Sculptures in the Scrub picnic area and campground

Pilliga National Park

Overview

Camp for free at Sculptures in the Scrub picnic area and campground in Timmallallie National Park. Enjoy the Pilliga Forest and take the short walk to the sculptures and enjoy a barbecue lunch or dinner.

Accommodation Details
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Caravan site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, carpark, toilets
What to bring Food supplies, drinking water, cooking water
Price Free.
Bookings Bookings are not required at this campground. Campsites are available on a first-in first-served basis.
Please note
  • There are no marked sites.
  • Sculpture in the Scrub walking track is in a remote outback location but the 3km return track is well-marked.
  • We recommend dropping into Pilliga Forest Discovery Centre to pick up a detailed map of the area before setting out.
  • This campground is in a remote location. Bring extra supplies in case of breakdown or changes in weather that may affect road access.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch.

Deep in vast Pilliga Forest lies exquisite Dandry Gorge and the magnificent Sculptures in the Scrub. This once secret location of the Aboriginal Gamilaroi People is now an extraordinary place for all to share. Visit the sculptures to see five unique art pieces which reveal the cultural history of Pilliga.

Sculptures in the Scrub picnic area and campground in Timmallallie National Park is a great place to base yourself while exploring Timmallallie.

Whether you’re parking the caravan, pulling a camper trailer or pitching a tent, this roomy camping spot has space for them all. Set up your campsite and step out on the renowned Sculpture in the Scrub walking track. It’s also a great spot for a delicious lunch before or after a stroll around the art.

While you might glimpse a glossy black cockatoo or the elusive turquoise parrot, grey kangaroos, red-necked wallabies and lace monitors are often spotted along the walk. As the shadows grow long, settle in for a famous outback sunset and cook up a barbecue feast and wait for the overwhelming display of stars.

Before you head out though, get the low down on where to go at the award winning Pilliga Forest Discovery Centre, in Baradine.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/sculptures-in-the-scrub-picnic-area-and-campground/local-alerts

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about the Sculptures in the Scrub picnic area and campground.

Getting there and parking

Sculpture in the Scrub campground is in Timmallallie National Park. To get there from Barradine:

  • Follow Sculpture signage when leaving Baradine
  • Drive along Indians Lane for approximately 9.5km
  • Turn right at the T junction onto No 1 Break Road and drive for about 13km
  • Turn right onto Top Crossing Road and drive for approximately 11km
  • Turn left into Dandry Gorge Road and drive for 1km, following the signs to Sculpture in the Scrub campground.

Road quality

Check the weather before you set out as the road to Sculpture in the Scrub walking track can become impassable in heavy rain.

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • Dry weather only

Parking

Parking is available at Sculptures in the Scrub picnic area and campground.

Weather, temperature and rainfall

You may experience a great range of temperatures on any day in the park. In summer it's generally hot in the daytime and temperatures often exceed 40C. In winter nights can be very cold, but you can enjoy clear sunny days. Rainfall is also highly variable, ranging from drought to prolonged wet periods, with the average annual rainfall around 600mm. Creeks may quickly become impassable after heavy rain.

Summer temperature

Average

15°C and 35°C

Highest recorded

45°C

Winter temperature

Average

2°C and 21°C

Lowest recorded

-6.1°C

Rainfall

Wettest month

January

Driest month

June to September

Facilities

Untreated rainwater is available at this picnic area, however it is advisable to boil it before drinking.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Gas/electric barbecues (free)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

If you’re bushwalking in this park it’s a good idea to bring a topographic map and compass, or a GPS.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Navigational systems may not work in this park.

Accessibility

Disability access level - medium

Assistance may be required to access the picnic area.

