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248 trail

Important information

Alerts for Popran National Park: closed areas, upcoming fire bans

Details

Updated: 31/10/2014 03:17 PM

“The kids loved testing their bikes and themselves on this trail.”

Aptly named 248 trail because it's 248m above sea level, this is a fantastic trail for mountain biking, horse riding and walking. The ride is relatively short so it’s a great one for kids. If you need a break along the way, there are areas to rest and admire Ironbark Creek and the surrounding forests.

Starting with dry open woodland, it soon transforms into a forest of ironbarks and imposing blue gums. Keep your eyes open for wildlife among the trees – you are bound to catch a glimpse of some of park’s many glossy black cockatoos, or even a honeyeater.

Highlights
 

Getting there

Getting there:

To get there, from Sydney:

  • Take the F3 Sydney-Newcastle Freeway and exit at Calga onto Peats Ridge Road
  • After 13km, turn left onto Wisemans Ferry Road.
  • Continue a further 8km, and turn left onto Ironbark Road.
  • The trail starts 300m from the picnic area off Mount Olive trail

From Newcastle:

  • Take the F3 Sydney-Newcastle Freeway and exit at Peats Ridge Road
  • After 10km, turn right onto George Downs Drive.
  • Turn left onto Wisemans Ferry Road, continue a further 8km, and then turn left onto Ironbark Road.
  • The trail starts 300m from the picnic area off Mount Olive trail

Get driving directions

Go

Vehicle access:

Unsealed road/trail - 2WD vehicles - All weather

Parking:

Parking is available at the Ironbark picnic area.

Important info

Distance:

2.5km (one-way)

Time suggested:

2 hours each way

Difficulty:

Medium difficulty

You should know:

  • Horses are allowed on multi-use fire trails, such as 248 trail and Mount Olive trail.
  • If you’re mountain biking and you need to cross over a walking track (like Hominy Creek walking track to Emerald Pool), please dismount and carry your bicycle or leave it and continue on foot.
  • 248 track starts at Ironbark picnic area at the end of Ironbark Road. This area has a small dirt carpark and it’s not recommended for low-clearance 2WD vehicles.
  • You’ll need to bring drinking water as Ironbark picnic area only has tank water for washing hands
  • Tethering posts for horses are available

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- Alerts

Popran National Park

closed areas

Old Wagstaffe trail closure
There is no public access available through private property to Old Wagstaffe trail. Signs indicate where public access is not permitted.
 
Penalties apply for non-compliance
For more information, please contact the NPWS Hawkesbury North area office on (02) 4320 4200 or visit the NSW National Parks safety page.
Popran Creek closure
Popran Creek within Popran National Park has been temporarily closed due to the high risk of an upstream dam failing. There is no public access to Popran Creek or areas adjoining the creek for a vertical distance of 15m above the creek line.
Penalties apply for non-compliance
For more information, please contact the NPWS Hawkesbury North area office on (02) 4320 4200 or visit the NSW national parks safety page.
Temporary closure of Hominy Creek walking track
Hominy Creek walking track is temporarily closed to visitors due to erosion and poor condition following extreme weather. The walking track will remain closed until maintenance work can be completed.
For more information, please contact the NPWS Hawkesbury North area office on (02) 4320 4200 or visit the NSW national parks safety page.

upcoming fire bans

Fire ban (Saturday 1 November) A total fire ban has been declared by the Commissioner of the Rural Fire Service which includes this park. The total fire ban applies on Saturday 1 November for the entire 24 hour period. Total fire ban rules apply. This ban may be extended and any extension will be posted as soon as possible.
Find out more information about fire bans in parks and reserves including your responsibilities:http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/safety/fire
 

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248 Track, Popran National Park. Photo: John Yurasek