Wallagoot Lake picnic area and boat ramp

Bournda National Park

Overview

Wallagoot Lake in Bournda National Park is a playground for watersport enthusiasts and nature lovers. Enjoy sailing, paddling, fishing and birdwatching.

Type
Picnic areas
Where
Bournda National Park
Accessibility
Medium
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Sunscreen, hat, drinking water

Set up a picnic on the shores of the lake while the kids swim in the protected waters. Launch your vessel from the boat ramp and enjoy waterskiing on the glassy waters, or explore the lake on your sail board or paddle ski.

Wallagoot Lake’s unique aquatic environment is home to a huge diversity of marine life, making it a popular destination for children eager to learn about the ecosystem.

This distinctive waterway also offers excellent fishing and birdwatching. As well as several species of waterfowl, look out for threatened species like the little tern and fairy tern nesting on the foreshores during spring or foraging during summer.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/picnic-areas/wallagoot-lake-picnic-area-and-boat-ramp/local-alerts

General enquiries

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about the Wallagoot Lake picnic area and boat ramp.

Getting there and parking

Wallagoot Lake is in the northern precinct of Bournda National Park. To get there:

  • Travel along Sapphire Coast Drive from either Tathra, Bega or Merimbula.
  • Take the Wallagoot Lake Road 
  • Travel 4km along sealed and unsealed road till you reach the boat club and access to the lake

Road quality

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Paid parking is available. Please note that it can be a busy place on the weekend, so parking might be limited.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Bournda National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

As the weather cools but the waters are still warm, it's a great time to enjoy the Kangarutha walking track. Swim along the way at secluded beaches. It will feel like you have the place to yourself.

Spring

Enjoy the colours of wildflowers and the take in the smells of spring as the park comes alive. Head to the lookout at North Tura, find a sunny spot and look out for whales passing in the distance.

Summer

Discover the water activities on offer. Paddling at Bournda Lagoon, sailing on Wallagoot Lake, fishing at Wine Glass Bay or surfing and swimming at any one of the secluded beaches.

Facilities

  • Drinking water is not available in this area, so it’s a good idea to bring your own.
  • Firewood is not supplied and may not be collected from the park
  • You’re encouraged to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during the fire season.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Boating safety

If you're out on your boat fishing, waterskiing or just cruising the waterways, the safety of you and your passengers is paramount.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Paddling safety

To make your paddling or kayaking adventure safer and more enjoyable, check out these paddling safety tips.

Accessibility

Disability access level - medium

Assistance may be required to access this area

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Bega (41 km)

With its forests, lush pastures and a coastline sculpted into a succession of wonders by the sea, the Sapphire Coast is a perfect holiday destination at any time of the year. Set in a valley at the junction of the Bega and Brogo rivers and surrounded by rich dairy country, Bega is a handsome, historic town that's the rural centre of the Sapphire Coast and gateway to the lush Bega Valley. Visit the Bega Cheese Heritage Centre, housed in a faithful reproduction of the original, tells the story of cheese-making production in the area.

www.visitnsw.com

Merimbula (24 km)

The main coastal towns of the Sapphire Coast include Bermagui, Tathra, Merimbula and Eden. This stunning coastline has sparkling beaches and bays, lakes and national parks, all accessible via excellent walking tracks and coastal drives. You'll find beaches just perfect for surfing, swimming and walks.

www.visitnsw.com

Tathra (4 km)

Tathra is a small coastal township clustered around a historic sea wharf, a popular fishing platform and the only one of its kind remaining on the east coast of Australia.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Wallagoot Lake picnic area and boat ramp is in Bournda National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Birdwatchers haven

Wallagoot Lake, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

With around 200 species of birds in the area, Bournda is a birdwatcher's paradise. The estuarine wetlands at the eastern end of Wallagoot Lake provide roosting and feeding areas for a large variety of waders and waterfowl. Keep your eyes out for threatened species like the little tern, hooded plover and pied oystercatcher. Bondi Lake is the largest freshwater lake situated behind coastal dunes in the region, and is another important habitat for waterbirds.

  • Bournda Lagoon Bournda Lagoon is an ideal spot within Bournda National Park, near North Tura, where kids can swim, fish and go paddling and picnic among the paper barks.
  • Kangarutha walking track Kangarutha walking track, in Bournda National Park, is a hiking route with scenic coastal views and birdwatching, picnicking and swimming opportunities along the way.
  • Sandy Creek loop track Taking in Bournda Lagoon, Sandy Creek and pockets of dry sclerophyll forest, Sandy Creek loop track is a hike in Bournda National Park on the far South Coast.

Get active

Kianinny Bay picnic area, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

With so much to do, there's no excuse not to get active in Bournda. The beaches and waterways offer a range of options for watersport enthusiasts - waterskiing, boating, paddling, sail boarding, fishing, swimming and surfing. The coastal walk is perfect for hikers and those hoping to spot migrating whales. And for cyclists, the roads throughout the park are an extensive network to navigate on your bike.

Ships ahoy

Kianinny Bay picnic area, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

There's plenty of fascinating heritage in Bournda, dating back to the 1830s when European settlement of the district began. Today, you can still see anchor bolts at Kangarutha Point, which was established as a port with Kianinny Bay in 1859. It's also believed the existing track to the point, and parts of the coastal walk, were once used to supply ships anchored there, and transport produce and passengers. Some building remains can also be found around Games Bay, which was cleared for dairy farming by settler Mr Games.

The land of generations

Turingal Head, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Bournda has been a special place for the Dhurga and Yuin people for thousands of years, with its plentiful food supply and quarry for making tools. As you explore the park and its wildlife, it'll be no surprise that 'Bournda' means 'place of tea tree and kangaroos'.

Education resources (1)

Bournda National Park. Photo: A Brown/NSW Government