Yondeo trail

Wallarah National Park

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Overview

A scenic walk or cycle on Yondeo trail in Wallarah National Park with places to picnic, birdwatching and whale watching opportunities and fishing at Pinny Beach.

Where
Wallarah National Park in North Coast
Distance
2.5km return
Time suggested
1hr 30min - 2hrs 30min
Grade
Grade 4
Trip Intention Form

It's a good idea to let someone know where you're going. Fill in a trip intention form to send important details about your trip to your emergency contact.

What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • There is limited mobile reception in this park.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to bird watch or whale watch.

Yondeo trail is a great way to access and explore Wallarah National Park, and a fun route to the coast and Pinny Beach. This walking and cycling track passes through peaceful, shady bushland where a canopy of eucalypts and cabbage-tree palms will keep you almost as cool as the swim you can have at the end. Wildflowers decorate the area in spring, including the purple bloom of the happy wanderer and the delicate flowers of the fairy orchid. Take along binoculars for birdwatching and whale watching and have a picnic lunch with a view.

Access to Yondeo trail is just off the highway, so, even if you’re only passing the area, why not park the car, stretch your legs and allow the kids to let off steam on this fairly short hike or bike ride? Yondeo trail leads to Scenic trail, also great for hiking and biking, and Coastal walking track.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/yondeo-trail/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Yondeo trail.

Track grading

Grade 4

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    1hr 30min - 2hrs 30min

  • Quality of markings

    Limited signage

  • Gradient

    Short steep hills

  • Distance

    2.5km return

  • Steps

    Occasional steps

  • Quality of path

    Formed track, some obstacles

  • Experience required

    Some bushwalking experience recommended

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Yondeo trail is in the eastern precinct of Wallarah National Park. To get there, park on the eastern side of the Pacific Highway near disused Mine Camp Road and look for signs to the trackhead.

    Parking

    Parking is available on Pacific Highway, a short walk from Mine Camp Road.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Wallarah National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Spring

    Wildflower viewing in the heath along the Coastal walking track.

    Winter

    Whale watching from the beach and coastal tracks.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    17°C and 24°C

    Highest recorded

    42.4°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    10°C and 18°C

    Lowest recorded

    3.4°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    February

    Driest month

    August

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    246mm

    Facilities

    Drinking water is not available in this area, so it’s a good idea to bring your own.

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Beach safety

    Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

    Bushwalking safety

    If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

    Cycling safety

    Hundreds of cyclists head to our national parks for fun and adventure. If you're riding your bike through a national park, read these mountain biking and cycling safety tips.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Permitted

    Fishing

    Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Learn more

    Yondeo trail is in Wallarah National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Don't just stand there

    Pinny Beach, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

    Do you like to surf, or are you more into fishing? Are you the type who loves to hike, or do you prefer cycling? Are you an ocean-gazer or a forest-walker? Wallarah allows you to do any or all of these activities, so bring your gear and enjoy this natural playground.

    • Coastal walking track The Coastal walking track links Caves Beach with the headland just south of Pinny Beach, giving spectacular views over the coastline and ocean along the way.
    • Scenic trail Scenic trail is a challenging mountain bike ride - a steep scenic hike through coastal forest and heathland to views of the rugged coastline and access to Pinny Beach.
    • Yondeo trail A scenic walk or cycle on Yondeo trail in Wallarah National Park with places to picnic, birdwatching and whale watching opportunities and fishing at Pinny Beach.

    Happy wandering

    Pinny Beach, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

    There are various vegetation communities in Wallarah, including heathland, spotted gum and ironbark forest, open smooth-barked apple forest and palm gully rainforest with a canopy dominated by cabbage-tree palm. Follow the various walking tracks through the park to experience these. Keep an eye out for blooming wattle and the intriguing scribbly gum, whose attractive artwork is, in fact, the tunnelling journey of scribbly gum moth's larvae. By the way, the purple-flowered vine you'll see growing throughout the park is known commonly as happy wanderer.

    • Coastal walking track The Coastal walking track links Caves Beach with the headland just south of Pinny Beach, giving spectacular views over the coastline and ocean along the way.
    • Guided coastal hikes from Caves Beach Join CoastXP on a guided hike along the rugged coastline of Lake Macquarie in Wallarah National Park. Explore the Aboriginal culture, geology and plants and animals of this area with your expert guides.
    • Scenic trail Scenic trail is a challenging mountain bike ride - a steep scenic hike through coastal forest and heathland to views of the rugged coastline and access to Pinny Beach.
    • Yondeo trail A scenic walk or cycle on Yondeo trail in Wallarah National Park with places to picnic, birdwatching and whale watching opportunities and fishing at Pinny Beach.

    Living Aboriginal culture

    Pinny Beach, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

    Bahtabah Local Aboriginal Land Council represents the Aboriginal community in the area that is now covered by Wallarah National Park. Physical evidence of Aboriginal people's lives in the area has remained in the form of middens found just south of Swansea. Only a few middens have been recorded, though it is probable that sand mining along this coast over the years has destroyed a large portion of middens that were there prior to European settlement.

    Wild and free

    Yondeo trail, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

    Wallarah has an awesome collection of birds and animals due to the diversity of vegetation and habitats in the park. During the day, look out for sea eagles soaring along the coast, honeyeaters in the springtime flowering heath, lizards lolling on warm boulders, pods of dolphins in the ocean and passing whales during the winter months. At night, you may see the predatory powerful owl, a microbat, or the threatened squirrel glider that glides for up to 50m between trees. Bring along your binoculars to get a closer look at these natural beauties.

    • Coastal walking track The Coastal walking track links Caves Beach with the headland just south of Pinny Beach, giving spectacular views over the coastline and ocean along the way.

    Education resources (1)