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Falcon Crescent link track

Bomaderry Creek Regional Park


Take the track across the open wooded heath from North Nowra down into the beautiful gorge and link with the lovely walks of Bomaderry Creek.

Bomaderry Creek Regional Park
1.5km one-way
Time suggested
Please note
  • It’s a good idea to put sunscreen on before you set out and remember to take a hat and water
  • If you’re linking with the gorge tracks, don’t attempt to cross the creek after heavy rain.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch
  • Firewood may not be collected from the park
  • There is limited/no mobile reception in the Bomaderry Gorge
  • A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters

This walk is popular with locals because it provides such beautiful variety of landscapes and links the western side of the park at North Nowra with the wonderful walks of the gorge and the park’s attractive rainforest setting.

Setting out across open forested heath on the plateau, you’ll enjoy the views of the gorge before descending to the cool shade of Bomaderry Creek. The flowers in spring are spectacular and the nectar-feeding birds, like honeyeaters, love them too.

Why not pack some lunch and link up with the longer She-Oak crossing walk just up stream from Mossy Gully? This walk takes you past Bomaderry Creek picnic area where you can enjoy lunch before returning back across the heath.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info


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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

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Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Falcon Crescent plantlife, Bomaderry Creek Regional Park