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Broadwater National Park

Overview

Situated between the villages of Evans Head and Broadwater, Broadwater National Park is a great place for hiking, picnicking, birdwatching, surfing and whale watching.

Read more about Broadwater National Park

Broadwater National Park is a great place to visit with friends and family, especially if you enjoy birdwatching. The swamps and marshlands of Broadwater are home to many waders such as ibis, herons and brolgas. The rare jabiru, which is a large stork originally from the Americas, is occasionally sighted around Salty Lagoon.

There’s also a great diversity of animals in Broadwater so keep an eye out for swamp wallabies, red-necked wallabies, echidnas, bandicoots, bush rats, blossom bats and ringtail possums. Early mornings and early evenings are the times when you’re most likely to see these creatures when they’re feeding or hunting.

There are some short walking tracks in Broadwater that lead to beaches where you’ll be able to see examples of the large sand dunes and swale gullies that were formed between the ice ages some 60,000 years ago. In spring and winter, take a look out to sea while you have a picnic and enjoy some whale watching.

Highlights in this park

  • Broadwater Beach picnic area, Broadwater National Park. Photo: L Walker

    Broadwater Beach picnic area

    Broadwater Beach picnic area is a great picnic area with birdwatching opportunities and the beach just nearby for swimming, surfing and fishing.

  • Red Bloodwood flower, Broadwater National Park. Photo: L Dargin

    Broadwater inland lookout

    It’s just a short walk to Broadwater inland lookout for superb scenic views from Broadwater Headland out to the Pacific Ocean with opportunities for b...

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Cosy Corner, Cape Byron State Conservation Area. Photo: John Spencer/OEH

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Contact

See more visitor info
Pig Face flower, Broadwater National Park. Photo: R Gates