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248 trail

Popran National Park

Overview

248 trail is a popular horse riding and mountain biking track which meanders through Popran National Park in the NSW Central Coast hinterland.

Where
Popran National Park
Distance
2.5km one-way
Time suggested
2hrs
Grading
Medium
Price
Free
Please note
  • Horses are allowed on multi-use fire trails, such as 248 trail and Mount Olive trail.
  • If you’re mountain biking and you need to cross over a walking track (like Hominy Creek walking track to Emerald Pool), please dismount and carry your bicycle or leave it and continue on foot.
  • 248 track starts at Ironbark picnic area at the end of Ironbark Road. This area has a small dirt carpark and it’s not recommended for low-clearance 2WD vehicles.
  • You’ll need to bring drinking water as Ironbark picnic area only has tank water for washing hands
  • Tethering posts for horses are available

Aptly named 248 trail because it's 248m above sea level, this is a fantastic trail for mountain biking, horse riding and walking. The ride is relatively short so it’s a great one for kids. If you need a break along the way, there are areas to rest and admire Ironbark Creek and the surrounding forests.

Starting with dry open woodland, it soon transforms into a forest of ironbarks and imposing blue gums. Keep your eyes open for wildlife among the trees – you are bound to catch a glimpse of some of park’s many glossy black cockatoos, or even a honeyeater.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Using Google Street View Trekker, we've captured imagery across a range of NSW national parks and attractions. Get a bird's eye view of these incredible landscapes before setting off on your own adventure.

Google Trekker, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
248 Track, Popran National Park. Photo: John Yurasek