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Rouse Hill Estate walk

Rouse Hill Regional Park

Overview

Take the short and easy Rouse Hill Estate walk for a glimpse into the history of the area. If you’ve time, explore the house on a guided tour.

Where
Rouse Hill Regional Park
Distance
1km loop
Time suggested
15min
Grading
Easy
Price
Free
Please note
  • It’s a good idea to put sunscreen on before you set out and remember to take a hat and drinking water
  • Dogs are permitted in this part of the park – you will need to keep them on a leash at all times and remember to pick up after them
  • Please take your rubbish with you when you leave the park
  • There are rainwater tanks, but it is recommended that you boil this water before drinking
  • Toilet facilities are located near the entry to the carpark
  • It can be a busy place on the weekend, so parking might be limited

Rouse Hill Estate walk is a short stroll that takes you near the grounds of the old Rouse Hill House and Farm.

The house was built between 1813 and 1818, and several generations descended from civil servant and grazier Richard Rouse, lived here until the 1980's; it’s now maintained by the Historic Houses Trust.

Get the kids to take a break from the adventure playground for a wander into history. It’s an easy walk, so it shouldn’t take too long. If you have time, take a guided tour to explore the time-warped rooms of the house, the ancient garden, stables, outbuildings and historic machinery.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Google Trekker, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Iron Bark Ridge, Rouse Hill Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek