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Burning Mountain walk

Burning Mountain Nature Reserve

Overview

Burning Mountain walk is the best way to discover this unusual nature reserve, with information panels along an accessible 4km return track that has some steep sections.

Where
Burning Mountain Nature Reserve
Distance
4km return
Time suggested
1 - 2hrs
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch

You would expect a fire sizzling below ground for 5,500 years to have some fairly dramatic effects on the vegetation, and the remarkable phenomenon of Burning Mountain is reflected in the plants and animals adapted to life around it. As you set out from the carpark on a moderate walk to the head of the coal seam, expect to pass through eucalypt groves and other types of Upper Hunter woodland. Plenty of dead trees and hollow logs provide homes for lots of wildlife.

As the fire moves one metre every year, the landscape changes: red gums grow along subsidence cracks, and later you’ll come across narrow-leaved stringy bark, tea trees, and stunted grey gums. There are loads of birds in the area, too, so bring the binoculars if birdwatching is an interest.

Anybody interested in the story of what’s going on below ground won’t be disappointed either: information panels along the track unpack the story of Burning Mountain, including its science and fascinating Aboriginal heritage. A viewing platform is located at the climax of Burning Mountain walk, providing a safe vantage point to view the exhaust vents and rocks transformed by extreme temperatures.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

  • in Burning Mountain Nature Reserve in the Country NSW region
  • Burning Mountain Nature Reserve is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

    • Scone
      (02) 6545 1128
      Contact hours: 8.30am-4.30pm Monday to Friday
    • 19 Hayes Street, Scone NSW 2337
    • Fax: (02) 6545 1912
    More
See more visitor info
Burning Mountain walk, Burning Mountain Nature Reserve. Photo: R Wilcher/NSW Government