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Woolpack Rocks

Cathedral Rock National Park

Overview

Starting from Native Dog campground, follow this track to Woolpack Rocks, where you can picnic, birdwatch and walk to the summit for views across the New England Tablelands.

Where
Cathedral Rock National Park
Distance
8km return
Time suggested
2hrs 30min - 3hrs 30min
Grade
Grade 4
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • The weather in this area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
  • There is limited mobile reception in this park.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch

Woolpack Rocks shouldn’t be overlooked just because the national park wasn’t named after them. Easily accessible from Native Dog campground, this feature is a geological wonder in its own right.

As you walk towards the Woolpack Rocks, their size and shape capture your gaze. You can tell they’re ancient – in fact, they’re around 270 million years old. You can also see some of the dykes created at the same time when molten rock pushed into deep pockets within the earth’s crust; you’re walking along a timeline.

The well-weathered boulders are 1400m above sea level, yet clambering to the summit is even easier than at Cathedral Rock. So, you’re getting a great scenic view for the price of a prehistoric walk and an easy climb.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

See more visitor info
Woolpacks rock vista, Cathedral Rock National Park