Biamanga National Park

Overview

Jointly managed by Aboriginal people and the NPWS, Biamanga National Park is a significant Aboriginal site filled with dramatic landscapes and places to unwind.

Read more about Biamanga National Park

Sacred to the local Aboriginal Yuin People for centuries, in May 2006, Biamanga was returned to its traditional custodians as part of a joint management agreement with NSW National Parks. What does this mean? It means that when you visit Biamanga, you're visiting a place where decisions about the land are made by Aboriginal people. You're also visiting Aboriginal Country, where the mountains meet the sea and the landscape connects Aboriginal culture and lore.  A visit here is both special and unique.

The first thing that strikes you is a sense of remoteness and solitude: though only 20km from the town of Bega, Biamanga is a wild landscape of cascades and granite boulders, ribbon gums and gurgling creeks, not far from the Tasman Sea. Not only does the park feature Mumbulla Mountain and dramatic river gorges fed by natural springs, it also contains an important area of unmodified coastal foothill habitat. Environmentally speaking, a trip through Biamanga is a step back in time.

There are great opportunities for birdwatching in Biamanga, with species like the azure kingfisher often frolicking in the park. Lookouts provide scenic vantage points, easily reached by short walks suitable for children, and lots of picnic spots mean you can spend an entire afternoon just soaking up the atmosphere. Visiting Biamanga is the perfect way to explore Aboriginal history on the NSW Far South Coast, and offers plenty of reasons to have you coming back time and time again.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/biamanga-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

  • in the South Coast region
  • Biamanga National Park is always open, but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

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See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Biamanga National Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Biamanga National Park is 23km north of Bega.

    To get there from Bega:

    • Drive north-east along Dr George Mountain Road
    • Turn left on to Mumbulla Creek Road at the Biamanga Cultural Area sign
    • Continue along Mumbulla Creek Road and turn left at the intersection with Tee Ridge Road, to remain on Mumbulla Creek Road
    • Turn right on to Mumbulla Creek Falls Road and follow the signs to the Biamanga Cultural Area carpark

    Please note: there is no access to Biamanga National Park from the Princes Highway via Clarkes Road, as this is private property.

    Park entry points

    Parking

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    By public transport

    Biamanga is accessible via bus to Bega. For information about public transport options, visit the NSW country transport info website.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Biamanga National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Spring

    See the chefs cap correa flowers hanging from their stems, and bring binoculars for some excellent birdwatching opportunities.

    Summer

    Escape the heat of the sun by settling down for a picnic in the cool shade near Mumbulla Creek Falls. Goannas are regular visitors in the warmer months.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    13.9°C and 26.6°C

    Highest recorded

    44°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    2.3°C and 17.3°C

    Lowest recorded

    -8.1°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    August

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    454.2mm

    Facilities

    Toilets

    Picnic tables

    Barbecue facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Bega (24 km)

    With its forests, lush pastures and a coastline sculpted into a succession of wonders by the sea, the Sapphire Coast is a perfect holiday destination at any time of the year. Set in a valley at the junction of the Bega and Brogo rivers and surrounded by rich dairy country, Bega is a handsome, historic town that's the rural centre of the Sapphire Coast and gateway to the lush Bega Valley. Visit the Bega Cheese Heritage Centre, housed in a faithful reproduction of the original, tells the story of cheese-making production in the area.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Bermagui (57 km)

    Bermagui is a colourful port, famous for its deep-sea fishing. It's on the estuary of the Bermagui River, close to national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Eden (76 km)

    Eden is a historic whaling town, ideal for a whale-watch tour. It's built around a promontory that juts into Twofold Bay.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Biamanga National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Yuin Country

    Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    The landscape of Biamanga is sacred to the Yuin People, ancient custodians of this land, who maintain their strong traditional ties to it today. In 2006, Biamanga became jointly managed by the Aboriginal community and NPWS. There are a number of cultural sites throughout the area with spiritual significance for the Yuin. The best place to learn about these is Mumbulla Creek Falls, where interpretative signs detail the Aboriginal history of the region.

    • Biamanga Cultural area Biamanga Cultural area offers visitors to Biamanga National Park a scenic place to picnic and enjoy the short walk to a lookout with views over Mumbulla Falls and a beautiful gorge.

    Volcanic legacy

    Mumbulla Creek Falls, Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Mumbulla Mountain rises in the middle of Biamanga, and is largely the legacy of an ancient shield volcano. You can see this most clearly through a granitic creek corridor with massive boulders and plunge pools. This is the course of Mumbulla Creek, which rushes toward the coast from its origins up in the mountain. This park conserves an important area of substantially pristine coastal foothill environments, with monkey and ribbon gums clustered around the creekbeds. It also contains the endangered chefs cap correa, an unusual lemon and green flower that looks exactly like its namesake. The shrubs are endemic to NSW and popular with local birds.

    • Biamanga Cultural area Biamanga Cultural area offers visitors to Biamanga National Park a scenic place to picnic and enjoy the short walk to a lookout with views over Mumbulla Falls and a beautiful gorge.

    A precious haven

    River gorge, Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Biamanga conserves an important area of substantially pristine coastal foothill environments, with monkey and ribbon gums clustered around the creekbeds. It also contains the endangered chefs cap correa, an unusual lemon and green flower that looks exactly like its namesake. The shrubs are endemic to NSW and popular with local birds. Biamanga is also home to an array of wildlife, from goannas and eastern water dragons to swamp wallabies and some of the last remaining koalas in the south-eastern corner of NSW. Birds are also plentiful, including lyrebirds, azure kingfishers, flycatchers and blue wrens.

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Biamanga National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents.

    Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer/NSW Government