New England National Park

Overview

Enjoy the spectacular natural beauty of New England National Park. It's home to World Heritage rainforest, and boasts magnificent views, fantastic walking and various accommodation options.

Read more about New England National Park

Located in the Northern Tablelands of NSW, New England National Park is a place of spectacular beauty and pristine wilderness. Part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area, it offers visitors an unforgettable holiday experience or a peaceful weekend getaway.

Discover the ancient world sealed in Gondwana rainforest, wander through snow gum forests dotted with crimson rosellas, and see breathtaking views from the Great Escarpment on one of the many walking tracks. Walks range from an easy 200m stroll to multi-day hikes through remote wilderness.

Experience sensational sunrises and breathtaking views stretching over forested valleys all the way to the coast from Point lookout. Pack a picnic and spend a few hours admiring the spectacular view before you.

Visit for the day, or take advantage of the various accommodation and camping options and stay a few days while immersing yourself in this magical world.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/new-england-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about New England National Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Dorrigo:

    • Travel west along Waterfall Way towards Armidale
    • Turn left and continue through the township of Ebor
    • After Ebor, turn left to stay on Waterfall Way heading towards Armidale.
    • After about 7.6km, turn left onto Point Lookout Road which continues until the park entrance.

    From Armidale:

    • Travel east along Waterfall Way towards Ebor and Dorrigo
    • About 7.6km before the township of Ebor, turn left onto Point Lookout Road which continues until the park entrance.

    Park entry points

    Parking

    Road quality

    • Unsealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Weather restrictions

    • All weather

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    By public transport

    For information about public transport options, visit the NSW country transport info website

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in New England National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    Enjoy the fresh air walking during the day, and cosy nights by the fire at Toms Cabin.

    Spring

    Climb up to Wrights lookout and see the colourful display of wildflowers.

    Summer

    Immerse yourself in the cool air and vibrant green of the Antarctic beech rainforest covered in moss.

    Winter

    Discover the spectacular icicles and frozen rock faces along the Weeping Rock walking track.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    10°C and 24°C

    Highest recorded

    32.8°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    1°C and 12°C

    Lowest recorded

    -7.1°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    January

    Driest month

    June

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    286.1mm

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the OEH pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Bellingen (39 km)

    Bellingen is a laid-back, tree-lined town with a New Age vibe. It's set in a luxuriant valley beside the Bellinger River.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Dorrigo (39 km)

    Dorrigo is a serene country town and the gateway to Dorrigo National Park. Its close to the edge of the escarpment above the Bellingen Valley.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Armidale (78 km)

    During autumn the parks and gardens around Armidale show their beautiful colours. Enjoy a drive along the Waterfall Way, stopping at waterfalls and craggy gorges in the rugged countryside.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    New England National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    World Heritage rainforests

    Wrights lookout, New England National Park. Photo: S Ruming

    The rainforests in New England National Park are part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area; the most extensive strip of diverse rainforest anywhere on earth. The World Heritage Area is a direct window into the past and the future, providing a link to the ancient pre-human world and a stunning and irreplaceable record of life on our planet. Discover the ancient Antarctic beech forests below the escarpment edge on trails like the Lyrebird or the Eagles Nest walking tracks.

    • Eagles Nest walking track See the best that the park has to offer in just a few hours on the Eagles Nest walking track. Experience World Heritage rainforest, snow gum forest and outstanding views.
    • Weeping Rock walking track A short walk along Weeping Rock walking track in New England National Park will take you to a basalt cliff with natural springs above and covered in moss and ferns.

    Historic heritage

    Point lookout, New England National Park. Photo: S Leathers

    In 2010, New England National Park celebrated its 75th anniversary as one of NSW's most iconic parks. Its history is a testament to the vision and dedication of several influential New Englanders, notably Philip A Wright and his son Peter. They were deeply impressed by the beauty and grandeur of Point Lookout and recognised the value of the area as a sanctuary for plants and animals. After you see the spectacular views at Point Lookout, take a moment to learn about the history of the park and the visionary people behind its conservation.

    Amazing wildlife

    Spotted-tailed Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), New England National Park. Photo: Jim Evans

    The park's altitudinal range, from 150m above sea level to 1563m, makes it a superb habitat for a diversity of wildlife. You might see kangaroos, wallabies, gliders, possums and the inquisitive spotted-tailed quoll. Adults and children alike will love watching the resident lyrebird at Banksia Point. Yet with over 100 species of birds in the park, there are plenty of opportunities for birdwatching. You might spot white-throated tree creepers and rufous fantails in the open forests, while in winter flowering banksias attract Lewins honeyeaters and eastern spinebills.

    • Point lookout walking track It only takes 20 minutes to negotiate the easy Point lookout walking track, but the views from this sealed track, within New England National Park, are truly stunning.
    • Wrights lookout walking track Wrights lookout walking track takes you through a lush world of ferns and wildflowers to a rocky plateau with spectacular panoramic views looking down to Bellinger River.