  • The toilet is wheelchair accessible
  • The walking track is not wheelchair accessible

Permitted

Generators

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Visitor centre

Nearby towns

Coonabarabran (28 km)

Coonabarabran is the closest town to the craggy peaks and spires of the Warrumbungle Ranges. Warrumbungle National Park is popular for bushwalking, camping and encountering wildlife amid breathtaking scenery.

www.visitnsw.com

Coonamble (86 km)

Coonamble is a delightful country town, the gateway to the wetlands of the Macquarie Marshes and the rugged scenery of Warrumbungle National Park. Nearby are opal fields to the north, and the Pilliga State Forest, with its stands of eucalypts.

www.visitnsw.com

Narrabri (86 km)

Explore Pilliga Forest to see salt caves, native flora and fauna, and bore baths, or enjoy camping and bushwalking in Mt Kaputar National Park. Mt Kaputar's summit offers magnificent panoramic views, and there's excellent cabin accommodation within the park.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Sculptures in the Scrub picnic area and campground is in Pilliga National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A bird watcher’s paradise

Pilliga Forest Discovery Centre, Pilliga Nature Reserve. Photo: Rob Cleary

Pilliga Forest is a mixture of eastern and western climates, making it very attractive to birds – more than 230 species have been recorded. You’re bound to see some of that range during your time at the park, and if you keep a close eye out and bring some binoculars, you’re definitely see even more. Pilliga is one of the few places left in NSW where you can catch sight of the grey-crowned babbler. It’s a bird that lives in family groups and roost together in domed nests of sticks. Other birds you may see include glossy black cockatoos, brown treecreepers, regent honeyeaters, barking owls, and red-capped robins. For more information about great bird watching opportunities in Pilliga, be sure to pick up a copy of Bird Routes of Baradine from Pilliga Forest Discovery Centre.

  • Pilliga Forest Discovery Centre The Pilliga Forest Discovery Centre is the best place for visitors and tourists to collect information about the Pilliga Forest before setting off on their adventure.
  • Sculptures in the Scrub walking track Take a short walk around the Sculptures in the Scrub in Timmallallie National Park – award-winning sculptures that celebrate Aboriginal culture and history.

Aboriginal culture

Sculpture in the Scrub, Pilliga Nature Reserve. Photo: Rob Cleary

Pilliga is traditional Country of the Gamilaroi People and much evidence of their ancient connection to the land exists in the park today. On your exploration of the park, you may see stone tools, grinding grooves, modified trees, and rock art. Find out more about the Gamilaroi People and their ancient culture on a guided tour of Sandstone Caves, a place containing Aboriginal rock art and engravings.

  • Sandstone Caves walking track Take a self-guided tour along the Sandstone Caves walking track to see ancient Aboriginal rock art. For more of an insight into Aboriginal history, book a guided tour.
  • Sculptures in the Scrub walking track Take a short walk around the Sculptures in the Scrub in Timmallallie National Park – award-winning sculptures that celebrate Aboriginal culture and history.

Koala territory

A forest view in Pilliga Nature Reserve. Photo: Rob Cleary

Pilliga Forest supports a vast number of mammals, including swamp wallabies, eastern grey kangaroos, red-necked wallabies, and eastern pygmy possums. Pilliga also has the largest koala population in NSW to the west of the Great Dividing Range – look for them in the forest’s red gums and the Pilliga box. If you are lucky enough to spot a koala, please report your sighting to the Baradine NPWS office.

  • Salt Caves picnic area and Pilliga lookout tower Pause at Salt Caves picnic area on your exploration of Pilliga Forest and Timmallallie National Park. After a barbecue lunch, take a short walk to look for birds, or a longer hike up to Pilliga Forest lookout tower.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell

    Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    One of the most renowned Australian animals, the tree-dwelling marsupial koala can be found in gum tree forests and woodlands across eastern NSW, Victoria and Queensland, as well as in isolated regions in South Australia. With a vice-like grip, this perhaps most iconic but endangered Australian animal lives in tall eucalypts within a home range of several hectares.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

Sculpture in the Scrub Picnic Area and Campground, Pilliga National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary