/towra-beach/local-alerts

Park info

  • in Towra Point Nature Reserve in the Sydney and surrounds region
  • Towra Point Nature Reserve is accessible by boat only. Access to the land is available on special consent for research and educational purposes only. Contact the local Area office on 9668 2000.

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Towra Beach.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Towra Beach is in the northern precinct of Towra Point Nature Reserve. The beach is only accessible by boat. To get there:

    • Follow Captain Cook Drive towards Kurnell
    • At the T intersection turn left towards Botany Bay
    • Turn left again at Prince Charles Parade
    • Continue to the end where Bonna Point boat ramp is on the right
    • From here it’s a short trip across Quibray Bay to Towra Beach

    Park entry points

    Road quality

    • Sealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Weather restrictions

    • All weather

    Parking

    Parking is available at the council managed Bonna Point boat ramp, including several designated trailer parking spots.

    Best times to visit

    Spring

    A variety of birds, including rainbow lorikeet, crimson rosella and Eastern rosella can be seen feeding on purple berries during spring.

    Summer

    Take a picnic and your swimmers to Towra Beach picnic area and cool off during the hot summer months.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    25°C and 27°C

    Highest recorded

    43.4°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    16°C and 21°C

    Lowest recorded

    0.1°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    September

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    216.2mm

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Beach safety

    Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

    Boating safety

    If you're out on your boat fishing, waterskiing or just cruising the waterways, the safety of you and your passengers is paramount.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Paddling safety

    To make your paddling or kayaking adventure safer and more enjoyable, check out these paddling safety tips.

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Learn more

    Towra Beach is in Towra Point Nature Reserve. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    A bird watching haven

    Water hole, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

    Some of the birds that feed on the intertidal flats around Towra Point migrate over 12,000km, coming from as far away as Siberia, China and Japan. Nearly all the migratory birds here are wading birds or shorebirds. You may spot a royal spoonbill or a Pacific golden plover when you visit the reserve; this is a great place for birdwatching and nature photography. Nearly all of the migratory birds that have used the Towra Point area are wading birds or shorebirds. Approximately 34 of the 80 species of migratory birds listed for protection have been recorded as using the Towra Point wetlands.

    • Quibray Bay viewing platform Quibray Bay viewing platform in Kurnell is a great place for birdwatching and also features scenic views across conservation areas close to Sydney.

    Aboriginal country

    Quibrary Bay viewing platform, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

    The beautiful coastal landscape of Towra Point is country for various Dharawal, Dharug and Eora nations. It has provided an abundant source of natural food, being especially rich in seafood and fresh drinking water, for thousands of years. This nature reserve is now a dedicated Aboriginal Place, in recognition of the natural and spiritual significance to this remarkable civilisation. Aboriginal sites, including middens and earth mounds, are all a part of Towra’s fascinating historic landscape.

    Captain Cook’s landing

    Towra Beach, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

    The site of one of the first contacts between European and Aboriginal peoples, Towra Point is a hugely important place for Australia as we know it today. In April 1770, the Cook expedition explored the area and mapped Towra Lagoon as a source of fresh water. Botany Bay was also the site of some of Australia's first botanical collections by Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander; much of what they saw can still be seen here today.

    Sights to behold

    Quibrary Bay viewing platform, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

    Boating and kayaking through the maze of waterways is a great way to see Towra Point Nature Reserve. Be sure to stay within sanctuary and refuge zones to help preserve this outstanding environment. Towra Beach picnic area is a popular destination in summer with boaties, who are tempted by the views stretching from Botany Bay to Sans Souci.

    • Quibray Bay viewing platform Quibray Bay viewing platform in Kurnell is a great place for birdwatching and also features scenic views across conservation areas close to Sydney.
    • Towra Beach Kurnell’s delightful Towra Beach is ideal for boating, kayaking or a leisurely picnic, all with the Sydney city skyline as your backdrop.

    Education resources (1)

    School excursions (1)