    Volcanic landscape

    Tea Tree Falls walk, New England National Park. Photo: J Evans

    The steep cliffs of the plateau edge at New England National Park are the result of at least 5 basalt lava flows from the Ebor volcano, forming a rim over 300m thick. Active until about 18 million years ago, this massive volcano was centred around The Crescent, a semi-circular ridge in the Bellinger Valley, visible from Point Lookout. Subsequent erosion has created the dramatic profile of the escarpment we see today. The Banksia Point circuit provides a close-up view of a basalt flow, and you can see the layers of cliffs north from Point lookout.

    • Point lookout Point lookout is a must-see destination for visitors to New England National Park, offering panoramic views across World Heritage rainforest to the ocean in the distance.
    • Tea Tree Falls walking track Roam through eucalypt forest and beneath hanging moss on Tea Tree Falls walking track, linking Thungutti campground and Toms Cabin in New England National Park.

    Aboriginal cultural heritage

    Point lookout, New England National Park. Photo: Shane Ruming

    The park straddles the traditional boundaries of the Dunghutti, Anaiwan and Gumbaynggirr People, and covers an area of great spiritual and cultural significance to local Aboriginals. Point Lookout in particular is a sacred location, known to Aboriginal people as 'Berarngutta', which roughly translates as 'prohibited area'. It is considered a men-only place, and today many Aboriginal women choose to continue this tradition and avoid visiting the area.

    • Point lookout Point lookout is a must-see destination for visitors to New England National Park, offering panoramic views across World Heritage rainforest to the ocean in the distance.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

      With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

    • Satin bowerbird. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Satin bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus)

      With vibrant blue-violet eyes and curious antics, the satin bowerbird is a favourite for bird watching and easy to spot as it forages for food in open forest. Relatively common across eastern Australia, in NSW they’re found in coastal rainforests and adjacent woodlands and mountain ranges.

    Plants

    • Blueberry ash. Photo: Jaime Plaza

      Blueberry ash (Elaeocarpus reticulatus)

      The blueberry ash is a rainforest shrub which produces blue olive-shaped berries and spectacular bell-shaped flowers, which often appear on the plant together. It is a tall slender shrub or small tree found in rainforest, tall eucalypt forest and coastal bushland in eastern NSW, south-east Queensland and Victoria.

    • Wonga Wonga vine. Photo: Barry Collier

      Wonga wonga vine (Pandorea pandorana)

      The wonga wonga vine is a widespread vigorous climber usually found along eastern Australia. A variation of the plant occurs in the central desert, where it resembles a sprawling shrub. One of the more common Australian native plants, the wonga wonga vine produces bell-shaped white or yellow flowers in the spring, followed by a large oblong-shaped seed pod.

    • Coachwood flower. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

      Coachwood (Ceratopetalum apetalum)

      Coachwood trees are Australian native plants that grow in warm temperate rainforests along coastal NSW. Also known as scented satinwood, the mottled grey bark of the coachwood has horizontal markings and a delicate fragrance.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    School excursions (1)

    What we're doing

    New England National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

    Preserving biodiversity

    New England National Park embraces efforts to support the biodiversity of its flora and fauna and to enhance the visitor experience at the same time. Restoration, conservation and bush regeneration activities are regularly carried out within this park and programs to maintain biodiversity are widespread and ongoing.

    Conservation program

    BioNet

    Uniting technology with the vast collection of information on biodiversity in NSW, BioNet is a valuable database open to any user. From individual plant sightings to detailed scientific surveys, it offers a wealth of knowledge about ecology and threatened species in NSW. 

    Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

    Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within New England National Park. NPWS carries out risk assessments for new and emerging weeds such as cats claw creeper and cherry guava to protect biodiversity in this park.

    Conservation program

    Wild dog control program

    Wild dogs can have significant impacts on other animals and are regarded as pests. Our wild dog control program operates in many NSW national parks and reserves. When carrying out such pest control, we aim to minimise the wild dogs’ effects on livestock and wildlife, while still maintaining dingo conservation in key areas.

    Developing visitor facilities and experiences

    NPWS is committed to providing ample facilities for visitors to enjoy. New England National Park frequently evaluates its visitor offerings to ensure park visitors are well catered for. Tourist accommodation, including the park’s campgrounds, is regularly reviewed, serviced and maintained to a high standard.

    Conserving our Aboriginal culture

    NPWS honours the Aboriginal heritage of New England National Park, and strives to ensure this heritage is appropriately recognised, supported and conserved. NPWS works closely with local Aboriginal communities and cultural programs and initiatives are in place within this park.

    Managing fire

    NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

    Conservation program

    Hazard reduction program

    Managing fire-prone NSW national parks requires a three-pronged approach, including fire planning, community education, and fuel management. When it comes to fuel like dead wood, NPWS conducts planned hazard reduction activities like mowing and controlled burning to assist in the protection of life, property and community.

    Point lookout from Wrights lookout, New England National Park. Photo: S Ruming/NSW Government