Bellamy fire trail

Berowra Valley National Park

Overview

Bellamy fire trail is a northern Sydney secret. This short walk through Berowra Valley Regional Park connects Pennant Hills and Thornleigh along a dog-friendly bushland trail.

Where
Berowra Valley National Park
Accessibility
Medium
Distance
0.6km one-way
Time suggested
30 - 45min
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
Opening times

The Bellamy fire trail is open from sunrise to sunset and may be closed at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

What to
bring
Sunscreen, hat, drinking water

This short walk through Berowra Valley Regional Park is perfect for a city breather. Berowra Valley Regional Park is right next door to Berowra Valley National Park. A level path takes you down to Zig-Zag Creek, over a bridge and up to the high walls and towering forest of the old railway quarry, an attractive natural amphitheatre of sandstone.

You’ll see fern trees, grass trees, coachwood and a variety of tall eucalypts while hearing the joyful call of kookaburras. Interpretive signs tell the history of the historic Zig-Zag railway that used to pass through here. Take a seat on the old railway sleepers and enjoy the peace and beauty of the bush before returning the way you came.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/bellamy-fire-trail/local-alerts

Park info

  • in Berowra Valley National Park in the Sydney and surrounds region
    • Berowra Valley National Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger
    • Crosslands Reserve is open 8am to 7.30pm during daylight savings and 9am to 5pm the rest of the year
    • Barnetts Road Reserve and the lookout is closed from sunset to sunrise
See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Bellamy fire trail.

Track grading

Grade 3

Learn more about the grading system Features of this track
  • Time

    30 - 45min

  • Quality of markings

    Sign posted

  • Gradient

    Short steep hills

  • Distance

    0.6km one-way

  • Steps

    Occasional steps

  • Quality of path

    Well-formed track

  • Experience required

    No experience required

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Bellamy fire trail is in the regional park precinct of Berowra Valley National Park. To get there:

    • From the M2 motorway, take the Pennant Hills Road exit and head north.
    • Turn left at Observatory Park to stay on Pennant Hills Road
    • Turn left onto Boundary Road in Pennant Hills
    • Turn right onto Bellamy Street and follow all the way to the end of the road, where the track begins.

    From Thornleigh:

    • You can join Bellamy fire trail from De Saxe Close, which leads off the intersection of Quarter Sessions Road and Giblett Avenue, Thornleigh.

    Park entry points

    Parking

    Parking is available for the Bellamy fire trail at the end of Bellamy Street, Pennant Hills, and on De Saxe Close, Thornleigh.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Berowra Valley National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Spring

    Enjoy the spring wildflowers and take on the challenge of the Great North walk before the weather gets too warm

    Summer

    Swim in Berowra creek in the warmer months - remember safety precautions around waterways

    Winter

    Winter is generally great for bushwalking in the Sydney region but bring warm gear if you're camping - nights can be cold in the bush

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    18°C and 28°C

    Highest recorded

    43.1°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    6°C and 18°C

    Lowest recorded

    -3.5°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    July

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    253mm

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Bushwalking safety

    If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

    Accessibility

    Disability access level - medium

    • The walking track follows a concrete path through bushland, between Bellamy Street, Pennant Hills and De Saxe Close, Thornleigh.
    • The path is suitable for wheelchairs, prams, and visitors with limited mobility, for the first 300m. From here, there's a short steep hill after the bridge crossing Zig Zag Creek, which requires assistance. There's a handrail on 1 side of the hill.
    • Assistance may be required to pass through the bollards at either end of this walking track.
    • There's a picnic table near the Bellamy Street end of the walk and low, log seating in the amphitheatre, around half way.

    Medium access presents some minor difficulties, such as a grassy surface. You may require a little assistance to get around in some areas.

    Permitted

    Pets

    You can walk your dog at this location. See other regional parks in NSW that have dog walking areas.

    • On-leash dog walking is permitted along the Bellamy fire trail as it traverses the adjacent park, Berowra Valley Regional Park. Dogs need to be kept on a leash at all times, and please remember to pick up after them. Dog walking is permitted on Bellamy Fire trail, but not on Benowie walking track or Jungo walk.

    Prohibited

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Hornsby (4 km)

    A suburb in Sydney's upper north shore, Hornsby is conveniently located for easy access to Lane Cove National Park, Berowra Valley Regional Park, and the heritage-listed Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park - Australia's second-oldest national park. Explore walking and cycling tracks and Aboriginal sites, as well as marinas, cafes and picnic areas.

    www.hornsby.nsw.gov.au

    Parramatta (10 km)

    Parramatta offers a fascinating insight into early colonial life in Australia. Don't miss a visit to Old Government House, now one of 11 Australian Convict Sites on the UNESCO World Heritage list.

    www.sydney.com

    Sydney City Centre (20 km)

    No trip to Sydney is complete without spending some time in the city’s beautiful parks. Whether it’s in central areas like Hyde Park or the Royal Botanic Gardens or further out in Centennial Parklands, there’s plenty of green space to go out and enjoy.

    www.sydney.com

    Learn more

    Bellamy fire trail is in Berowra Valley National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Aboriginal importance

    Barnetts lookout, Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    Berowra Valley National Park is within the traditional Country of the Guringai People to the east of Berowra Creek and the Dharug People to the west. It contains a number of significant Aboriginal heritage sites, including artefacts, middens and campfire sites. This special area, with its land and waterways, plants and animals, features in all facets of Aboriginal culture and continues to be of great significance to Aboriginal people today.

    Bush in the 'burbs

    Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

    Eucalypt forests, delightful birdlife and all manner of creatures occupy this very beautiful bush valley stretching from the suburbs out towards the Hawkesbury river. While you're in the park, keep your eye out for a powerful owl, sea eagle, wedgetail, or listen for the call of a red crown toadlet.

    Making tracks

    Great North walk, Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

    Great North walk is an iconic track that stretches 250km from Sydney to Newcastle. Constructed in 1988 as part of the Australian Bicentenary, the walk takes in diverse landscapes and a lot of Australian history. Part of the walk travels through Berowra Valley National Park along the Benowie walking track.

    • Bellamy fire trail Bellamy fire trail is a northern Sydney secret. This short walk through Berowra Valley Regional Park connects Pennant Hills and Thornleigh along a dog-friendly bushland trail.

    Wonderful waterways

    Barnetts lookout, Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    Berowra Creek is a hidden waterway perfect for canoeing, boating and fishing. Escape the noise and traffic of the city and come and while away a few hours in the perfect serenity of this lovely little spot. Load up your pack with sandwiches and hats and take the family for a wander along the trails or laze under a tree at Crosslands Reserve while the kids play.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Grey headed flying fox hanging from a tree branch. Photo: Shane Ruming/OEH

      Grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)

      The grey-headed flying fox is one of several threatened Australian animals and the largest Australian native bat, with a wingspan that extends up to 1m. Known to inhabit woodlands, rainforests and urban regions, these fascinating nocturnal mammals congregate in large roost sites along the east coast of NSW.

    • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

      Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

      Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

    •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

      With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

    • Swamp wallaby in Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

      The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

    Plants

    • Old man banksia, Moreton National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

      Old man banksia (Banksia serrata)

      Hardy Australian native plants, old man banksias can be found along the coast, and in the dry sclerophyll forests and sandstone mountain ranges of NSW. With roughened bark and gnarled limbs, they produce a distinctive cylindrical yellow-green banksia flower which blossoms from summer to early autumn.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    Looking along the Bellamy Fire Trail. Photo: John Yurasek