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Corkwood and Scribbly Gum walking track

Yuraygir National Park

Overview

Corkwood and Scribbly Gum walking track, in Yuraygir National Park, is a short walk from Station Creek campground through coastal forest with birdwatching opportunities.

Where
Yuraygir National Park
Accessibility
Hard
Distance
2.3km loop
Time suggested
45min - 1hr 15min
Grade
Grade 2
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • There is limited mobile reception in this park

Corkwood and Scribbly Gum walking track is a short, easy hike that follows Station Creek Estuary upstream through coastal and scribbly gum forest. Whether you’re staying at Station Creek campground and want to explore Yuraygir National Park, or are just looking for a place to stop off and stretch your legs while on a coastal road trip through NSW, this loop track is a great place to divert your attention.

As the name suggests, the forest you’ll be walking through supports a high number of corkwood and scribbly gum trees. The bark of both of these is among some of the most fascinating in the Australian bush. Corkwood has thick, corky bark, while scribbly gums appear to have been drawn all over by an excited toddler. In fact, the scribbles, scientists have discovered only this century, are made by a tiny moth. Naturally, the moth has been named the scribbly gum moth.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Google Trekker, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

See more visitor info
Corkwood and scribbly gum walking track, Yuraygir National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary