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Baal Bone Gap picnic area

Gardens of Stone National Park


Visit the jewel in the crown of Gardens of Stone and marvel at the magnificent rock pagodas, sheer cliffs and endless scenic views of Baal Bone Gap.

Picnic areas
Gardens of Stone National Park
Opening times

Baal Bone picnic area is always open, but the road may become impassable in heavy rain.

Please note
  • Bushwalking from Baal Bone Gap should only be undertaken by experienced bushwalkers
  • You’ll need topographic maps and a compass or a GPS.
  • Don’t forget sunscreen and hat while riding
  • This park is in a remote location, so please make sure you’re well-prepared, bring appropriate clothing and equipment and advise a family member or friend of your travel plans.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch
  • You’ll need to bring your own drinking and cooking water
  • There is a wood barbecue in the picnic area – please bring your own wood.
  • If you’re camping in the park, please make sure you prepare thoroughly.

If you’re four-wheel driving, head out to Baal Bone Gap for a picnic and some of the finest views in the Blue Mountains. You’ll find huge examples of the rock pagodas that make this part of the mountains unique and see stunning sandstone cliffs and extensive views.

Baal Bone Gap is a popular place to begin a bushwalking exploration of the western end of the park. Enjoy a picnic and head out among the distinctive grass trees for a truly rejuvenating experience, but remember that trails are unmarked and walking in Gardens of Stone is for experienced and well-prepared bushwalkers only.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info


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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

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Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Wolgan Valley, Gardens of Stone National Park. Photo: Hamilton Lund