Walk to Bujwa Bay

Muogamarra Nature Reserve

Closed due to current alerts 

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Overview

Take a guided 7km walk through Muogamarra Nature Reserve, right on Sydney's doorstep, and enjoy the brilliant display of plants and wildflowers.

When

Wednesday 19 April 2023, 9am to 1pm

Accessibility
No wheelchair access
Grade
Medium. Suitable for adults and children 15 years and over. A good level of fitness is required. There are some hilly sections.
Price

Adult $20 per person. Concession (Student, Australian pension, Veterans Affairs and Seniors card holders) $15 per person. Child (15 to 17 years) $15 per person. Family (2 adults, 2 children) $60.

Meeting point
Cowan Oval, Bujwa Bay Road, Cowan.
Bookings
Bookings required. Phone 1300 072 757 for more information or book online.
Book now

Explore the diversity of plants and animal life on the southern side Muogamarra Nature Reserve. This 7km guided morning bushwalk is a rare opportunity to visit the area. It’s usually closed to the public to protect its fragile ecosystems.

Walk downhill from Cowan Oval through dry, ridge-top heathland and into cool, shaded rainforest areas. You’ll see waratahs, majestic angophoras, old-man banksias, pink boronias and delicate native orchids. Birdwatchers might glimpse a soaring wedge-tail eagle or an iconic lyrebird.

You’ll then arrive at Bujwa Bay and visit the site of the old boatshed and house. Your experienced National Parks and Wildlife guide will tell you about the rich history of the area. Enjoy a break for morning tea while you take in the stunning views over Berowra Creek.

Bring at least 1 litre of drinking water and morning tea. It’s a good idea to wear comfortable, enclosed shoes and bring a hat, sunscreen and all-weather clothing.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/guided-tours/walk-to-bujwa-bay/local-alerts

Bookings

Operated by

Image of: NSW National Parks logo
  • NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service

Park info

  • in Muogamarra Nature Reserve in the Sydney and surrounds region
  • Muogamarra Nature Reserve is open to the public from 9am to 4.30pm for 6 weeks around August and September each year. The reserve is closed to the public at other times to protect sensitive natural and cultural heritage values.

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Walk to Bujwa Bay.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Cowan Oval is located in the suburb of Cowan. To get there:

    By public transport:

    • Catch a train to Cowan Railway Station
    • Walk north along the Pacific Highway for 350m
    • Turn left onto Fraser Road and walk for 180m
    • Turn right onto Chandler Road and walk for 400m until you reach Bujwa Road
    • Turn left onto Bujwa Road. Cowan Oval is on the left

    By car:

    • Turn off the M1 Motorway at the Berowra exit
    • Turn right onto the old Pacific Highway toward Berowra and travel for 6km
    • Turn left onto Fraser Road and then right onto Chandler Road
    • Turn left onto Bujwa Road. Cowan Oval is on the left

    Parking

    Parking is available at Cowan Oval.

    Maps and downloads

    Accessibility

    Disability access level - no wheelchair access

    Not wheelchair-accessible

    Learn more

    Walk to Bujwa Bay is in Muogamarra Nature Reserve. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    A snapshot of colonial times gone by

    Sandstone wall in Muogamarra Naure Reserve. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    You'll also find remnants of colonial history at Muogamarra. During the 1830s and 1840s, several roads were built throughout the area, providing vital transport routes between Sydney and the Hawkesbury River. Remains of dry stone walls, culverts and foundations of earlier buildings can be found in the reserve.

    • Walk to Bujwa Bay Take a guided 7km walk through Muogamarra Nature Reserve, right on Sydney's doorstep, and enjoy the brilliant display of plants and wildflowers.

    Fascinating landscapes

    Lookout at Muogamarra Nature Reserve. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    Hawkesbury sandstone is the most common geological feature found within Muogamarra Nature Reserve and forms the extensive plateau on which you'll explore. Impressive volcanic pipes filled with solidified magma (a type of diatreme) can also be found at Peats Crater and Peats Bight. The volcanic rocks from these diatremes house a striking deep red soil which is rich in nutrients and fantastic nourishment for the plants which grow here.

    • Muogamarra Djarra crossing walk Get your heart pumping on this 8km walk along ridgeland forest and down to Djarra crossing near Cowan. Enjoy impressive views of the pristine Berowra Creek and Bujwa Bay in Muogamarra Nature Reserve.
    • Walk to Bujwa Bay Take a guided 7km walk through Muogamarra Nature Reserve, right on Sydney's doorstep, and enjoy the brilliant display of plants and wildflowers.

    Rich in Aboriginal significance

    Rock formation at the end of Point Loop walk in Muogamarra Nature Reserve. Photo: Amanda Cutlack/OEH

    The Aboriginal people of Muogamarra Country lived in the area for at least 20,000 years prior to European settlement, making extensive use of the Hawkesbury River and adjacent ridgelines. Evidence of Aboriginal heritage can be seen in engravings and shell middens found throughout the reserve. Discover the significance of Muogamarra to Aboriginal people today on a Muogamarra Indigenous heritage walk.

    • Muogamarra Djarra crossing walk Get your heart pumping on this 8km walk along ridgeland forest and down to Djarra crossing near Cowan. Enjoy impressive views of the pristine Berowra Creek and Bujwa Bay in Muogamarra Nature Reserve.

    The language of wildflowers

    Grey spider flower in Muogamarra Nature Reserve. Photo: Amanda Cutlack/OEH

    For plant lovers, it’s hard to find an area so diverse in unique plant life. There are over 900 plant species found in Muogamarra – an extraordinary amount given its relatively small size and proximity to the city. The spring wildflower displays will dazzle visitors with their bright colours. Get up close and see beautiful displays of native orchids, bright pink eriostemons, pink boronias and towering Gymea lilies. With such beautiful surroundings, it’s no wonder so many native animals make their home at Muogamarra. 14 species of native mammals, including the swamp wallaby, brush tail possum and echidna reside here. Also, 16 reptile species and 140 native birds have been recorded in the area. Spend a day exploring while listening to the laughing calls of the kookaburra and see if you can spot some wildlife on the trail ahead.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Brush tail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

      One of the most widespread of Australian tree-dwelling marsupials, the common brushtail possum is found across most of NSW in woodlands, rainforests and urban areas. With strong claws, a prehensile tail and opposable digits, these native Australian animals are well-adapted for life amongst the trees.

    Plants

    • Close up photo of a waratah flower, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Simone Cottrell/OEH.

      Waratah (Telopea speciosissima)

      The beautiful waratah is not only the NSW floral emblem, it's also one of the best-known Australian native plants. This iconic Australian bush flower can be found on sandstone ridges around Sydney, in nearby mountain ranges and on the NSW South Coast. The waratah has a vibrant crimson flowerhead, measuring up to 15cm across, and blossoms in spring.

    • A red triangle slug on the trunk of a scribbly gum tree in Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Elinor Sheargold/OEH

      Scribbly gum (Eucalyptus haemastoma)

      Easily identifiable Australian native plants, scribbly gum trees are found throughout NSW coastal plains and hills in the Sydney region. The most distinctive features of this eucalypt are the ‘scribbles’ made by moth larva as it tunnels between the layers of bark.

    • Old man banksia, Moreton National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

      Old man banksia (Banksia serrata)

      Hardy Australian native plants, old man banksias can be found along the coast, and in the dry sclerophyll forests and sandstone mountain ranges of NSW. With roughened bark and gnarled limbs, they produce a distinctive cylindrical yellow-green banksia flower which blossoms from summer to early autumn.

    •  Grey mangrove, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

      Grey mangrove (Avicennia marina)

      Grey mangrove is the most common and widespread mangrove found within intertidal zones across Australia, and throughout the world. Growing to a height of 3-10m, they thrive best in estuaries with a mix of fresh and salt water. They excrete excess salt through their long thick leaves, and absorb oxygen through their aerial root system.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)